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How to apply paper artifact labels
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Sara Rivers-Cofield, Curator of Federal Collections at the Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory, walks through applying acid-free paper labels to artifacts. This is an alternative to labelling artifacts with permanent archival ink, and the tutorial is appropriate for both students and professional education. The Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory (MAC Lab) standards and guidelines for preparing artifact collections and their associated records, both paper and digital, for permanent curation at the lab can be found at https://jefpat.maryland.gov/Documents/mac-lab/technical-update-no1-collections-and-conservation-standards.pdf

The MAC Lab is a state-of-the-art archaeological research, conservation, and curation facility located at Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum, the State Museum of Archaeology. The MAC Lab serves as the primary repository for archaeological collections recovered from land-based and underwater projects conducted by state and federal agencies throughout Maryland.

This resource is part of Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum’s open educational resources project to provide history, ecology, archaeology, and conservation resources related to our 560 acre public park. JPPM is a part of the Maryland Historical Trust under the Maryland Department of Planning.

Subject:
Applied Science
Archaeology
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Module
Provider:
Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum
Author:
JPPM Admin
Date Added:
11/17/2021
How to pack artifact bags and boxes
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Walk through how to pack artifacts in bags and boxes for curation and storage with Sara Rivers-Cofield, Curator of Federal Collections, and Alice Merkel, Collections Assistant, at the Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory. In addition, tips are offered as to how best to arrange boxes to simplify handling and, as always, best protect artifacts. The Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory (MAC Lab) standards and guidelines for preparing artifact collections and their associated records, for permanent curation at the lab can be found at https://jefpat.maryland.gov/Documents/mac-lab/technical-update-no1-collections-and-conservation-standards.pdf

The MAC Lab is a state-of-the-art archaeological research, conservation, and curation facility located at Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum, the State Museum of Archaeology. The MAC Lab serves as the primary repository for archaeological collections recovered from land-based and underwater projects conducted by state and federal agencies throughout Maryland.

This resource is part of Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum’s open educational resources project to provide history, ecology, archaeology, and conservation resources related to our 560 acre public park. JPPM is a part of the Maryland Historical Trust under the Maryland Department of Planning.

Subject:
Archaeology
Social Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum
Author:
JPPM Admin
Date Added:
03/30/2022
If You Find an Artifact...
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What should you do if you're lucky enough to find an artifact? In this resource, JPPM Educator Kenny walks you through a simple 4-step process for making sure your find gets taken care of. Use to support Maryland Social Studies Frameworks for Grades 2 and 3. For Grade 2 Content Topic "Civic Engagement" search OER Commons for the related resource "JPPM - Marv's Story". Read the story together then as a class discuss and explore students' ideas of citizenship by asking whether Marv was a good citizen and if she could have made a different decision while still being a good citizen then have students reflect further by creating short profiles of people they respect, writing what makes them good citizens. For Grade 3 Content Topic "Civic Virtue" do the same except before discussing Marv's story have some students list their responsibilities if they find an artifact while others list what they are technically free to do even if they find an artifact. Then as a class decide if Marv had even more responsibility to do something when artifacts were found on her farm. If you evaluate or use this resource, please respond to this short (4 question) survey at bit.ly/3Gb4ZX5

Subject:
Archaeology
History
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Case Study
Provider:
Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum
Author:
JPPM Admin
Date Added:
12/03/2021
An Introduction to Aztec Religion, Philosophy, & their Worldview for beginners - Documentary Lecture
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If you have any trouble with the audio, try this version: https://youtu.be/mQWpO889MrQ(it is the same video with enhanced audio).

The Mexica were an incredibly advanced society……. but their religion and cosmovision is immensely layered and complex.

So in this brief lecture we’ll introduce Mexica philosophy, religion, and their worldview.

We’ll also introduce the most important deities, and talk about which deities are related because in many ways, the Aztec gods are a family history.

Subject:
Ancient History
Arts and Humanities
Ethnic Studies
History
Philosophy
Religious Studies
Social Science
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Author:
Professor Estrada Ph.D.
Date Added:
08/09/2023
JPPM - Marv's Story
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What should you do if you're lucky enough to find an artifact? In this resource, JPPM Educator Kenny walks you through a simple 4-step process for making sure your find gets taken care of. Available in video and text form, this resource also includes connections for instructors to Maryland State Social Studies Frameworks for grades 2 and 3 on Civic Engagment and Civic Virtue.

Subject:
Archaeology
History
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Case Study
Reading
Author:
JPPM Admin
Date Added:
06/29/2021
Lang101 Workbook. Linguistics Exercises & Activities for Starters
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Lang101 Workbook offers 460 commented exercises and activities, designed for absolute beginners to the study of language or for anyone curious about (why) language matters. It features empirical observation of 20 typologically distinct languages, including English and other languages you’re familiar with. As a companion tool to our textbook The Language of Language, Part 1 of the workbook contains 360 exercises and activities corresponding to the textbook's 12 chapters (30 per chapter), and 100 synthesising cross-chapter exercises. Part 2 contains commented answers to all exercises. Topics include the nature of scientific investigation; the structure of words, sounds and sentences; typical vs. disordered uses of language; child language, language learning and language play, as well as politeness, persuasion and humour.

Subject:
Languages
Linguistics
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Module
Unit of Study
Author:
Madalena Cruz-Ferreira
Sunita Abraham
Date Added:
04/17/2020
The Language of Language. A Linguistics Course for Starters
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If you've ever wondered why we need concepts like noun and verb or word and phrase when discussing language, this book is for you. Deliberately selective in its approach and assuming no prior knowledge of linguistics, The Language of Language explores the nature of language and linguists' agreed-upon ways of talking about the object of their inquiry. Our focus is on modes of thinking rather than content knowledge. Our goal is to encourage informed thinking about (why) language matters, so that you can continue puzzling about language issues long after you've worked your way through this book.Now in its third edition, the book is packed with over 100 commented activities, examples of language play, and fun food for thought, designed to whet your appetite for linguistics and language studies.The companion workbook, Lang101 Workbook, contains 460 additional commented exercises and activities, designed for self-study or for the classroom.

Subject:
Higher Education
Linguistics
Material Type:
Full Course
Module
Textbook
Author:
Madalena Cruz-Ferreira
Sunita Abraham
Date Added:
04/16/2020
Lenses of Vietnam: Protest in a Democracy [Inquiry Design Model (IDM) Unit Plan]
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This inquiry takes students through an analysis and evaluation of the Compelling Question “Is protest important in a democracy?” using the Vietnam War as a lens to approach the topic. To accomplish this, students will become more media literate through evaluating sources, biases, perspectives, and the goals of creating media. Throughout the inquiry, students will engage in activities designed to promote and develop media literacy while analzying the Compelling Question and learning about the historical protests of the Vietnam Era.This inquiry is expected to take two weeks (10 periods) to complete: one 45-minute class period to stage the question, introduce the inquiry, and to review media literacy; two 45-minute class periods for each of the three supporting questions; and then three 45-minute class periods for students to write and research their argumentative thesis. If students are as of yet less familiar with media literacy, the instructor should add at least another class period, or more, introducing them more fully to this.The full unit, along with all materials and resources, is available as a PDF attachment.

Subject:
Anthropology
Cultural Geography
History
Political Science
Social Science
Sociology
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Module
Primary Source
Reading
Unit of Study
Author:
Adam MacDonald
Date Added:
06/23/2020
Maamwi hub - Discover - The Indian Act
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The Indian Act, passed by the federal government in 1876 and still in force today, is the most significant piece of legislation impacting First Nations. The Act is just one of the methods the government used to assimilate First Nations. Note: The term "Indian" is an outdated term and is no longer appropriate to use today. The term is used in this section when referring to the Indian Act and its terms, and when quoting an Indigenous person who has chosen to use this term.

This is part of the Maamwi Hub's Discover Section, where you can find information and resources on Indigenous Peoples’ history, cultures, and perspectives, with a focus on the territory currently referred to as Ontario. Explore the entire Maamwi Hub by visiting the Provider Set linked below.

Subject:
Anthropology
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Interactive
Module
Reading
Provider:
College Libraries Ontario
Provider Set:
College Libraries Ontario - Maamwi Hub
Date Added:
04/20/2022
Mass Capture
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Chinese Head Tax and the Making of Non-Citizens

Short Description:
Mass Capture argues that the CI 9 documents implemented by the Canadian government as a means of acquiring information on Chinese migrants functioned as a form of surveillance – a process of mass capture that produced non-citizens. Cho reveals CI 9s as more than documents of racist repression: they offer possibilities for beauty and dignity in the archive, for captivation as well as capture.

Long Description:
Under the terms of the Chinese Immigration Act of 1885, Canada implemented a vast protocol for acquiring detailed personal information about Chinese migrants. Among the bewildering array of state documents used in this effort were CI 9s: issued from 1885 to 1953, they included date of birth, place of residence, occupation, identifying marks, known associates, and, significantly, identification photographs. The originals were transferred to microfilm and destroyed in 1963; more than 41,000 grainy reproductions of CI 9s remain.

Lily Cho explores how the CI 9s functioned as a form of surveillance and a process of mass capture that produced non-citizens, revealing the surprising dynamism of non-citizenship constantly regulated and monitored, made and remade, by an anxious state. The first mass use of identification photography in Canada, they make up the largest archive of images of Chinese migrants in the country, including people who stood no chance of being photographed otherwise. But CI 9s generated far more information than could be processed, and there is nothing straightforward about the knowledge that they purported to contain. Cho finds traces of alternate forms of kinship in the archive as well as evidence of the ways that families were separated. In attending to the particularities of these images and documents, Mass Capture uncovers the alternative story that lies in the refusals and resistances enacted by the mass captured.

Illustrated with painstakingly reconstituted digital reproductions of the microfilm record, Mass Capture reclaims the CI 9s as more than documents of racist repression, suggesting the possibilities for beauty and dignity in the archive, for captivation as well as capture.

Word Count: 84629

Included H5P activities: 21

ISBN: 9780228009320 (ePDF) 9780228009337 (ePUB) 9780228009344 (Open Access)

(Note: This resource's metadata has been created automatically as part of a bulk import process by reformatting and/or combining the information that the author initially provided. As a result, there may be errors in formatting.)

Subject:
Ethnic Studies
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
McGill University
Date Added:
11/01/2021
Mendez v. Westminster Case
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The Mendez family won the landmark federal court case that challenged segregation in California schools. In 1947 California was the first state to officially end segregation in public schools. Today it is the most segregated state for Latinos.

Subject:
Education
Elementary Education
Ethnic Studies
History
Social Science
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Lecture
Lesson
Module
Unit of Study
Author:
Anupama Mande
Date Added:
07/09/2020
Multilinguals are ...?
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CC BY
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Multilinguals, those of us who use more than one language in everyday life, are... gifted semilinguals who are dominant in no mother tongue, for example? Apparently so, judging by the ways people keep talking about them. This is the first book that discusses, in light-hearted lay terms, the reasons behind the beliefs and myths about multilinguals that allow you to fill the blank in its title with almost any label and get away with it. Drawing on solid academic research, the book provides keys to the origin and endurance of the many intriguing names that multilinguals have been called, starting with the master-key to them all. The conclusion is that any oddities assigned to multilinguals are due to the language that is used to talk about them, not to multilingual behaviour itself. The book is abundantly illustrated and includes many cartoons. It is written for the general public, families, teachers, policy-makers, clinicians, and anyone who ever wondered about multilingualism, but is targeted exclusively at multilingual or monolingual readers (of English).

Subject:
Languages
Linguistics
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Madalena Cruz-Ferreira
Date Added:
04/17/2020
Myth: How Our Stories Connect Us All
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CC BY
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This resource is a lesson plan intended to introduce minoritized freshman and sophomore college students to the study of mythology and to its universal importance as the foundation of our common cultural heritage. The module may also be modified to accomodate high school level language arts courses. This resource will represent approximately three weeks of a typical 10 to 15 week World Literature survey course. 

Subject:
Ancient History
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Ethnic Studies
Film and Music Production
Gender and Sexuality Studies
Literature
World Cultures
Material Type:
Interactive
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Module
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Author:
Linda Woods
Date Added:
06/26/2021
The Native Conquest of the Aztecs: How Indigenous, not the Spanish, defeated Mexico-Tenochtitlan
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CC BY-ND
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The Spanish were savage and barbaric in Mexico… And the Conquest of the Mexica was extremely bloody. But it’s often told as ONLY the Spanish Vs. the Aztecs. And that’s not true… It’s not even close. The so called, “Conquest” of Mexico-Tenochtitlan was really a NATIVE REVOLT. It was ancient indigenous Mexicans against other Native Mexicans. Clearly… the Spanish were the main manipulators.

But it was Native Mexicans who organized, fought and overthrew: Mexico-Tenochtitlan. So much so…. That Native Mexicans accounted for 99% of all people who fought or assisted in the overthrow of the Aztecs, of Mexico-Tenochtitlan in 1521.

And… Who were the Indigenous Mexican allies of the Spanish? They were the Tabascans, the Cempoalans, Texcocans, the Totonacs, Huezotzingos, Chalcas, Quauhquecholtecas, the Zapotec, Mixtec, the Yope, the Xochilmcos, the Tlaxcalans, the Tarascans……And many….. Many….. more. And what did Native Allies provide a handful of Spanish….. Food….. Translation… Advice… Medical Assistance… Labor, especially porters… Housing… Clothing… Guides… Spies.. Messengers….Moral Support…Sex….. And …. Warriors to fight the Aztec and their allies. And much, much, more.

Now… this brief film isn’t a history of the so-called Spanish Conquest….. This is a history of the Native Revolt against Mexico-Tenochtitlan …… it’s a Native Revolution… As Cortes and about 500 Spaniards marched to Mexico-Tenochtitlan from the East… (their maximum number perhaps doubled). He was joined by hundreds of thousands of the largest and fiercest army ever assembled in Mesoamerica.

Subject:
Ancient History
Arts and Humanities
Ethnic Studies
History
Social Science
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Author:
Professor Estrada Ph.D.
Date Added:
08/09/2023
Native Peoples of North America
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Native Peoples of North America is intended to be an introductory text about the Native peoples of North America (primarily the United States and Canada) presented from an anthropological perspective. As such, the text is organized around anthropological concepts such as language, kinship, marriage and family life, political and economic organization, food getting, spiritual and religious practices, and the arts. Prehistoric, historic and contemporary information is presented. Each chapter begins with an example from the oral tradition that reflects the theme of the chapter. The text includes suggested readings, videos, and classroom activities.

Subject:
Anthropology
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Textbook
Provider:
State University of New York
Provider Set:
Milne Open Textbooks
Author:
Susan Stebbins
Date Added:
10/23/2013
See How Much You Know About Immigration in the United States
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On behalf of the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR), take this quiz to test your knowledge of the trends and policies surrounding U.S. immigration.

Subject:
Cultural Geography
Ethnic Studies
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Interactive
Module
Author:
Council on Foreign Relations
Date Added:
07/31/2018
Silica Gel Use and Regeneration
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CC BY
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Nichole Doub, Head Conservator, and Alice Merkel, Collections Assistant, at the Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory, walk through the use of silica gel in buffered microenvironments and the process of regenerating used gel. NOTE: Sound quality is lower than normal--captions have been provided. Additional references can be found online with CCI's Technical Bulletin 33 and Steve Weintraub's "Demystifying Silica Gel." The Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory (MAC Lab) standards and guidelines for preparing artifact collections and their associated records, for permanent curation at the lab can be found at https://jefpat.maryland.gov/Documents/mac-lab/technical-update-no1-collections-and-conservation-standards.pdf

The MAC Lab is a state-of-the-art archaeological research, conservation, and curation facility located at Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum, the State Museum of Archaeology. The MAC Lab serves as the primary repository for archaeological collections recovered from land-based and underwater projects conducted by state and federal agencies throughout Maryland.

This resource is part of Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum’s open educational resources project to provide history, ecology, archaeology, and conservation resources related to our 560 acre public park. JPPM is a part of the Maryland Historical Trust under the Maryland Department of Planning. If you evaluate or use this resource, please respond to this short (4 question!) survey at bit.ly/329QvZ5

Subject:
Anthropology
Applied Science
Archaeology
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Module
Provider:
Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum
Author:
JPPM Admin
Date Added:
12/18/2021
U.S. Child Labor History: A Documentary Lecture on Child Workers During the Progressive Era
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All of these children are part of U.S. child labor history, where many children were exploited by companies, working long 10-12, sometimes 16 hours shifts for as little as pennies a day. These kids were exploited until unions and federal and state labor laws protected kids. From 1870 – 1890, child labor increased three fold. 1870 was the 1st U.S. census that reported child labor statistics, and 750,000 children worked. Child labor peaked in 1900 when 18.2% of all U.S. kids under the age of 16 WORKED, often at very dangerous jobs.

Subject:
Ethnic Studies
History
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Lesson
Author:
Professor Estrada Ph.D.
Date Added:
08/09/2023
Visualizing the Middle East: Course Website
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VISUAL CULTURES OF THE MIDDLE EAST MOVING IMAGES FROM DAGUERREOTYPES TO SMARTPHONES:
This course examines changing technologies of image capture/(re)production/circulation in the Middle East from the turn of the century through today. We examine historical moments through an appreciation of changing technological advancements of visual material. From changing printing practices on postcards, consumer grade cameras, increasing photographs in periodicals, TVs & VHS, leading up to networked technologies and the digital morass in which we now live. Across the course, emergent technological capabilities of visuality become entwined in issues of nationalism, revolt, consumerism, tourism, changing gender roles, and boundaries of sexuality.
The second half of the course focuses on the contemporary landscape of smartphones/internet/apps/digitality and the dizzying array of visual material in which we now drown. From protests to citizen journalists, emergent political movements and social media on smartphones, from Grindr to surveillance, selfies, & sex.
Finally, there is an emphasis for students to develop and integrate visual material in their developing research agendas. We will explore some visual methods across the course and you will learn how to create a digital story paying special attention to not simply using visual material as the "representation" of your argument.

Subject:
Anthropology
Arts and Humanities
Social Science
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Syllabus
Author:
Jared McCormick
Date Added:
03/02/2022
What Do We Know About the World? Rhetorical and Argumentative Perspectives
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What do we know about the world? Rhetorical and Argumentative Perspectives is a book trying to answer the title question by contributing to rhetorical and argumentative studies. It consists of papers presented at the “First International Conference on Rhetoric in Croatia: the Days of Ivo Škarić” in May, 2012, and subsequently revised for publication. Through a variety of different routs, the papers explore the role of rhetoric and argumentation in various types of public discourse and present interdisciplinary work connecting linguists, phoneticians, philosophers, law experts and communication scientists in the common ground of rhetoric and argumentation.. The Conference was organized with the intent of paying respect to the Croatian rhetorician and professor emeritus Ivo Škarić who was the first to introduce rhetoric at the Department of Phonetics at the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Zagreb.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Communication
Linguistics
Social Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
University of Windsor
Date Added:
01/01/2013