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The Bible
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This course is an introduction to major books from both the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament. Particular attention has been given to literary techniques, issues resulting from translation from the original Hebrew and Greek, and the different historical periods that produced and are reflected in the Bible. Investigation of the Bible as influence in later narrative, philosophic, and artistic traditions.

Subject:
Ancient History
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
History
Literature
Reading Literature
Religious Studies
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Lipkowitz, Ina
Date Added:
02/01/2007
Biographical Dictionary of the History of Paleoanthropology
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Long Description:
The Biographical Dictionary of the History of Paleoanthropology is an ongoing digital humanities project by Dr. Matthew Goodrum, a historian of science who teaches in the Department of Science, Technology, and Society at Virginia Tech. The work contains biographies of individual paleoanthropologists, especially those for whom little information exists in English. They are organized in alphabetical order. Each biography is subject to revision as new information comes to light, and new biographies will be added over time.

Word Count: 92962

(Note: This resource's metadata has been created automatically by reformatting and/or combining the information that the author initially provided as part of a bulk import process.)

Subject:
Ancient History
Anthropology
Applied Science
Health, Medicine and Nursing
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Virginia Tech
Date Added:
07/31/2022
A Brief History of the American Southwest for Kids
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The Children’s Hour has produced a six part podcast and curriculum series on the history of the American Southwest, in partnership with the Center for New Mexico Archaeology, the Native American Community Academy (NACA), NACA Inspired Schools Network, and numerous others.Typically a region of the US that is overlooked in textbooks, the Southwestern United States history begins 23,000 years ago in what is now know as White Sands National Park.  Students will learn how the area was settled, from its Indigenous beginnings through the brutal era of Colonization by Spain, and then the United States, and finally emerging into statehood. This series highlights the moments that changed the history of this region and this nation forever.The series comes with a free, download-able Learn-Along Guide that meets and cites US national education standards for elementary through high school students. Our production began with “virtual field trips” for students that include expert interviews to better understand each time period. Students can hear the full conversations with our experts by watching the field trips at The Children's Hour YouTube page.Join us, and learn about our fragile, and deeply rooted story of our high desert region over six episodes, and through our Learn-Along guide. 

Subject:
Ancient History
Arts and Humanities
Elementary Education
History
U.S. History
World Cultures
Material Type:
Lecture
Student Guide
Unit of Study
Author:
Katie Stone
Date Added:
01/23/2023
The City of Athens in the Age of Pericles
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This course investigates the relationship between urban architecture and political, social, and cultural history of Athens in the 5th and 4th centuries BC. It surveys and analyzes archeological and literary evidence, including the sanctuary of Athena on the Acropolis, the Agora, Greek houses, the histories of Herodotus and Thucydides, plays of Sophocles and Aristophanes, and the panhellenic sanctuaries of Delphi and Olympia.

Subject:
Ancient History
Applied Science
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
History
Literature
Reading Literature
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Broadhead, William
Date Added:
09/01/2014
Classical Literature: The Golden Age of Augustan Rome
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Roman Literature of the Golden Age of Augustus Caesar, produced during the transition from Republican to Imperial forms of government, was to have a profound and defining influence on Western European and American societies. These writings ultimately established lasting models of aesthetic refinement, philosophical aspiration, and political ambition that continue to shape modern cultures. This class will be exploring the Golden Age of Latin Literature from an historical perspective in order to provide an intensive examination of the cultural contexts in which these monumental works of classical art were first produced. Readings will emphasize the transition from a Republican form of government to an Empire under the rule of Augustus Caesar and the diversity of responses among individual authors to the profound structural changes that Roman society was undergoing at this time. Particular attention will be devoted to the reorganization of society and the self through textuality, the changing dimensions of the public and the private, the roles of class and gender, and the relationship between art and pleasure. Writings covering a wide variety of literary genres will include the works of Caesar, Cicero, Catullus, Livy, Virgil, Horace, and Ovid, with additional readings from Cassius Dio for background.

Subject:
Ancient History
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
History
Literature
Philosophy
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Cain, James
Date Added:
09/01/2004
The Codex Maya of Mexico (Codice Maya) Fully Explained, page-by-page. Formerly the Grolier Codex.
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The Codice Maya de Mexico has one primary story, it records the complex movements of the planet Venus across its 4 cycles. The 10-pages codex records 65 complete Venus Cycles, which takes a total of 104 years.

The Codice Maya of Mexico was written in 1,110 CE by a single Mayan scribe. It is the oldest book in all the Americas. This video will translate this 900 year old Maya Codex, page-by-page.

The book was found in the 1960s by looters, and it's taken more than 50 years to analyze and authenticate this book. But this Mexican book is 100% real.

Subject:
Ancient History
Art History
Arts and Humanities
Ethnic Studies
History
Social Science
World History
Material Type:
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Author:
Professor Estrada Ph.D.
Date Added:
08/09/2023
Confucianism Explained
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CC BY-NC-ND
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This video explains the teachings of Confucius. Education is the path to moral excellence, which is central to building a harmonious society. Education is a lifelong process and the purpose of learning is to acquire virtues.

Subject:
Ancient History
Arts and Humanities
Ethnic Studies
History
Philosophy
Religious Studies
Social Science
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Lecture
Lesson
Module
Unit of Study
Author:
Anupama Mande
Date Added:
07/09/2020
A Digital Tutorial For Ancient Greek Based On John William White's First Greek Book
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John William White's First Greek Book was originally published in 1896. The book contains a guided curriculum built around the language and vocabulary of Xenophon’s Anabasis. This digital tutorial is an evolving edition that is designed to run on both traditional browsers, tablet devices, and phones. Each lesson includes drill and practice exercises in addition to the text itself. The site also includes tab-delimited files for all of the vocabulary and grammar that can be imported into flashcard programs.

For more information about the design of the tutorial, you can read an article that was published in Volume 107, Number 1, Fall 2013 of the journal Classical World on pages 111-117 or a presentation from the 2013 meeting of the Digital Classics Association. An article about the audiences and usage statistics for the tutorial entitled An Open Tutorial for Beginning Ancient Greek has been published in a volume of papers entitled Word, Space, Time: Digital Perspectives on the Classical World. edited by Gabriel Bodard & Matteo Romanello and published by Ubiquity Press.

You can use these pages to study Ancient Greek online. As you complete the drill and practice exercises in each chapter, you will earn drachmas to help track your progress. The exercises keep track of the questions you have missed and presents those to you more often. Information about your progress is stored in a cookie on your computer. You can clear all of this data on the settings page.

When you have successfully completed all of the exercises in a chapter, you will have ten drachmas. You will lose drachmas as time passes so you know when you need to review chapters again.

Subject:
Ancient History
Arts and Humanities
History
Languages
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Jeff Rydberg-Cox
Date Added:
11/01/2018
Early Civilizations & 3-D Nets
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This resource was created by Michael Fehringer, in collaboration with Lynn Bowder, as part of ESU2's Mastering the Arts project. This project is a four year initiative focused on integrating arts into the core curriculum through teacher education and experiential learning.

Subject:
Ancient History
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
Arts ESU2
Date Added:
11/01/2021
Early Music
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This course examines European music from the early Middle Ages until the end of the Renaissance. It includes a chronological survey and intensive study of three topics: chant and its development, music in Italy 1340-1420, and music in Elizabethan England. Instruction focuses on methods and pitfalls in studying music of the distant past. Students' papers, problem sets, and presentations explore lives, genres, and works in depth. Works are studied in facsimile of original notation, and from original manuscripts at MIT, where possible.

Subject:
Ancient History
Arts and Humanities
History
Performing Arts
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Cuthbert, Michael
Date Added:
09/01/2010
Early Muslim Civilizations (622-1629) Unit (9th Grade World Studies)
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Mini-Unit Rationale:In this unit, the content to be covered will all fall under the subheading of early Muslim Civilizations. Previously the students have studied early river valley civilizations such as in the Fertile Crescent, the Indus River Valley, the Americas, the Huang River Valley and the Nile River Valley. The students will be able to use their previous knowledge of the basic constructs of a civilization to build upon the content in this chapter (10) that outlines the creation, spread and division of the Muslim political and religious empires of the Middle East. This mini-unit will lead students to the next mini-unit, which covered the spread of Islam into South and Southeast Asia through religious, cultural and political diffusion among other varying factors.This mini-unit will consist of five 45-minute lessons to be taught to a college-prep level freshman World Studies course in a private, co-educational Catholic high school classroom. There are sixteen students in the class, of varying academic abilities. Some students in the general education class have 504 accommodation plans and two have IEP’s, but they are grouped heterogeneously into this social studies course with all college-prep level students. The school is a 1 to 1 school, and all students have iPads with Ebook textbooks, internet capability, QR code readers and the whole slate of Google Apps downloaded onto their tablets. The students will all have multiple new applications downloaded onto their iPads prior to this mini-unit, and will learn how to use them during tutorial portions within this mini-unit.Overall Goal:This mini-unit is designed to help students develop as historical thinkers, critical thinkers, and digital citizens through the lens of analyzing the origins, division and spread of early Muslim civilizations.Overall Objectives:1. Students will be able to... identify the prophet of Islam, Muhammad, and explain how his teachings spread the Islamic beliefs throughout the Middle East and eventually, the world.2. Students will be able to... explain how Islam affected all aspects of religious and secular society for Muslims, and how this led to advancements and innovation in many parts of the world.3. Students will be able to... explain the divisions that emerged within Islam and the differences between their major beliefs.4. Students will be able to... explain the rise of the Umayyad and Abbasid caliphates and how those empires affected the Middle East and the surrounding lands.5. Students will be able to… read and understand detailed maps and virtual reality images of the important historical sites of Mecca and Medina, and explain their significance to the rise and spread of Islam.Overall Standards:NCSS Standards Strands:Time, Continuity and Change: Evaluate the impact of the institutions, values, and beliefs of people in the past on important historical decisions and developments, and compare different interpretations of the causes and consequences of these decisions and developments.Individuals, Groups and Institutions: Evaluate different interpretations of the influence of groups and institutions on people and events in historical and contemporary settings.Individuals, Groups and Institutions: Analyze examples of tensions between belief systems and governmental actions and policies.Power, Authority and Governance: Examine persistent issues involving the rights, responsibilities, roles, and status of individuals and groups in relation to the general welfare.Global Connections: Describe and explain conditions and motivations that contribute to conflict, cooperation, and interdependence among groups, societies, and nations.CSDE Common Core Social Studies Standards:GEO 6–7.2 Use maps, satellite images, photographs, and other representations to explain relationships between the locations of places and regions, and changes in their environmental characteristics.GEO 6–7.3 Explain how cultural patterns and economic decisions influence environments and the daily lives of people.GEO 6–7.4 Analyze the cultural and environmental characteristics that make places both similar to and different from one another.GEO 6–7.5 Explain the connections between the physical and human characteristics of a region and the identity of individuals and cultures living there.CIV 6–7.1 Explain specific roles played by citizens (such as voters, jurors, taxpayers, members of the armed forces, petitioners, protesters, and officeholders).CIV 6–7.3 Compare historical and contemporary means of changing societies and promoting the common good.HIST 6–8.1 Use questions about historically significant people or events to explain the impact on a region.INQ 9–12.5: Determine the kinds of sources that will be helpful in answering compelling and supporting questions, taking into consideration multiple points of view represented in the sources, the types of sources available, and the potential uses of the sources.Connecticut Common Core Literacy Standards:CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.8: Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.CCSS.ELA Literacy and Reading RH.11-12.2: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.Diocese of Bridgeport Standards:Historical Thinking: Students will develop historical thinking skills, including chronological thinking and recognizing change over time; contextualizing, comprehending and analyzing historical literature; researching historical sources; understanding competing narratives and interpretation; and constructing narratives and interpretation.Diocese of Bridgeport Historical Thinking Skills:Skill 1: Trace the emergence and decline of Muslim civilizations.Skill 2: Explain how geography and history are linked.Skill 3: Describe the tenets of Islam.Skill 4: Analyze the reason for the division of Islam.Skill 5: Evaluate the role of religion in the development of the Muslim empires in the Middle East.Skill 6: Describe the major characteristics of Muslim empires.Skill 7: Describe examples of cultural diffusion from the Muslim Empires.Skill 8: Describe the characteristics and advances of the Golden Age of Islam.Local, United States and World History: Students will use historical thinking skills to develop an understanding of the major historical periods, issues and trends in United States history, world history, and Connecticut and local history.Historical Themes: Students will apply their understanding of historical periods, issues and trends to examine such historical themes as ideals, beliefs and instructions; conflict and conflict resolution; human movement and interaction; and science and technology in order to understand how the world came to be the way it is.Applying History: Students will recognize the continuing importance of historical thinking and historical knowledge in their own lives and in the world in which they live.ISTE Net Standards for Students:Empowered Learner: 1C: Students use technology to seek feedback that informs and improves their practice and to demonstrate their learning in a variety of ways.1D: Students understand the fundamental concepts of technology operations, demonstrate the ability to choose, use and troubleshoot current technologies and are able to transfer their knowledge to explore emerging technologies.Digital Citizen: 2B: Students engage in positive, safe, legal and ethical behavior when using technology, including social interactions online or when using networked devices.2C: Students demonstrate an understanding of and respect for the rights and obligations of using and sharing intellectual property.Knowledge Constructor: 3A: Students plan and employ effective research strategies to locate information and other resources for their intellectual or creative pursuits.3C: Students curate information from digital resources using a variety of tools and methods to create collections of artifacts that demonstrate meaningful connections or conclusions.Innovative Designer: 4A: Students know and use a deliberate design process for generating ideas, testing theories, creating innovative artifacts or solving authentic problems.Creative Communicator: 6B: Students create original works or responsibly repurpose or remix digital resources into new creations.6C: Students communicate complex ideas clearly and effectively by creating or using a variety of digital objects such as visualizations, models or simulations.6D: Students publish or present content that customizes the message and medium for their intended audiences.Global Collaborator: 7B: Students use collaborative technologies to work with others, including peers, experts or community members, to examine issues and problems from multiple viewpoints.7C: Students contribute constructively to project teams, assuming various roles and responsibilities to work effectively toward a common goal.7D: Students explore local and global issues and use collaborative technologies to work with others to investigate solutions.Overall Unit Assessments:Formative Assessments: Teacher will monitor student progress by circulating and assessing student on-task behavior while providing immediate feedback and redirection if necessary.Teacher will check daily student progress via student-group Google Doc sheets.Students will take various Google Forms formative assessments to gauge their individual understanding of the content knowledge, as well as reflect on their collaboration and participation in lesson activities.Answer Garden formative assessment will be posed to gauge their individual understanding of the content knowledge, as well as reflect on their collaboration and participation in lesson activities.Students will participate in interactive Kahoot Quizzes to help both teacher and student understand individual real-time comprehension levels.Summative Assessments:Students will create an original telecast in small groups of three to display their knowledge and understanding of the Umayyad and Abbasid Empires and/or the Golden Age of Muslim Civilization, and this mini-unit overall.Students will take a summative assessment at the end of Chapter 11 (after multiple mini-units are completed) in the form of a pen-to-paper Unit test.Summary of Mini-Unit:Students will begin this unit by learning about the context of the time period, and the geography of the land and cities from where the early Muslim civilizations emanated. Then, they will learn about the major tenets of Islam and a religion and Muslims as a culture and the political systems of the early empires. Next, students will analyze the origins and spread of conflict that lead to the division of Islam into the two major sects of the religion: Sunni and Shi’a. Finally, students will learn about the Umayyad and Abbasid empires and analyze their contributions to society and culture in the Middle East, as well as trace the emergence and decline of those Muslim empires.Technology Rationale:The 9th grade students will be using various technologies each day of this mini-unit, ranging from iPad applications, to QR codes, to engaging Smart-board technology. The integration of technology into this mini-unit will optimize students’ learning experience by encouraging student collaboration, providing innovative ways of communicating their own ideas, and engaging students as global citizens who demonstrate an understanding of digital citizenship and proper use of technology in an academic setting. Some of the technologies used by the teacher and students are included to streamline the transition process and create a paperless classroom environment, which will provide many benefits for the class and even transcend the classroom, such as environmental and economical.

Subject:
Ancient History
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Rebecca Corso
Date Added:
07/21/2017
Early Timeline Creation
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This resource was created by Whittney Carnahan, in collaboration with Dawn DeTurk, Hannah Blomstedt, and Julie Albrecht, as part of ESU2's Integrating the Arts project. This project is a four year initiative focused on integrating arts into the core curriculum through teacher education, practice, and coaching.

Subject:
Ancient History
Graphic Arts
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Arts ESU2
Date Added:
09/05/2022
Egyptian Mathematics
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The Egyptians are known for being ahead of their time in comparison to some civilisations that came after them. This unit looks at how the Egyptians solved mathematical problems in everyday life and the technology they used. An understanding of this area has only been possible following the translation of the Rosetta Stone.

Subject:
Ancient History
History
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Open University
Provider Set:
Open University OpenLearn
Date Added:
09/06/2007
The Emergence of Europe: 500-1300
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This course surveys the social, cultural, and political development of western Europe between 500 and 1350. A number of topics are incorporated into the broad chronological sweep of the course, including: the Germanic conquest of the ancient Mediterranean world; the rise of a distinct northern culture and the Carolingian Renaissance; the emergence of feudalism and the breakdown of political order; contact with the Byzantine and Islamic East and the Crusading movement; the quality of religious life; the vitality of the high medieval economy and culture; and the catastrophes of the fourteenth century.

Subject:
Ancient History
Anthropology
Arts and Humanities
History
Philosophy
Social Science
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
McCants, Anne
Date Added:
09/01/2003
Empire: Introduction to Ancient and Medieval Studies
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This course is an investigation of the Roman empire of Augustus, the Frankish empire of Charlemagne, and the English empire in the age of the Hundred Years War. Students examine different types of evidence, read across a variety of disciplines, and develop skills to identify continuities and changes in ancient and medieval societies. Each term this course is different, looking at different materials from a variety of domains to explore ancient and mideveal studies. This version is a capture of the course as it was taught in 2012, and does not reflect how it is taught currently.

Subject:
Ancient History
Arts and Humanities
History
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Bahr, Arthur
Broadhead, William
Goldberg, Eric
Date Added:
09/01/2012
The Epic of Gilgamesh
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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This video offers a summary and analysis of the main themes in the Epic of Gilgamesh. The world’s first recorded epic poem, from Mesopotamia, explores important questions: can humans defy aging and conquer death?

Subject:
Ancient History
Arts and Humanities
Ethnic Studies
History
Literature
Social Science
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Lecture
Lesson
Module
Student Guide
Unit of Study
Author:
Anupama Mande
Date Added:
08/08/2020
Exploring Mansa Musa's Balancing Act Between Religion and Riches
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What did Mansa Musa care about more: god (religion) or gold (wealth)? Students will examine primary documents to delve into the motivations and priorities of Mansa Musa, the 14th-century emperor of the Mali Empire. It aims to explore whether his actions and decisions were driven primarily by religious beliefs or material wealth and power. Resource created by Emily David, Lincoln Public Schools, as part of the Nebraska ESUCC Social Studies Special Projects 2024 - Inquiry Design Model (IDM).

Subject:
Ancient History
Economics
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Nebraska OER
ESU Coordinating Council
Date Added:
06/11/2024
Finding the Invisibles: A True Story
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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Book 3 "It's A Miracle We Survived This Far"

Short Description:
First: Hold on to your sanity. I only ask you read, think, read, then think again. Connect the dots, if you will. Murdered for beliefs? Absolutely—and ongoing. Read on if you have the stomach for torture described in this edition but it may be too much for some readers.We are not supposed to know the real history.

Long Description:
“I don’t know about you but I have plenty of paperback and hard covers,” says Trace Hentz, author of the book series “It’s A Miracle We Survived This Far.”

Her new book FINDING THE INVISIBLES is published in blog posts (and available as a pdf or epub.) https://www.findingtheinvisibles.com

“I am a researcher and historian, not an academic. I read more than I will ever write. I found something so remarkable and terrifying, it all came together in this new book.

“It was not what I had planned for my life but now I see it was a bigger plan to make this book and research part of my book series. I am as shocked as anyone. No, it’s not going to be on Amazon, who rejected (and blocked) an early draft. No, it’s not the normal way to publish a book but I am not normal,” Hentz said.

Hentz is the founder and publisher of BLUE HAND BOOKS (2011-2022) which publishes Native American writers and storytellers. Their website: www.bluehandbooks.org

“With the chaos of too many books and the expense of buying books, I reject and defy what is expected for any new book,” Hentz said. “If it’s good, it will travel. People who are meant to read it will.”

Hentz is the author or “Mental Midgets/Musqonichte” (2019) and “What Just Happened” (2021) in the It’s A Miracle… book series, for sale as paperbacks and ebooks with online booksellers. Her first book series “Lost Children of the Indian Adoption Projects” is also available online and at bookstores.

“What I found is so shocking, it needs to be formatted for easy reading, so the reader can digest and think, over a period of time.” “Yes, this is a departure from traditional publishing formats, and I think many others will do this, eventually. A website can be accessed easily by phone or computer. Each chapter can be read at your leisure, which is the whole point,” Hentz said.

For More Information: bluehandbooks@outlook.com

Word Count: 50300

(Note: This resource's metadata has been created automatically by reformatting and/or combining the information that the author initially provided as part of a bulk import process.)

Subject:
Ancient History
History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Blue Hand Books
Date Added:
05/01/2022