Updating search results...

Search Resources

31 Results

View
Selected filters:
  • WY.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.1d - Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, cla...
Global Nomads Group: Social Change Curriculum (One Week Lesson Plan)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

Social change, at its core, does not come from one event or incident, but the long, sustained work of individuals and groups in numerous sectors of society. How do we, as youth, participate in sustaining positive social change in our communities?

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Date Added:
04/04/2014
Global Nomads Group: Sustainable Energy Curriculum (Semester-Long Program)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

How can we, as youth, build a sustainable future while meeting the energy needs of today? The Path to Sustainable Energy (PaSE) curriculum explores sustainable energy as students investigate place-based energy resource and consumption issues, gather resources, and build leadership skills to identify and take action on shared challenges and impacts of energy usage.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Date Added:
04/04/2014
Grade 11 ELA Module 3
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

In Module 11.3, students engage in an inquiry-based, iterative process for research. Building on work with evidence-based analysis in Modules 11.1 and 12.2, students explore topics that have multiple positions and perspectives by gathering and analyzing research based on vetted sources to establish a position of their own. Students first generate a written evidence-based perspective, which will serve as the early foundation of what will ultimately become a written research-based argument paper. The research-based argument paper synthesizes and articulates several claims using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence to support the claims. Students read and analyze sources to surface potential problem-based questions for research, and develop and strengthen their writing by revising and editing.

Find the rest of the EngageNY ELA resources at https://archive.org/details/engageny-ela-archive .

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
09/15/2014
Grade 11 ELA Module 4
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

In this module, students read, discuss, and analyze literary texts, focusing on the authors’ choices in developing and relating textual elements such as character development, point of view, and central ideas while also considering how a text’s structure conveys meaning and creates aesthetic impact. Additionally, students learn and practice narrative writing techniques as they examine the techniques of the authors whose stories students analyze in the module.|

Find the rest of the EngageNY ELA resources at https://archive.org/details/engageny-ela-archive .

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
11/13/2014
Grade 12 ELA Module 3
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

In Module 12.3, students engage in an inquiry-based, iterative research process that serves as the basis of a culminating research-based argument paper. Building on work with evidence-based analysis in Modules 12.1 and 12.2, students use a seed text to surface and explore issues that lend themselves to multiple positions and perspectives. Module 12.3 fosters students’ independent learning by decreasing scaffolds in key research lessons as students gather and analyze research based on vetted sources to establish a position of their own. Students first generate a written evidence-based perspective, which serves as the early foundation of what will ultimately become their research-based argument paper.

Find the rest of the EngageNY ELA resources at https://archive.org/details/engageny-ela-archive .

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
04/09/2015
Grade 12 ELA Module 4
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

In this 12th grade module, students read, discuss, and analyze four literary texts, focusing on the development of interrelated central ideas within and across the texts. |The mains texts in this module include|A Streetcar Named Desire|by Tennessee Williams, “A Daily Joy to Be Alive” by Jimmy Santiago Baca, “The Overcoat” by Nikolai Gogol, and|The Namesake|by Jhumpa Lahiri. As students discuss these texts, they will analyze complex characters who struggle to define and shape their own identities. The characters’ struggles for identity revolve around various internal and external forces including: class, gender, politics, intersecting cultures, and family expectations.|

Find the rest of the EngageNY ELA resources at https://archive.org/details/engageny-ela-archive .

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
07/14/2015
Lenses of Vietnam: Protest in a Democracy [Inquiry Design Model (IDM) Unit Plan]
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

This inquiry takes students through an analysis and evaluation of the Compelling Question “Is protest important in a democracy?” using the Vietnam War as a lens to approach the topic. To accomplish this, students will become more media literate through evaluating sources, biases, perspectives, and the goals of creating media. Throughout the inquiry, students will engage in activities designed to promote and develop media literacy while analzying the Compelling Question and learning about the historical protests of the Vietnam Era.This inquiry is expected to take two weeks (10 periods) to complete: one 45-minute class period to stage the question, introduce the inquiry, and to review media literacy; two 45-minute class periods for each of the three supporting questions; and then three 45-minute class periods for students to write and research their argumentative thesis. If students are as of yet less familiar with media literacy, the instructor should add at least another class period, or more, introducing them more fully to this.The full unit, along with all materials and resources, is available as a PDF attachment.

Subject:
Anthropology
Cultural Geography
History
Political Science
Social Science
Sociology
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Module
Primary Source
Reading
Unit of Study
Author:
Adam MacDonald
Date Added:
06/23/2020
Postcolonial Literature Lesson - Remix
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This lesson will introduce students to postcolonial literature--the major players, unifying themes, and major debates surrounding the classification of this genre. It also contains links to readings, discussion questions, and a collaborative project aligned to multiple Common Core standards.

Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Reading
Date Added:
04/02/2013
Structure and Detail in "A Long Thin Line"
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

This set of lessons extends over a few days. Students read and annotate Ernie Pyle's "A Long Thin Line of Anguish." Students complete a SAYS/DOES graphic organizer, working on summarizing the text, noticing the choices the author makes about use of details, and describing the choices the author makes regarding the structure of the article.

Students complete a SOAPStone handout, identifying subject, occasion, author, purpose, speaker and tone (SOAPStone is a pre-AP/AP strategy). Students develop claims about why Ernie Pyle makes the writing choices he makes. Students write an informal, free-response style assessment about the impact of Pyle's choices.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Utah Education Network
Date Added:
08/10/2013
What's in a Name
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

Based on the Wyoming PBS program What’s in a Name, students will view episodes of the program to learn about how Wyoming towns got their names. In the introductory video Phil Roberts from the University of Wyoming introduces the PBS series entitled “Main Street Wyoming: What’s in a Name”. This introductory clip discusses how early explorers first named the rivers, streams, and mountain ranges and passes of Wyoming. Students will then work as a group to create a fictitious Wyoming town.

Subject:
English Language Arts
History
Speaking and Listening
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Provider:
Wyoming PBS
Date Added:
09/18/2019