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10th Grade Literature and Composition : Novel Research
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10th Lit Comp 10 Lit Novel Research. Novel Research. Introduction MLA Format Plagiarism and Finding Credible Sources Plagiarism Evaluating Web Resources Choosing a Novel Writing a Literary Analysis Assignments Review Novel Research Paper Requirements

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Georgia Virtual
Author:
Georgia Virtual School
Date Added:
06/01/2018
1904 World’s Fair—Exhibition of the Igorot Filipino People
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After the Philippine-American War ended in 1902, Americans became fascinated by the natives of the newly acquired territory, which led to the development of anthropological exhibits showcasing what “primitive” life was like in the Philippines. During this time period, anthropologists adopted an evolutionary perspective rooted in white superiority. One of the exhibits featured the Igorot people, who anthropologist Albert Jenks believed were the most uncivilized tribe in the Philippines. These exhibits/human zoos sparked the creation of negative stereotypes of both the Igorot people and the Filipino community. Students will view the video segment from Asian Americans and engage in activities and discussions to explore the power of perception and its impact on shaping the identities of Asian Americans. Students will also examine the U.S. politics and scientific theories that shaped the perception of Americans and sought to justify U.S. colonization in the Pacific and the mistreatment of the Filipino community.

2021 Social Science Standards Integrated with Ethnic Studies:
Civics and Government: HS.2, HS.9
Historical Knowledge: 5.22, 6.20, 6.21, 8.22, 8.25, HS.52, HS.63, HS.64
Historical Thinking: 5.24, 7.25, 8.31, HS.67, HS.70
Social Science Analysis: 5.26, 5.27, 6.24, 7.27, 8.33, 8.34, 8.36, HS.72, HS.73, HS.74, HS.78

Subject:
English Language Arts
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
The Asian American Education Project
Date Added:
02/02/2023
25 Things
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This lesson will allow students to select and share what details are important on a topic.  Groups of students will research a topic and then discuss and determine the top 25 important things someone should know about the topic.

Subject:
Applied Science
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Career and Technical Education
Education
English Language Arts
History
Life Science
Mathematics
Physical Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Lynn Ann Wiscount
Erin Halovanic
Vince Mariner
Date Added:
07/07/2020
5 Mini-Lessons You MUST Teach for Creative Narrative
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Mini-lessons are a great way to teach students about small tidbits of writing without overwhelming them. These sessions are 10-15 minutes long, which is the perfect amount of time to engage students without them losing interest. Lesson ideas include Character Development, Setting Development, Sequence of Events, Dialogue, Strong Endings

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Date Added:
06/25/2019
AAPI Women Voices: Identity & Activism in Poetry
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Through this unit, students will explore Asian American and Pacific Islander (“AAPI”) women’s poetry in order to craft and inspire their own poetry. After analyzing and interpreting poems, students recognize poetry as a vehicle to express their own untold stories about events small and large.
This unit will expose students to voices of AAPI women poets. Their experiences will help facilitate a dialogue of identity, beauty, tradition and activism. Many students face these issues during this pivotal time of their development.
Furthermore, this unit will help students explore their viewpoints as they craft and design their own poems and explore the readings. This unit allows students of all abilities and intersectionalities to make their voices heard and draw from their unique perspectives.

2021 Social Science Standards Integrated with Ethnic Studies:
Civics and Government: 7.5, HS.2, HS.11
Geography: 6.14, HS.51
Historical Knowledge: 6.21, 8.22, 8.25, HS.63, HS.64, HS.65, HS.66
Historical Thinking: 7.25, 8.32
Social Science Analysis: 6.24, 6.27, 7.28, 7.29, 8.36, HS.78

Subject:
English Language Arts
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Author:
The Asian American Education Project
Date Added:
02/01/2023
APA Style Guide
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The standard citation style guide book for the fields of business, education, health science, public service, and social science is the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition, 2010. The American Psychological Association (APA) publishes the manual. We commonly refer to it as "the APA Manual".

The business, education, health science, public service, and social science departments at IRSC recommend APA format for papers written in these fields.

Two types of citations are included in most research papers: citations within the text of the document and a list of reference citations at the end of the paper.

In-Text Citations:

The APA Manual uses the author-date citation system for in-text citations.

Reference Citations:

The sources you use in your work are included as a separate list at the end of the paper. The APA Manual suggests using the title, References, for the list.

Subject:
Education
English Language Arts
Higher Education
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Indian River State College
Date Added:
01/12/2016
Abridged Scholarly Edition of the 1860 "The Tragedy of Hamlet"
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"The Tragedy of Hamlet" is, first and foremost, a text to be performed. William Shakespeare intended for the text to be seen in performance, not read, and all of the early texts have no reliable connection to Shakespeare's editorial authority.

In light of this, from the very earliest printings, editors have chosen to edit the play's text for particular purposes: to make a quick buck, to memorialize a recently deceased friend, to conform to a time period's unique aesthetic, or to attempt to reconstitute what Shakespeare might have intended in an ideal version of the play.

This particular edition is focused on the student who wants to read the play quickly. The edition is unabashedly abridged. "The Tragedy of Hamlet" is a long play, and, in a time of increasingly compressed curricula, a maximal edition can often take a long time to get through in class. Nearly all performances of the play, both on stage and screen, feel empowered to reduce the size of the play. The Zeffirelli film cuts the play's text by half. Moreover, if we use"Romeo and Juliet"s prologue as a guide that most of Shakespeare's plays were approximately two hours in length, then that suggests that "Hamlet," which can easily reach four-hour run-times in a "full-text" version, can be cut in half and still be coherent.

Therefore, this is a performative textual edition. It cuts the text by 50% but doesn't dumb down Shakespeare's language by modernizing spelling or altering the syntax. In particular, this edition has removed the Fortinbras subplot. Teachers and students should be aware that this removes a significant political theme in the play. It also removes a Hamlet soliloquy and a key foil for Hamlet's character.

This edition is based on the 1860 Globe edition because of its free availability. Later editions (both full-text and abridged) might eventually be offered that are based on a critical conflation of early texts in order to arrive at an ideal authorial-intent text.

Importantly, this edition has the advantage of including textual annotations to help the student understand difficult vocabulary, syntax, and cultural allusions. In this last regard, the edition attempts to be more useful than other online texts of the play that might be freely available but lack helpful guidance for the reader.

Other contextual material are provided to help the student understand early appreciations of the play.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Primary Source
Date Added:
03/08/2016
Academic English
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Academic/Business English is designed as a practical course to develop an authentic understanding of how to use concepts of writing and discourse to communicate in the workforce. Students will have the ability to express their thoughts, feelings, and opinions in using real-life situations and learning scenarios. All new concepts will be introduced in context while incorporating various writing, speaking and listening activities.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Date Added:
04/16/2018
Academic English - Remix for 9th Graders
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Academic/Business English is designed as a practical course to develop an authentic understanding of how to use concepts of writing and discourse to communicate in the workforce. Students will have the ability to express their thoughts, feelings, and opinions in using real-life situations and learning scenarios. All new concepts will be introduced in context while incorporating various writing, speaking and listening activities.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Date Added:
05/15/2019
Active Reading through Self-Assessment: The Student-Made Quiz
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Some Rights Reserved
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This recurring lesson encourages students to comprehend their reading through inquiry and collaboration. They choose important quotations from the text and work in groups to formulate "quiz" questions that their peers will answer.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
09/25/2013
Advanced Professional Writing Course
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Practical writing for the world of work. Includes business correspondence to technical reports. Analyze and create written digital products. Focus on understanding the audience for effective communication. Extensive critical reading and writing about workplace texts. Emphasis on fluency in critical writing. Includes research skills and writing a critical, documented report. Prerequisites: ENG101 or 101A or 103 or 136. Reading Proficiency.

COURSE CONTENT:

Writing skills: active verbs, specific details, imperative tone, parallelism, and information literacy
Workplace communication skills: memorandums, business letters, e-mails, blog posts, etc.
Outline development
Graphical integration: instructions, presentations
Technical project skills: research, reports, proposals
Audience and rhetorical situation
Workplace dynamics
Content production and delivery processes

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Demonstrate practical writing skills for workplace proficiency. (1, 2)
Create digital and written communication documents integrating data. (2)
Use organizational strategies to support the creation of written and digital workplace documents for a variety of purposes. (3)
Write effective instructions incorporating graphics to communicate with peers and clients. (4)
Locate and evaluate information to support workplace documents. (5)
Analyze and interpret information to support workplace documents. (5)
Integrate and document information to support workplace documents. (5)
Analyze the rhetorical situation of digital and written communication to adapt for internal and external audiences; hierarchies and roles; and for psychological, social, cultural, and political factors. (6)
Examine dynamics of organizational psychology in the workplace for the purpose of improving communication. (7)
Analyze written documents, digital content, and oral presentations in order to examine the content production and delivery processes of the workplace writer. (8)

Subject:
Business and Communication
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Author:
Karen Palmer
Tina Luffman
Date Added:
09/26/2023
African American Protest Poetry, Freedom's Story, TeacherServe®, National Humanities Center
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Given the secondary position of persons of African descent throughout their history in America, it could reasonably be argued that all efforts of creative writers from that group are forms of protest. However, for purposes of this discussion, Defining African American protest poetrysome parameters might be drawn. First—a definition. Protest, as used herein, refers to the practice within African American literature of bringing redress to the secondary status of black people, of attempting to achieve the acceptance of black people into the larger American body politic, of encouraging practitioners of democracy truly to live up to what democratic ideals on American soil mean. Protest literature consists of a variety of approaches, from the earliest literary efforts to contemporary times. These include articulating the plight of enslaved persons, challenging the larger white community to change its attitude toward those persons, and providing specific reference points for the nature of the complaints presented. In other words, the intention of protest literature was—and remains—to show inequalities among races and socio-economic groups in America and to encourage a transformation in the society that engenders such inequalities. For African Americans, Some of the questions motivating African American protest poetrythat inequality began with slavery. How, in a country that professed belief in an ideal democracy, could one group of persons enslave another? What forms of moral persuasion could be used to get them to see the error of their ways? In addition, how, in a country that professed belief in Christianity, could one group enslave persons whom Christian doctrine taught were their brothers and sisters? And the list of “hows” goes on. How could white Americans justify Jim Crow? Inequalities in education, housing, jobs, accommodation, transportation, and a host of other things? In response to these “hows,” another “how” emerged. How could writers use their imaginations and pens to bring about change in the society? Protest literature, therefore, focused on such issues and worked to rectify them. Poetry is but one of the media through which writers address such issues, as there are forms of protest fiction, drama, essays, and anything else that African Americans wrote—and write.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson
Reading
Author:
National Humanities Center
Trudier Harris
Date Added:
05/03/2019
African American Women Unite for Change (Teaching with Historic Places) (U.S. National Park Service)
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As a historic unit of the National Park Service, the Mary McLeod Bethune Council House is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The site also is within the boundaries of the Logan Circle Historic District. This lesson is based on the Historic Resources Study for Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site, as well as other materials on Bethune and the National Council of Negro Women. The lesson was written by Brenda K. Olio, former Teaching with Historic Places historian, and edited by staff of the Teaching with Historic Places program and Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site.

Subject:
Education
English Language Arts
Gender and Sexuality Studies
History
Political Science
Reading Informational Text
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
National Park Service
Author:
Brenda K. Olio
Date Added:
01/19/2022
All About Me
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In this lesson plan, the traditional autobiography writing project is given a twist as students write alphabiographies—recording an event, person, object, or feeling associated with each letter of the alphabet. Students are introduced to the idea of the alphabiography through a presentation giving the instructions of how to create guidelines for writing their own alphabiographies. Students create an entry for each letter of the alphabet, writing about an important event from their lives. After the entry for each letter, students sum up the stories by writing the life lessons they learned from the events. Since this type of autobiography breaks out of chronological order, students can choose what has been important in their lives. And since the writing pieces are short, even reluctant writers are eager to write!

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Assessment
Date Added:
01/21/2016
All's Well that Sells Well: A Creative Introduction to Shakespeare
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Students compare attending a performance at The Globe Theater with attending a modern theater production or movie. They then create a commercial for an Elizabethan audience promoting a modern product.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
09/25/2013
American Authors in the Nineteenth Century: Whitman, Dickinson, Longfellow, Stowe, and Poe
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A selection of Library of Congress primary sources exploring the topic of American authors in the nineteenth century, including Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Edgar Allan Poe. This set also includes a Teacher's Guide with historical context and teaching suggestions. A selection of Library of Congress primary sources exploring the topic of American authors in the nineteenth century,...

Subject:
English Language Arts
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Primary Source Set
Date Added:
08/19/2022