Titanic + Puppets

Lesson Title: Titanic

Grade Level: 5th

Core Subject Area: Language Arts                   Fine Arts Subject Area: Theater/Puppetry

 

Standards Alignment

Content Area Standard(s): LA 5.1.6.b, LA 5.1.6.0, LA 5.2.1.a, 5.1.2.h, 5.1.2.j, LA 5.2.2.a, LA 5.2.2.d,

LA 5.2.2.e, LA 5.3.1.a, LA 5.3.1.b, LA 5.3.2.a, LA 5.3.3.e

Fine Arts Standard(s): FA 5.5.1.a, FA 5.5.1.b, FA 5.5.1.c, FA 5.5.1.e, FA 5.5.1.f, FA 5.5.2.a, FA

5.5.2.b, FA 5.5.2.c, FA 5.5.2.d, FA 5.5.2.e, FA

5.5.2.f, FA 5.5.2.g

Core Subject Vocabulary: character, setting, plot, conflict, resolution

Fine Arts Vocabulary: script, playwright, dialogue, stage direction, acting, puppetry, props, costume, backdrop

Core Subject Learning Objectives:

  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the elements of a fictional character, setting, plot, and conflict and resolution.

Fine Arts Learning Objectives:

  • Students will create a fictional character by conducting research (character analysis)

  • Students will construct a puppet out of felt

  • Students will demonstrate and understanding of the elements of script writing, puppetry, and acting.



 

Day 1: Character Analysis

  • Bellringer: (Who is your favorite character from a book? Why are they your favorite? What do you like about that character?) Prompt students to think about elements of a good character.

  • Make a list: Interesting characters (What’s known about them) background story, physical traits, personality traits, social and economic status, age, ethnicity, age, gender, family dynamic, occupation

  • Complete a “reverse” character analysis with students. Students will use a brainstorming map to create a fictional, but realistic character that could have been a passenger on the Titanic.

  • Students will research common occupations of real first, second, and third class passengers on the RMS Titanic. They will perform character analysis on real passengers. This information will help with the creation of their fictional characters.

  • Students will answer questions such as: How old is your passenger? What is your passenger’s name? Family? Age? Gender? Who is your passenger traveling with and why are they traveling? What is your passenger’s occupation? What is the Conflict your character faces on the Titanic? What is the resolution?

  • Students will use this information to think about how it will affect their character’s actions, interactions, and reactions in the story.

 

Day 2: Felt Puppets

  • Students will bring their characters to life by constructing felt puppets.

  • The teacher will share an example of a completed puppet. “This is Rosa Parks. I took everything I knew about this character and represented it in the details of my puppet. I showed the time period she lived in by selected an outfit from that time in history. Her outfit also reveals her ethnicity, age, and social status. The color of the felt shows her African heritage. Etc.

  • Explain how to make a felt puppet: 1. Pick your materials 2. Trace puppet template on your felt. 3. Cut out the template on the felt. 4. Sew around the edge of the puppet (model), leaving the bottom open for your hand to fit in to. 5. Give students time to add details to their puppets.

 

Day 3: Script Analysis

  • Bell Ringer: Play a clip for the Shrek: The Musical. Draw the students’ attention to things the actors are saying, their actions, and their facial expression. “How do you think they know what to do on stage?”

  • Introduce theater vocabulary: script, playwright, dialogue, stage direction, acting, puppetry, props, costume, backdrop (PowerPoint)

  • Hand out a copy of the adapted version of Shrek: The Musical. Skim through the script and highlight elements such has character names, narration, dialogue, setting, scene, acts, and stage direction.

  • Read the script to the class as they follow along and model appropriate transitions and expression.

  • Ask the questions, “How did the play make you feel? Why do think it made you feel that way? What can you infer about each character? How do you know Shrek is grumpy, for example? What evidence can you find in the script?” (Kissel, 2000)

  • Discuss how language and inflection reveal things about a character’s personality. How a character reacts or interacts with other subjects also reveal a lot about a character.

  • Students will apply what was learned in this analysis to an original script. They will ask themselves these questions to help them develop the characters they created.

 

Day 4: Script Writing

  • Brainstorm: Students will brainstorm a list of characters, a scenario, plot (problem, solution),

and setting with a group.

  • Draft: Together students will construct a script using the characters created during the previous lesson.

  • The teacher will converse with each group offer guidance during the drafting process.

  • Students will work through the writing process and type the final copy of their script in a google document.

  • Students will sit in a circle with their group members and read through the final script, checking for errors and negotiating elements of their play answering questions such as: Did that make sense? What more could I do to bring my puppet alive. What movements look good. How could I show different feelings with my puppet? etc.

 

Day 5: Performance

  • Students will take turns performing their plays for an audience.

  • After each play, peers are going to highlight three things they loved and suggest one thing they could do better.


 

Name Date Fiction Literary Terms TEST

 

  1. A character is:


 

  1. a person or animal in a story, a play, or another literary work


  2. a figure of speech in which an object or animal is spoken of as if it had human feelings

 

  1. the vantage points from which a story is told


  2. a figure of speech in which an object or animal is spoken of as if it had human feelings

 

  1. The climax of a story is:


 

  1. the way a writer reveals the personality of a character


  2. a figure of speech in which an object or animal is spoken of as if it had human feelings

 

  1. a struggle between opposing characters or opposing forces


  2. the point in a story that creates the greatest suspense or interest Synonym-turning point

 

  1. Conflict is:


 

  1. the way a writer reveals the personality of a character


  2. the vantage points from which a story is told


  3. a struggle between opposing characters or opposing forces

  4. the series of related events that make up a story

 

  1. External conflict is:


    1. a character struggles within his/her own mind. It is a struggle between opposing needs, desires, emotions, etc.


    2. a character struggles with an outside force which may be another character, society as a

whole, or a natural force.


  1. the vantage points from which a story is told


  2. None of these


 

  1. Internal conflict is:


    1. a character struggles within his/her own mind. It is a struggle between opposing needs, desires, emotions, etc.


    2. a character struggles with an outside force which may be another character, society as a whole, or a natural force.


    3. the vantage points from which a story is told


    4. None of these

 

  1. A figure of speech is:


 

  1. the series of related events that make up a story


  2. the main character in a work of literature


  3. the time and place of a story, play, or narrative poem


  4. a word or phrase that describes one thing in terms of another and is not meant to be taken as literally true

 

  1. A metaphor is:


    1. a comparison between two unlike things in which one thing becomes another thing


    2. a comparison between two unlike things, using a word such as like, as, than, or

resembles

  1. a figure of speech in which an object or animal is spoken of as if it had human feelings


  2. the overall atmosphere or feeling of a work of literature

 

  1. A simile is:


    1. a comparison between two unlike things in which one thing becomes another thing


    2. a comparison between two unlike things, using a word such as like, as, than, or resembles

    3. a figure of speech in which an object or animal is spoken of as if it had human feelings


    4. the overall atmosphere or feeling of a work of literature

 

  1. Personification is:


    1. a comparison between two unlike things in which one thing becomes another thing


    2. a comparison between two unlike things, using a word such as like, as, than, or resembles

    3. a figure of speech in which an object or animal is spoken of as if it had human feelings


    4. None of these

 

  1. The plot of a story is:


 

  1. the series of related events that make up a story


  2. the main character in a work of literature


  3. the time and place of a story, play, or narrative poem


  4. a word or phrase that describes one thing in terms of another and is not meant to be understood as literally true

 

  1. The resolution of a story is:


  1. the final point of a story. The conflict is resolved, and the story is brought to a close


  2. problems that arise in a plot of a story when the characters take steps to resolve the conflict.

 

  1. the part of a plot that introduces the characters and their problems or conflicts.


  2. the time and place of a story, play, or narrative poem


 

  1. The point of view is:


 

  1. the main character in a work of literature


  2. the time and place of a story, play, or narrative poem


  3. the vantage points from which a story is told


  4. a word or phrase that describes one thing in terms of another and is not meant to be taken as literally true

 

  1. Setting is:


 

  1. the main character in a work of literature.


  2. the series of related events that make up a story


  3. the attitude a writer takes toward his or her subjects, characters, and audience

  4. the time and place of a story, play, or narrative poem






 

Performance Rubric

 

1

2

3

Student used little to no expression while speaking lines and made little to no gestures with their puppet.

Student somewhat used expression while speaking lines and made some appropriate gestures with their puppet.

Student used expression while speaking lines and made appropriate gestures with their puppet.












































 

Bibliography \Adler, S., Brando, M., & Kissel, H. (2000). The art of acting.

Latshaw, George. (2000). The Complete Book of Puppetry. Dover Publications.