Author:
Nick Ziegler, Eileen Barks, Andrew Easton, Craig Hicks
Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan, Teaching/Learning Strategy
Level:
Lower Primary, Upper Primary, Middle School, High School
Tags:
  • Digital Age Pedagogy
  • ESUCC
  • NE Blended
  • Nebraska Department of Education
  • Remote Learning
  • ne-blended
  • License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike
    Language:
    English

    Remote Learning Plan: Teacher Guide

    Remote Learning Plan: Teacher Guide

    Overview

    As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, it is increasingly likely that Remote Learning may continue into the 2020-21 academic year, either in pockets or statewide. Nebraska Educational Service Units are working in collaboration with the Nebraska Department of Education to help Districts navigate these uncertain times. The purpose of this professional learning module is to help educators plan high quality remote learning experiences. It is expected to take approximately 1 hour to complete this professional learning module on Remote Learning Planning. Upon completion, you are invited to share the Remote Learning Plan you create to receive a Certificate of Completion. 

     

    Introduction

    ESU Remote Learning Support Banner

     

    Welcome to the ESUCC's Remote Learning Teacher Guide

    Purpose

    As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, it is increasingly likely that Remote Learning may continue into the 2020-21 academic year, either in pockets or statewide. Nebraska Educational Service Units are working in collaboration with the Nebraska Department of Education to help Districts navigate these uncertain times.

    The purpose of this professional learning module is to help educators plan high quality remote learning experiences. 

     

    Digital Age Pedagogy

    The resources presented here derive from the ESU-NDE Digital Age Pedagogy project.  The DAP project seeks to help educators leverage technology to transform teaching and learning. 

    Digital Age Pedagogy is a combination of best practices associated with Instructional Models (e.g., Marzano Unit Segments) enhanced with BlendEd learning instructional practices (e.g., Effective Differentiation) and the promotion of Digital Age Skills (e.g., Empowering Learners).

    The Digital Age Pedagogy website houses two online professional learning opportunities educators can access at any time, offering a range of Certification opportunities. Click here to learn more.

    What is Digital Age Pedagogy?

     

    Expected Duration

    It is expected to take approximately 1 hour to complete this professional learning module on Remote Learning Planning.

     

    Certification

    Upon completion, you are invited to share the Remote Learning Plan you create to receive a Certificate of Completion. 

     

    Attribution

    This professional learning module was created by Dr. Nick Ziegler, ESU 5 Technology Integration Specialist, in collaboration with Eileen Barks (ESU 2), Craig Hicks (ESU 13), and Andrew Easton (ESUCC) on behalf of the Nebraska Educational Service Unit Coordinating Council.

    This work is licensed under Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike. This means you may remix, tweak, and build upon this work non-commercially, as long as you credit the creator(s) and license your new creations under identical terms. For more information on Creative Commons licenses: Click Here

     

    Remote Learning Plans

    What is Remote Learning?

    Remote Learning Planning

    The resources presented in this learning module are meant to help teachers plan high quality Educational Oppotunities for students throughout emergencing remote learning. Preparing high quality Educational Opportunities looks and feels a lot like lesson planning, or unit planning, in normal times.

    Remote Learning Planning Document

     

    Each Remote Learning Plan includes:

    ComponentStudent Action
    Learning ObjectiveStudents self-assess their ability to accomplish the objective both before and after learning.
    InstructionStudents access online and/or offline readings / videos / podcasts / teacher connections.
    ProcessStudents engage with a quick check for understanding to ensure they understood the instruction.
    PracticeStudents work toward deepening their understanding of the learning objective.
    ProductStudents create a learning artifact demonstrating their ability to apply the learning objective.

     

    This Module will walk you through creating your own High Quality Remote Learning Plan. 

    Here is a planning document to help guide single Remote Learning Plans (elementary, ms/hs), and here is a planning document for multiple Remote Learning Plans organized into a larger unit

    Open one of these documents and make your own copy.

     

    Grade-Level Considerations

    It is recommended that District expectations for student Time on Task (hours of school work per day) adhere to the guidelines set forth by the Nebraska Department of Education (link to text):

    • Preschool = 1 hour per day
    • Lower Elementary = 1.5 hours per day
    • Upper Elementary = 2 hours per day
    • MS/HS = 3 to 4 hours per day (or roughly 2 hours per class per week)

    It is our recommendation that individual Remote Learning Plans be accomplishable within the daily time allotted in Lower Elementary and Preschool contexts. 

    In the Upper Elementary and MS/HS contexts, potentially students would have enough time to accomplish 2 Remote Learning Plans per class over the span of a week. 

     

    Before you Continue

    Take five minutes to glance through these example Remote Learning Plans, created by Nebraska educators. Use the filters to find one that pertains to your grade range and/or content area.

    What do you like about the Remote Learning Plan you found? 

    What might you change for your class?

    *Note: All of those examples include direct links to the documents, which you can copy and modify to meet your needs.

     

    Learning Objectives

    Learning Objectives in Remote Learning Plans

    What will students learn? 

    Remote Learning Planning Document

    The first step is identifying the Learning Objective your Remote Learning Plan will address. Please note: It is important to remain faithful to your district curriculum's scope and sequence. When identifying a learning objective for your remote learning plan, first consult your scope and sequence.

    The recommendation is to focus each Remote Learning Plan on one specific learning objective. 

    In a Math Classroom, for example, you might focus on Multiplying Polynomials.

    Or in an English Classroom, you might focus on Writing a Summary

     

    That doesn't mean, however, that you can't tie multiple learning plans together to form a cohesive unit. 

    In a World Language Classroom, for example, you might chunk a larger unit on Self Introductions into Remote Learning Plans on Polite Conversational Phrases, Describing Personalities, and Describing Physical Appearance. 

    Or in a Social Studies Classroom, you might chunk a larger unit on Ancient Greece into Remote Learning Plans on Government, Economy, and Geographic Location.

     

    Note on Differentiation, Modification, and Accomodation

    When identifying a learning objective, it is recommended to take available data on student ability into account. This will allow you to modify the learning objective and/or the student activities based on needs. Further, we recommend working with your Special Education Staff to ensure that all accomodations and modifications called for in IEPs / 504 Plans are met.

    This is true in nomal times - but the desideratum to meet individual student needs is exacerbated in a remote learning context. We can and should circumvent student frustration with work either too easy or too hard through differentiation, modification and accommodation.

     

    Student Self-Assessment

    Self-assessment is an essential component of promoting student capacity for self-regulated learning. 

    The desire is that students engage in self-assessments both at the front end and at the back end of the Remote Learning Plan. At the front end, our goal is to help inform students what they are going to learn throughout the unit. The pre-assessment also serves as a baseline from which students can then compare to their post-assessment in order to gauge growth throughout.

    Engaging students in self-assessment requires that you turn your academic learning objectives into student-friendly "I Can" statements. 

    For example:

    Here is NDE's ELA Standard for Fluency in 7th Grade:

    • LA 7.1.4 Fluency: Students will read a variety of grade-level print/digital texts fluently with accuracy, appropriate pace, phrasing, and expression to support comprehension. 

    Here is that same standard written in a student-friendly I Can statement:

    • LA 7.1.4 Fluency: I can read a variety of texts fluently and with expression. 

    *Many of our Text books include learning objectives already written in student-friendly I Can statements at the front of a unit / chapter.

    Learn More:

    The resources on the Empower Learner Page of the Digital Age Pedagogy Website walk educators through creating Empower Learner activities promoting self-assessment, goal setting, action planning and self-reflection. On that page you will find multiple Nebraska Educator Created examples. Each includes a direct link which you can make a copy of to modify to meet your needs.

     

    Before you Continue

    Reminder: Here are planning documents to help guide single Remote Learning Plans (elementary, ms/hs), and here is a planning document for multiple Remote Learning Plans organized into a larger unit

    Make a copy of one of those templates. Take a moment to identify a Learning Objective and create a student-friendly "I Can" statement.

     

    Instruction

    Instruction in Remote Learning Plans

    What content will students access to learn? 

    Remote Learning Planning Document

    Instruction Directly Addresses the Target Skill / Standard

    It is important to note that whatever the instructional materials are that you provide your students -> they must directly address the target skill / standard identified in your Remote Learning Plan. This may sound obvious, however, consider the following, real, non-example: 2nd Grade Reading - Cause and Effect

    The student-friendly learning objective is: I can find cause and effect relationships. However, the first activity asks that students read a short story and use a graphic organizer to identify a cause and effect relationship. This is a good potential Practice activity, but not Instruction. 

    The key point: we cannot rely on family members to be the sole source of Instruction. Before asking students to begin to apply the Learning Objective, we must provide them access to a high quality grade-level appropriate reading, video, podcast and/or online teacher interactions wherin the Learning Objective is explained and application of the Learning Objective is modelled. The inclusion of an Instructional segment is the key distinction between Enrichment Opportunities and Educational Opportunities (link to NDE guidance document) during Remote Learning. 

     

    High Quality Instructional Materials

    When identifying Instructional Materials addressing your Learning Objective, it is important not to throw the baby out with the bath water. You most likely have access to high quality instructional materials through your district's paid curriculum. When thinking about what readings / videos / podcasts / online teacher interactions to include, start there.

    Should you need to expand beyond the High Quality Instructional Materials provided by your district, our No 1 recommendation is to search Nebraska's OER Commons Hub. Resources there have been vetted by content area specialists and aligned to NE Standards. 

    The difficulty in Remote Learning revolves around: how will you deliver your High Quality Instructional Materials in a Remote Learning setting?

     

    High Quality Instruction

    It is important to emphasize that high quality instruction in a remote setting mirrors high quality instruction in a face-to-face setting. Key considerations include: Online vs Offline, Time on Task, and Modeling. Processing activities, like the use of graphic organizers, will be addressed in the next section.

    Online vs Offline

    The template planning documents (elementary, ms/hsunit planning) allow educators to identify both online and offline activities for Instruction, Process, Practice, and Product. Please don't feel overwhelmed by this. Potentially, students in your context all have access to the Internet and you don't need to worry about identifying offline options. However, maybe you do. We include both columns to help you think through meeting the needs of all students.

    Time on Task

    The general rule of thumb is that students will have a hard time attending to Instruction that last longer in minutes than they are years old. Hence, we can expect a 10 year old to engage with instruction that lasts up to around 10 minutes. If your learning objective is not able to be full addressed in that amount of time, it is recommended that you further break the objective down into component parts (i.e., chunking).

    Modeling

    It is important that Instruction include both a student-friendly explanation of the learning objective and also model its application. One research-based modeling strategy is talking through examples and non-examples.

    In the Math classroom, for example, modeling might look like the teacher talking through the thinking process when applying the specific skill addressed and also providing a non-example identifying a common mistake students might make.

    Or in the Social Studies classroom, modeling might look like defining key terms (e.g., Systems of Government) and talking through examples and non-examples (e.g., why the USA is an example of a representative democracy and not an oligarchy). 

     

    EdTech Tools to Consider

    EdTech Tools for Instruction

    The EdTech Tools presented above provide example activities students might accomplish either independently (accessing an instructional video, reading, or podcast) and activities that students might accomplish during live connections with students (example: teacher led video conferences). 

    Making Instruction interactive (even in an offline setting) will be explored further in the following section on Process Activities.

     

    Before you Continue

    Return to your draft Remote Learning Plan. What online and/or offline content addressing your Learning Objective will students access?

     

    Process Activities

    Process Activities in Remote Learning Plans

    How will students know if they are on the right track? 

    Remote Learning Plan: Process Activities

    The purpose of a process activity is to help students understand the instruction. Examples are included in the chart above. These activities ask students to interact with that new information presented during Instruction in some way. 

    It is crucial, especially in a Remote Learning context, that students get immediate feedback so that they know they are on the right track before continuing to the Practice segment.

    This looks different depending on whether your Instruction occurs during live connections with students, if students will access Process activities online asynchronously, or if students complete Process activites offline.

     

    Process Activities for Synchronous Instruction Online

    Ideally, we would be able to connect with all of our students via Zoom, or some other video conference software, to kick off Remote Learning Plans. During these live connections, teachers could introduce the Plan, engage students with the self-assessment, facilitate Instruction, and engage students with Process activities before students then move on to independently accomplish the Practice and Product activites.

    There are many EdTech Tools that can help facilitate Process Activities. The table above identifies multiple options. For example, students could engage with an interactive presentation using Nearpod or Peardeck to embed process activities throughout the Instruction. Alternatively, you might engage students with an Interactive Whiteboard like Jamboard, or a shared Google Slides Presenation to complete a graphic organizer. 

    In these contexts, providing students with immediate feedback feels similar to your face to face classroom. You are able to see student responses and address any misunderstandings in real time.

    The reality, however, is that it is unlikely all students will be able to attend a live connection. We turn now to online and offline ideas for process activities following asynchronous instruction.

     

    Process Activities for Asynchronous Instruction Online

    Providing students with immediate feedback is a bit more difficult in an asynchronous format.

    EdTech Tools like Quizizz, an Interactive Review platform, allow us to create a structured review of the Instruction. However, we are limited to close-ended questions. For example, in a Math classroom, students could be asked to complete five problems. Inside Quizizz, you can build in individualized feedback for incorrect answers. This allows you to explain why the correct answer is correct, or potentially address a common pitfall when applying the math concept.

    Another Tool to check out is Edpuzzle. This allows you to embedd comprehension questions into Instructional videos.

    We can still engage students with open-ended processing activities in an asynchronous context. The difficulty is getting students immediate feedback. For example, if asking students to complete a graphic organizer to help them record / represent the new information, we must also provide them with a teacher-created graphic organizer. Desirably this is accompanied by a written explanation of the answer key, or a recorded teacher video, to help those who struggled to complete the activity. 

     

    Process Activities for Asynchronous Instruction Offline

    In an offline setting, we are limited to providing students with a written answer key for Process activities (open-ended or close-ended). While this is the least desirable context, it is the only way for students to receive immediate feedback.

     

    Before you Continue

    Return to your draft Remote Learning Plan. How will students know they are on the right track?

     

      Practice Activities

      Practice Activities in a Remote Learning Plan

      What will students do to deepen their understanding? 

      Remote Learning Planning Document

      Practice Activities ask students to deepen their undrestanding of the learning objective. 

      Whether online or offline, these activities will most likely require the least amount of revision to deliver in a Remote Learning context. Whatever it was that you would have engaged students with in your face to face classroom could be incorporated into your Remote Learning Plan, assuming it directly addresses your identified learning objective.

       

      EdTech Tools to Consider:

      Remote Learning Plan: Practice Activities

       

      In the areas of Math and English Language Arts, there are many independent learning platforms that could be leveraged in an online setting to provide practice activities for students. These are great for two reasons: 1) the educator doesn't have to create the question sets and 2) many have built in feedback for students if they are struggling. Zearn is a great example of the latter for K-6 Math. 

      An important consideration with independent learning platforms is the student experience. Prodigy (1-8 Math) and Dreamscape (2-8 ELA) are two great examples of gamified independent learning platforms. These tools are highly engaging for students. Both allow educators to select the specific skill students are practicing, or allow students to progress on their own mastery path.

      Alternatively, educators can create their own question sets for students to access inside of independent review platforms, like Quizlet, or practice activities inside of a learning management system, like Canvas.

      Learning management systems are also great ways for students to turn in their work. While immediate feedback isn't necessary for Practice activites, timely feedback is. Desirably, students would receive teacher feedback on Practice activities before embarking on the Product segment of your remote learning plan.

       

      Before you Continue

      Return to your draft Remote Learning Plan. How will students deepen their understanding of the learning objective?

       

      Product Activities

      Student Products in Remote Learning Plans

      How will student show what they know? 

      Remote Learning Planning Document

       

      Product activities engage students in deeper learning through application the learning objective. Please note: we do are not proponing student creation of a 20 page essay or a 15 slide presentation. Within the context of Remote Learning, considering the NDE recommendations around Time on Task, we are thinking much smaller. 

      In a Math classroom, for example, students could create a quick worked example wherin they solve a word problem that addresses the learning objective and then explain their thought process (either orally using a tool like Flipgrid, or written). 

      In a Social Studies classoom, students investigating goods and services that governments provide might create a 1 slide presentation identifying three services that are available in their community.

       

      Product Rubrics in Remote Learning Plans

      Rubric Assessment

      As is true in the face to face classroom, it is recommended that educators use rubric assessments to provide feedback on student products. 

      Generally speaking, we tend to think about student Products in terms of 1 specific product type. Because of that, we tend to include items on our rubric that address that 1 specific product type. For example, we might require a certain number of pages to be included or require that students have sufficient white space on a poster.

      Instead, we recommend a focus on Content Items. Content Items include:

      • Definition of Key Terms
      • Illustration of Key Processes
      • Justification of Claims / Conclusions
      • Application to Real World Problems

       

      Link to Exemplars

      The following link will take you to an interactve table with 60+ examples of Product activities. These were generated from the ESU-NDE Digital Age Skills Projects during the 2018-19 and 2019-20 academic years. Each entry in that table includes a full lesson plan, the rubric used to assess student work, links to example student work, and recommendations for educators seeking to something similar in their classrooms. Click Here to view the Exemplars.

      Exemplars are filterable by Grade Range, Content Area, and Digital Age Skill. All entries are aligned to NDE Standards.

      Additionally, you can find examples of Product ideas inside our interactive table for Remote Learning Plans: Here.

       

      EdTech Tools to Consider

      Remote Learning Plan: Product Activities

      One commonly overlooked set of tools are your Learning Management Systems. Students can use your LMS to both create Products online and also digitize offline Products for online submission (example: take a picture of offline work). Utlizing your LMS would be the quickest, most efficient way to communicate the assignment, engage students in Product creation, collect student responses, and provide feedback.

      Outside of your LMS, there are tons of amazing websites / apps students can use to create a product. The ESU EdTech Toolkit is an interactive table with 150+ EdTech Tools for Student Products. These are filterable by grade-level appropriateness, tool type, content area, platform, and digital age skill. Click here to access the ESU EdTech Toolkit.

      Each entry includes a quick video introduction, brief description, quick ideas for use, and links to further tutorials.

       

      Before you Continue

      Return to your draft Remote Learning Plan. How will students show what they know?

       

      Communicating your Remote Learning Plan

      Communication in Remote Environments

      ESU Remote Learning Plan AutoGenerator

      Remote Learning Plan Autogenerator

       

      After creating the outline of your Remote Learning Plan, the next step is communicating the workflow to your students. We invite you to use the ESU Remote Learning Plan AutoGenerator (Link). 

      The AutoGenerator works using Google Forms and Google Slides. When you submit the Google Form an editable Google Slide is automatically created and shared back to you. You can then modify the Google Slide to meet your needs and print to share with students offline or link to it for students online. Multiple templates are available.

       

      Learning Management Systems

      Canvas, Schoology, and Google Classroom are three popular Learning Management Systems. These tools provide educators with an online classroom. Common functions of these three tools include the ability to: communicate assignments, provide feedback on / grade assignments, engage students in discussions, assess students with quizzes / tests, and share announcements. 

       

      Communication Tools

      Seesaw and Class Dojo are two communication tools to consider. Similar to a Learning Management System, both provide educators an online spot to communicate activities to students / parents. These tools also allow students to submit their work back to the teacher and the teacher to provide feedback.

       

      Summary & Certification

      Summary

      Remote Learning Planning Document

       

      Planning High Quality Remote Learning involves thinking through the following questions:

      - What will students learn?
      - What content will your students access to learn?
      - How will students know they are on the right track?
      - What will students do to deepen their understanding?
      - How will students show what they know?

      It is our hope that you have found this professional learning module helpful in helping you address these questions.

      You can find more Remote Learning Resources on the ESU-NDE Digital Age Pedagogy Website:

      https://sites.google.com/esu5.org/digitalagepedagogy

       

      Remote Learning Teacher Guide Certification

      Certificate of Completion

      Remote Learning Module Completion Certificate

       

      If you desire to obtain a Certificate of Completion, fill out this Google Form: Here

       

      Attribution

      This professional learning module was created by Dr. Nick Ziegler, ESU 5 Technology Integration Specialist, in collaboration with Eileen Barks (ESU 2), Craig Hicks (ESU 13), and Andrew Easton (ESUCC) on behalf of the Nebraska Educational Service Unit Coordinating Council.

      This work is licensed under Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike. This means you may remix, tweak, and build upon this work non-commercially, as long as you credit the creator(s) and license your new creations under identical terms. For more information on Creative Commons licenses: Click Here