Author:
Dana John, Angela Anderson, Beth Clothier, John Sadzewicz
Subject:
Educational Technology, English Language Arts, Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Activity/Lab, Lesson, Lesson Plan
Level:
High School
Tags:
  • Author
  • Point-of-view
  • Voice
  • Who Am I Online Unit
  • wa-ela
  • License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Downloadable docs, Text/HTML

    Education Standards

    Authorship - Who Tells the Story?

    Authorship - Who Tells the Story?

    Overview

    Students will practice looking at a topic from multiple points of view, and will discuss whose voices are amplified and whose voices are silenced.   This lesson is part of a media unit curated at our Digital Citizenship website called "Who Am I Online?".

     

     

    Lesson Objective/Student Target:

    Students will be able to identify and analyze different authors around a single topic.

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.6
    Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.

    Overarching Question:

     Whose voice do we hear in digital media?

    Key Vocabulary:

    Point of View- Conveys the feelings, attitude, or opinion of the writer about content.

    Author- the writer or speaker of published content.

    Voice-Conveys the feelings, attitude, or opinion of the writer about content.

    Materials:

    4 pieces butcher paper
    Markers
    Printed out information from Google Slides
    Neoliberalism
    Immigrant Demographics
    Refugee experience
    Community experience
    10 hard copies questions to consider

    Content Objective:

    Students will be able to identify and analyze different authors around a single topic.

    Language Objective:

    Students will be able to discuss and write responses to artifacts around a single topic.

    Before Beginning:

    1. Set up 4 Corners (4 pieces of butcher paper in corners of the room) and tape slides
    2. Print, cut out and laminate tweets/texts for students to use in class.  See Text or Tweet sort suggestions.

    Pre assessment/Background knowledge:

    Intro set:  Either individually or in small groups, write a statement you have heard about human migration patterns.  Name where you’ve heard this statement.

    Teacher- on board write the statements that the students have shared.

    NOTE:  This activity can be adapted for any topic- I used human migration as an example.

    Activity:

    Four Corner Activity

    1. On four pieces of butcher paper, mount the information on slides.  Each paper will have an artifact.  As the students move around the room they will respond to prompts from the teacher, more details are outlined in the rounds. 
    2. Divide the students into four groups. The groups will interact to a prompt at each poster.  They will read/ listen to the prompt, discuss, and then take notes.  The groups will move clockwise around the room.
      Round 1: Read and respond.
      Initial reactions to what is viewed/ read                                              
      Round 2: What background do you think you know about this poster?
      Encourage students to share from what they’ve learned from other classes/ interactions
      Round 3: Where do you hear this voice? How frequently?
      Identify who the voice is- is this a surprise?   A known voice?
      Round 4:  Thoughts on the other groups’ comments (Add?  Change?)
      What information hasn’t been addressed in the first three rounds OR react to the others’ comments.

    Scaffolds:

    The pages could be passed from table to table if class works better stationary.

    Check for Understanding:

    Choose two of the discussion questions to answer in pairs after the activity, in terms of what you’ve learned.

    Resources:

    This lesson is part of a larger unit on Digital Citizenship called "Who Am I Online?". To see the full lesson in context with the rest of the unit, visit our Google Site.

    Taranath, A. (2019). Beyond guilt trips: Mindful travel in an unequal world. Between the Lines.

     

     

     

    Lesson Objective/Student Target:

    Students will be able to identify and analyze different authors around a single topic.

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.6
    Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.

    Overarching Question:

     Whose voice do we hear in digital media?

    Key Vocabulary:

    Point of View- Conveys the feelings, attitude, or opinion of the writer about content.

    Author- the writer or speaker of published content.

    Voice-Conveys the feelings, attitude, or opinion of the writer about content.