Author:
Michele Doctor, Alicia Tonasket
Subject:
World Cultures, English Language Arts, Reading Informational Text, History, Social Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Level:
Middle School
Tags:
  • Argument Writing
  • Inquiry Based Model
  • Native American Mascot Debate
  • Policial Cartoons
  • wa-ela
  • wa-social-studies
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Text/HTML, Video

    Education Standards

    Native American Mascot Debate Inquiry Design Model (IDM)

    Native American Mascot Debate Inquiry Design Model (IDM)

    Overview

    This inquiry takes students through analysis and evaluation of the Compelling Question “Should Washington State Ban the use of Native American mascots in their schools?” Students will be learning about the persuasive techniques of Political Cartoons, analyzing articles and images, reading interviews, and watching YouTube videos. The summative performance task is writing a letter to the Washington State Board of education stating their claim on whether or not they should or shouldn't allow schools to use Native American mascots.

    Native American Mascot Debate

    This inquiry takes students through an analysis and evaluation of the Compelling Question “Should Washington State Ban the use of Native American mascots in their schools?” Students will be learning about the persuasive techniques of Political Cartoons, analyzing articles and images, reading interviews, and watching YouTube videos.

    Students first look at a group of mascots that show different cultural groups represented as mascots. This should get them thinking about the Compelling Question. Next, students will look at political cartoons that will get them thinking about what the artist is trying to share and how political cartoons can persuade. After that, students will look at images of people dressed up in Halloween costumes that some may find offensive. Then they will read articles about using Native American mascots as costumes. Finally, students will analyze if some or all protests accomplish their goals. Ultimately this will give students enough sources to use in order to address

    Throughout the inquiry, students will engage in activities designed to promote and develop media literacy. For all documents, students are asked to consider perspective, discuss the images used, and the goals of the author: what is this source trying to get me to think and is this source trustworthy? Furthermore , the media students encounter is varied (political cartoons, articles, images, videos, and interviews) in order to allow conversations between students and instructor about the techniques, methods, messaging,andperspectivesused.

    This inquiry helps students to:

    • SSS1: Uses critical reasoning skills to analyze and evaluate claims

    • SSS1.6-8.1: Analyze positions and evidence supporting an issue or an event

    • SSS1.6-8.2: Evaluate the logic of reasons for a position on an issue or event

    • SSS2: Deliberates public issues

    • C4. 6-8.3 Employ strategies for civic involvement that address a state or local issue

      This inquiry is expected to take two weeks – three weeks (10-15 periods) to complete: two 45-minute class periods to stage the question, introduce the inquiry, and to review media literacy; two 45-minute class periods for each of the three supporting questions;andthenfive45-minute class periods for students to write and research their argumentative letter. The writing process may take more time if the instructor set up peer editing and feedback throughout the writing process.

      As a whole, the unit could be lengthened by adding in the extension of having students research an issue going on in the world and create a political cartoon that captures the message they are trying to send. Materials can be modified, shortened, or amended to accommodate English language learners (ELLs) as well as students with 504s, individualized education plans (IEPs), and other special education accommodations, and more.