Author:
Beth Clothier, Angela Anderson, Dana John, John Sadzewicz
Subject:
Communication, Marketing, Educational Technology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab, Lesson Plan
Level:
High School
Tags:
  • Advertising Claim
  • Cyber Citizenship
  • Marketing Messages
  • Sponsorship
  • Who Am I Online Unit
  • License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Downloadable docs, Text/HTML

    Education Standards

    Sponsorship: This Message Brought to You By...

    Sponsorship: This Message Brought to You By...

    Overview

    Students will identify and discuss the benefits and drawbacks of sponsorship in online content and information. This lesson is part of a media unit curated at our Digital Citizenship website, "Who Am I Online?"

    What are the benefits and drawbacks of sponsorship in online content?

     

    Lesson Objective/Student Target:  

    The student will be able to identify and discuss the benefits and drawbacks of sponsorship in online content and information.

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.6

    Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.

    Updated Social Studies Standards (OSPI, 2019)

    SSS1: Uses critical reasoning skills to analyze and evaluate claims.

    Washington State Health Standard 2 (OSPI, 2016): 

    Students will analyze the influence of family, peers, culture, media, technology, and other factors on health behaviors.

    Overarching Question:

    • How do sponsors influence the information I am seeing online?
    • Who is paying for the content I am seeing, and how does that sponsorship influence the message or information being shared?

    Key Vocabulary:

    Sponsor - a person or company who pays for creation of content in exchange (typically) for advertising of a product.

    Influencer - a person in social media using their platform to create buzz to influence their followers/audience based on their popularity and air of expertise.

    Materials:

    Students will need laptops on which to access the HyperDoc links and resources.

    Students may also want headsets to watch and listen to videos individually.

    Content Objective:

    The student will be able to identify and discuss the benefits and drawbacks of sponsorship in online content and information.

    Language Objective:

    The student will read text to develop understanding.

    Pre-Assessment/Background Knowledge:

    As a pre-write to start the lesson, ask students to consider sites they’ve visited, videos and social media posts they’ve viewed over the last few days, and write down as many (school appropriate) ads and products that they can remember from their recent online activities.

    Have them pair and share, and then discuss as a larger group/class:

    • What ads and product placements are prominent right now?
    • What celebrity or influencer posts have students seen in which the product(s) advertised were disclosed (does the post include acknowledgement of having received pay or free products in exchange for a positive review)?
    • How do students feel about these products being advertised?

    Activity:

    Note: This activity includes a wide-range of tangentially related links and resources from which students are asked to make inferences and draw conclusions. The resources included here do not explicitly answer the questions listed below, but are intended to serve as a jumping off point to guide their thinking. Feel free to supplement or replace any of the links to be more current and/or appropriate to your audience.

    Session 1 (35-40 minutes):

    Share the HyperDoc with students and have them jot down the advertisers and products discussed during the entry task.

    Arrange students into small groups (4-7 per group) and have them divide up the activities in the “Explore” section, so that each of the tasks is completed by at least one member of the group.

    Allow students 10 - 15 minutes to work independently on their activity, using the HyperDoc to take notes as they go.

    Next, instruct each group to move onto a small group sharing their sources, answering together the questions in the “Explain” section of the HyperDoc.

    Optional: assign the “Elaborate/Extend” as independent reading.

    Session 2 (25 - 50 minutes):

    Continue the discussion, now as a larger group using a Socratic Seminar or Fishbowl protocol, allowing students to draw upon their notes, readings, and source material to discuss the topic of sponsorship.  The goal is to encourage students to think critically about the pros and cons of sponsorship and the ways in which it impacts what they see and interact with online. Feel free to let the conversation follow the students’ interests, but here are some possible conversation starters:

    • What makes an advertisement effective and/or memorable?
    • What is the difference between an advertisement and a sponsored product?
    • What responsibility do influencers have to disclose their sponsors?
    • How much does having sponsorship impact the decisions made in what one says or portrays?
    • How much does an athlete/celebrity get paid to be a spokesperson for a product?
    • Do they have to believe in the product to promote it?
    • In what ways might they have to change what they do or think, or how they behave to be paid?
    • In professional sports (where sponsorship is very common), do athletes rarely/ever/routinely sacrifice their personal well-being to keep their sponsors?
    • How does the sponsorship make the customer feel? (Included, part of the elite, better-than).
    • How can sponsorship and advertising influence thinking?

    Scaffolds:

    To extend this discussion for your advanced students, consider assigning further reading:

    Some students may benefit from a partially completed HyperDoc to provide them with a model of what is expected and/or reduce the amount of work required.

    Consider assigning tasks from the “Explore” section based on student readiness and current levels of ability.

    Check for Understanding:

    After the larger group discussion, have students complete the final “Evaluate” section of the HyperDoc to share their thinking and how it has changed as a result of their exploration and discussion.

    Resources:

    The following resources are the links provided in the HyperDoc, and were current at the time of the posting of this lesson. However, these could easily be replaced with up-to-date examples and resources.

    This lesson is part of a larger unit on Digital Citizenship called “Who Am I Online?”. To see the full lesson in context with the rest of the unit, visit our Google Site.

     

    Lesson Objective/Student Target:  

    The student will be able to identify and discuss the benefits and drawbacks of sponsorship in online content and information.

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.6

    Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.

    Updated Social Studies Standards (OSPI, 2019)

    SSS1: Uses critical reasoning skills to analyze and evaluate claims.

    Washington State Health Standard 2 (OSPI, 2016): 

    Students will analyze the influence of family, peers, culture, media, technology, and other factors on health behaviors.

    Overarching Question:

    • How do sponsors influence the information I am seeing online?
    • Who is paying for the content I am seeing, and how does that sponsorship influence the message or information being shared?

    Key Vocabulary:

    Sponsor - a person or company who pays for creation of content in exchange (typically) for advertising of a product.

    Influencer - a person in social media using their platform to create buzz to influence their followers/audience based on their popularity and air of expertise.