Author:
Mark Friedman
Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Reading
Level:
Community College / Lower Division
Provider:
Middlesex Community College
Tags:
  • Mass CC Social Sci
  • mass-cc-social-sci
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution
    Language:
    English

    Economics-Visuals, Syllabus, Discussion, Student Value-Added

    Economics-Visuals, Syllabus, Discussion, Student Value-Added

    Overview

    Employing visuals in conveying economics information,

    Economics-Visuals, Syllabus, Discussion, Student Value-Added

    Conveying information, traditionally, has been through text.  The theory of different learning styles has provoked complementary vehicles for conveying information such as video (YouTube), audio, experimentation, games and more.

    Images can be used to convey teaching points and this is accessible to anyone with a phone that is willing to snap a few photos during the course of their day.  The subject of the photo may be just about anything as so much of the way society is organized has an economic content.

    The three samples are:
    Rhodes-Tourism and Economics - This Word document highlights the connections between tourism, history and economics.

    Culture and Economics - This PPT highlights the connections between culture and economics.

    Economics and Macroeconomics - This Word document is an introduction to macroeconomics. 

    The syllabus is our guide through the entire course and key areas include assessment, schedule and course description.  See attached.

    Discussion carries the learning among students and the instructor.  One historical can be to carry forward discussions from previous classes so that current students can build on the thoughts of their predecessors.  

    Finally, student value-added may be demonstrated with student entries in, for example, economics topics in Wikipedia.  Students may perceive for example that the typical example of a light house being a public good because there is no way to collect a fee for its use by passing ships, is incorrect.  After all, in the modern era cars have transponders whereby highway toll fees are collected.  Ships could have the same.