Character Charting The Tempest

Character Charting The Tempest

Guiding Questions

Opening

Respond to the unit’s Guiding Questions.

  • What role do national identity, custom, religion, and other locally held beliefs play in a world increasingly characterized by globalization?
  • How does Shakespeare’s view of human rights compare with that in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights?
  • Who is civilized? Who decides what civilization is or how it’s defined?
  • How do we behave toward and acknowledge those whose culture is different from our own?

Open Notebook

Discuss your responses with your classmates.

Unit Accomplishments

Work Time

Review the Unit Accomplishments and ask your teacher any questions you have about them.

  • Read William Shakespeare’s play The Tempest and write a short argument about who in the play is truly civilized.
  • Participate in a mock trial in which you argue for or against granting asylum to a teenage refugee, and then write arguments in favor of and against granting asylum to teenage refugees.
  • Read an Independent Reading text and write an informational essay about a global issue and how that relates to your book.

Independent Reading Text

Work Time

As noted in the Unit Accomplishments, you will read an Independent Reading text and write an informational essay about a global issue and how that relates to your book.

Read the descriptions of the Independent Reading texts.

  • By Lesson 12, choose and locate a copy of the text you want to read.

You will have from Lesson 12 to Lesson 22 to read the book.

Characters and Vocabulary

Work Time

Look at the list of characters in Shakespeare’s The Tempest at the start of the play. Note that in Shakespeare’s day, the characters were listed according to rank, with kings and nobles first, followed by gentlemen, followed by workers and slaves, followed by women and then “spirits.”

  • To help you keep the characters straight, use the list of characters at the beginning of the play (the “dramatis personae”) and work with your teacher to create a Characters in The Tempest chart. Maintain a list of characters and information about them in your Notebook. Fill in information each day as you read and find out more about the characters.
  • As you run across vocabulary unfamiliar to you, note the word and where you found it in a Vocabulary in The Tempest list. Then figure out its definition. For example, the wordusurping to describe Antonio in the dramatis personae means that he has seized the position of Duke without having a legal right to do so.

Open Notebook

Act 1, Scene 1

Work Time

Silently read and annotate act 1, scene 1. Mark any words or lines you don’t understand. Find the conflict between the characters as the ship is foundering.

In your group, discuss the following questions.

  • Who’s in charge on the ship?
  • When the Boatswain tells Gonzalo, “You are a / counsellor; if you can command these elements to / silence, and work the peace of the present, we will / not hand a rope more; use your authority. If you / cannot, give thanks you have liv’d so long, and make / yourself ready in your cabin for the mischance of / the hour, if it so hap. . . . Out / of our way, I say” (1.1.19–26). Explain the Boatswain’s frustration and Gonzalo’s response. How do the other noblemen respond to the Boatswain later in the scene?
  • At the end of the scene, what seems to have happened to the ship and its passengers and sailors?

Choose one member to report to the whole class if the teacher calls on your group.

Act 1, Scene 2

Work Time

Continue with act 1, scene 2.

  • Read along silently while student readers take the parts of Miranda and Prospero.

Your teacher will interrupt the reading several times to provide explanations or to ask for responses.

Miranda and Prospero

Work Time

Complete a Quick Write in response to the following question.

  • How did Prospero and Miranda get marooned on this island?

Open Notebook

Miranda and Prospero

Closing

So, how did Prospero and Miranda get marooned on this island?

  • Confer with your small group and share your ideas in answering the Quick Write prompt.

Act 1, Scene 2

Homework

Read and annotate the remainder of act 1, scene 2.

Write two paragraphs.

  • Briefly summarize the action of the rest of scene 2.
  • Describe what one character who is not in the scene might think of the action were she or he able to observe the action.

Open Notebook

Submit your writing to your teacher.

Study the vocabulary from act 1 of The Tempest.