Author:
Renée House, April Campbell, Oregon Open Learning
Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Activity/Lab, Lesson
Level:
Upper Primary
Tags:
  • SB 13
  • Tribal History/Shared History
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Downloadable docs

    Education Standards

    Health: Cultural Bias, Stereotypes, and the Effects of Boarding Schools

    Health: Cultural Bias, Stereotypes, and the Effects of Boarding Schools

    Overview

    This lesson encourages students to begin thinking about and questioning those stereotypes. The lesson includes three activities, each of which explores a challenging but important topic related to the experience of Native Americans in Oregon. These topics touch on issues of history but are presented in the context of health because of their tremendous impact on the physical, mental, and emotional health of Native people, past and present.

    Cultural Bias, Stereotypes, and the Effects of Boarding Schools

    Children’s literature, movies, and other media often perpetuate stereotypes, whether positive or negative, in their representations of Native American people. This lesson encourages students to begin thinking about and questioning those stereotypes. The lesson includes three activities, each of which explores a challenging but important topic related to the experience of Native Americans in Oregon. These topics touch on issues of history but are presented in the context of health because of their tremendous impact on the physical, mental, and emotional health of Native people, past and present. The first activity introduces students to the concepts of bias and stereotyping. The second activity uses primary source photographs to explore what it means to be “civilized” and how Euro-Americans used this concept to dehumanize Native people. The third activity explores the Indian boarding school system and the impact of cultural assimilation. The United States has a long-standing tension between the desire to preserve the cultural heritage of its diverse population and the desire to create a homogenous “American” culture, often referred to as a “melting pot.” Native populations, however, have been outside such consideration. Indians have weathered repeated attempts to replace their cultural traditions and beliefs with those sanctioned by the U.S. government, such as federal programs removing them from their lands and the destruction of their livelihoods and ways of life. This lesson introduces students to these difficult but important topics.

    Lesson Plan

    PowerPoint Presentation

    Chemawa Boarding School Worksheet​