Author:
Out Teach
Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Upper Primary
Tags:
  • Ifthen
  • Nutrition
  • Out Teach
  • Passport
  • Science
  • License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives
    Language:
    English

    Education Standards

    You Take My Breath Away

    You Take My Breath Away

    Overview

    Students monitor and record their heart rate and breathing rate during rest, mindfulness activities, and outdoor activity. Through reading nonfiction text (or watching similar content via video) students learn about the respiratory and circulatory systems structures and functions in order to craft an individualized “Eco-exercise or Mindfulness” Plan that includes OUTDOOR exercise or mindfulness activities to keep their circulatory and respiratory systems healthy. Students begin a “Healthy Mind, Healthy Body, Healthy ME” journal that will be continued in later lessons. 

    LESSON OVERVIEW

    Students monitor and record their heart rate and breathing rate during rest, mindfulness activities, and outdoor activity. Through reading nonfiction text (or watching similar content via video) students learn about the respiratory and circulatory systems structures and functions in order to craft an individualized “Eco-exercise or Mindfulness” Plan that includes OUTDOOR exercise or mindfulness activities to keep their circulatory and respiratory systems healthy. Students begin a “Healthy Mind, Healthy Body, Healthy ME” journal that will be continued in later lessons.

    REQUIRED MATERIALS

    • 30 second online timer 

    • Timer that can be taken outdoors (phone or other) 

    • Whistle or another alert device 

    • Copies of Healthy Mind/Healthy Body Journals 

    • Copies of  Heart Rate and Breathing Rate Record, Eco-exercise Plan: Do Something Great Outdoors! and Journal Reflection #1 student sheets 

    KEY VOCABULARY

    Circulatory system, respiratory system, heart rate, pulse, respiratory rate, mindfulness 

    GUIDING QUESTIONS

    • Why do our hearts beat faster sometimes and slower other times? 

    • Why do we breathe? 

    • Is heart rate related to breathing rate?  

    • How can we keep these systems healthy? 

    ENGAGE

    Ask students: 

    • What is our pulse and what does our pulse tell us? (our pulse is a measurement of how many times our heart beats per minute. It is also known as our heart rate) 

    Show students how to take their pulse by GENTLY placing the index and middle fingers from their left hand on the thumb side of the wrist on the right hand (palm facing up). Give students several seconds to find their pulse, then start a 30 second online timer and have them count the number of heart beats they feel in that time period. Students should double their time to get their heartrate per minute. 

    Practice taking the baseline or resting pulse several times to allow students to gain the needed skill of taking their pulse to ensure accuracy. A baseline pulse should be taken after being seated and calm for at least 5 minutes. 

     

    Ask Students: 

    • What does our breathing rate tell us? 

    Show students how to measure their breathing rate by counting the number of breaths they take in 30 seconds using the online timer and then doubling that number to calculate breaths per minute. Again, the baseline or resting breathing rate should be taken after being seated and calm for at least 5 minutes. Record on the “Heart Rate and Breathing Rate Record” provided in the journal. 

    As a math integration exercise, calculate the class average baseline heart rate and breathing rate (taken while sitting in a chair for 5 minutes or more). Find the range and median for both measures. 

     

    EXPLORE

    Tell the students: 

    • Let’s find out if we can decrease our heart rate and breathing rate through mindfulness. 

    Complete a mindfulness activity with students.  

    • Resources can be found here. Specifically, try the 8-minute Meditation for Teens. Students begin this activity by lying down somewhere comfortable. Arrange for a conducive space ideally outdoors in the schoolyard or garden or alternatively in the classroom or gymnasium. Measure and record data on the “Heart Rate and Breathing Rate Record” provided in the journal using the same method immediately after ending the meditation. 

     

     

    Ask students: 

    • How did your pulse or heart rate compare before and after completing the mindfulness activity?  

    • What do you notice about your breath after the mindfulness activity? Is it slow, fast, calm, relaxed?   

    • How do you feel overall after the mindfulness activity? 

    EXPLORE continued

    Students will complete an activity of their choice in their outdoor garden for at least 20 minutes. Generate a list of activities as a class ahead of time to give students some ideas. Ultimately, students decide which activity they will complete.  

    • Examples include turning compost, moving soil, cleaning a shed, pulling weeds, planting, harvesting, watering, raking soil or leaves, etc.  

    After every 5 minutes of activity blow a whistle or use another call device, then tell students to measure their pulse and breathing rate again (in that order). Students can record this data on the “Heart Rate and Breathing Rate Record” provided in the journal. 

    Students will reflect on the following written questions after recording their data:  

    • Describe the difference between their baseline pulse, after mindfulness, and after outdoor activity. What do these differences tell us?  

     

    • Describe the difference between their baseline breathing rate, after mindfulness, and after outdoor activity. What do these differences tell us?  

     

    • Consider: What do each of these activities do to our body? What body systems are working to support these activities?

    Inform students that many of their body systems were at work when completing their activities but that today we will focus on the effect the activities had on two important body systems: circulatory and respiratory.   

    Ask Students:  

    • Why is your circulatory system considered a transport system?  

     

    Tell Students: 

    • Let’s investigate more in our next session to find out. 

    EXPLORE Continued (2)

    Students chose to either read (or listen) to non-fiction text or watch a movie and then take a quiz to provide evidence of their knowledge. The North Carolina 5th grade Science Standards specify mastery of knowledge regarding the structure and function of the following organs for each system: Circulatory System (heart, blood, vessels); Respiratory System (nose, trachea, lungs). 

    Heart and Circulatory System  

    Lungs and Respiratory System 

    Read or Listen:  

    https://kidshealth.org/en/teens/heart.html?ref=search 

    Read or Listen:  

    https://kidshealth.org/en/teens/lungs.html?ref=search 

    Movie (~ 6 minutes): https://kidshealth.org/en/kids/csmovie.html?ref=search 

    Movie (~5.5 minutes): 

    https://kidshealth.org/en/kids/rsmovie.html?ref=search 

    Quiz: 

     https://kidshealth.org/en/kids/csquiz.html?ref=search 

    Students REPORT THEIR SCORE by showing you their final screen. 

    Quiz:  

    https://kidshealth.org/en/kids/rsquiz.html?ref=search 

    Students REPORT THEIR SCORE by showing you their final screen. 

    ELABORATE

    Students work alone or in pairs to conduct research using the text and movies from the EXPLAIN phase activity (along with other internet and library resources) to craft an individualized “Eco-exercise Plan: Do Something Great Outdoors” identifying outdoor exercise or mindfulness activities aimed at the goal of keeping their circulatory and respiratory systems healthy. This plan is found in the Healthy Mind, Healthy Body, Healthy ME journal.

    CLOSURE:

    • The circulatory system consists of two primary organs: the heart and blood vessels.  
    • The main job of the circulatory system is to carry or transport nutrients and oxygen to the cells and carry or transport waste products to organs that can get rid of them. 

    • Arteries are blood vessels that carry blood away from the heart and veins are blood vessels that bring blood back to the heart.  

    • The respiratory system has three main organs: nose, trachea, lungs. 

    • The main job of the respiratory system is to take in oxygen (needed by every living cell) and release carbon dioxide (a toxic waste product). 

    • The circulatory system and respiratory system work together to bring in oxygen (respiratory system) and deliver the oxygen to the cells (circulatory). 

    EVALUATE

    In their Healthy Mind, Healthy Body, Healthy ME journal, students will show their knowledge of the circulatory and respiratory systems and their interconnectedness to construct a response to Journal Reflection #1. Students should include correct structures and functions of each system including appropriate names for the main (standards-based) organs and parts of each system and describe how these systems work together. A rubric is provided to score the responses. 

    Students will: 

    • Describe one activity (mindfulness or exercise) that they completed in this lesson.  

    • Use their knowledge of these systems to describe what the major organs were doing during the activity.  

    • Explain how the circulatory and respiratory systems working together to support that activity.  

    EXTENSIONS AND CONNECTIONS

    Extension: Students enrich and enact the developed plan and monitor baseline, mindfulness, and exercise heart rates and breathing rates over time.  

    Ask students:  

    • What will happen to your heart rate and breathing rate if you continue with this plan?  

    • How will these systems respond to regular exercise? 

    Connections. Passport Lesson#1 the digestive system is related to Lesson #2: circulatory and respiratory system.  

     

    Ask Students: 

    • How do the digestive, circulatory, and respiratory systems interact with one another?  

    Have students make a concept map or web to show how the functions of one system interact with the other systems. 

    Career Connections

    The IF/THEN collection is the world’s largest free digital library of authentic and relatable images and videos of women STEM innovators.  

     

    Dr. Jessica Fagerstrom is a Medical Physicist that specializes in radaiation therapy physics. She helps treat patients who have cancer, making sure radiation is delivered saferly and effectively. 

     

    Have your students watch this video for inspiration about pursuing STEM careers, and read this profile to learn more about Dr. Fagerstrom's story.

     

    Thank you for creating a culture shift in how the world perceives women in STEM.