Author:
Arts ESU2
Subject:
Visual Arts, Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Level:
Lower Primary
Tags:
  • Chalk
  • Civics
  • MTA
  • NE Visual Arts
  • Nebraska Department of Education
  • Patriotic
  • Stencil
  • Symbol
  • Visual Arts
  • civics
  • ne-visual-arts
  • visual-arts
  • License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike
    Language:
    English

    Education Standards

    American Symbols

    American Symbols

    Overview

    This resource was created by Sara Pittack, in collaboration with Lynn Bowder, as part of ESU2's Mastering the Arts project. This project is a four year initiative focused on integrating arts into the core curriculum through teacher education and experiential learning.

    American Symbols

    Grade Level:  2nd grade

    Core Subject Area: Social Studies

    Fine Arts Subject Area:  Visual Arts



     
     

    Standards Alignment

    Content Area Standard(s): 

    SS 2.1.2b Explain how patriotic symbols, songs, actions, celebrations, and holidays reflect democratic traditions. 

    Fine Arts Standard(s): FA 2.2.1.a Experiment and explore ideas and materials (glossa

    FA 2.2.1.e Explore various techniques, skills, and the importance of craftsmanship/workmanship (glossary)(e.g., properly hold scissors, while turning paper, to create a well-

    FA 2.2.4.d Identify how images and objects are used to convey a story, familiar experience, or connection to the world.

    Core Subject Vocabulary:

    Symbol

    American

    Monument

    President

    Statue

    Colony

    Fine Arts Vocabulary:

    Line

    Shape

    Silhouette

    Color

    Blending

    Core Subject Learning Objectives: 

    Students will be able to identify important American symbols, such as the American flag, Statue of Liberty, Bald Eagle, Mount Rushmore, etc. and explain their meaning.

    Fine Arts Learning Objectives:

    Students will:

    Use chalk correctly as a blending medium

    Use a stencil correctly to portray a national symbol

    Portray correct color progression for evening or morning sky

    Use thin and thick markers in correct order for efficiency and neatness

     

     

    Lesson -Teaching Sequence

     

    Day 1: Introduction to American Symbols


    S






     

    object

    Materials Needed:

    Day 1

    • The teacher will call students to the class carpet and ask them to watch quietly as several pictures of objects are shown. Students will be asked to think about what these objects might have in common. Once the teacher has given the students a minute to view the photos and think about connections, students will do a "turn and talk" with an elbow buddy to discuss what the items are and how they are connected.

     
    • The teacher will ask students to share what they talked about with their elbow buddies and will record their thoughts on a piece of paper. After students have shared for a couple of minutes, the teacher will review their thoughts and solidify the unit's theme of American Symbols.


    • The teacher will then show a short introductory PowerPoint presentation showing images of each of the symbols.

     

    • The teacher will define what a symbol is for the students.  Students who have relevant examples will share with the class.

     
    • Students will listen to the teacher read the relevant portions of a children’s literature book, O, Say Can You See? America's Symbols, Landmarks, and Important Words, by  Sheila Keenan.  The teacher will stop with relevant questions for the students and will point out the four American Symbols being studied in this unit.  The teacher will show the Brain Pop, Jr. video, "U.S. Symbols." The teacher will then post a definition of “symbol” (basic definition: something (often an object) that stands for something else) and pictures of the American Symbols being studied for students to refer to during the lesson. 

     
    • The teacher will explain that the students are going to compete a couple projects related to their learning over the next week. The teacher will pass out the red symbol books that the students are going to create. The students will decorate the front cover.

     
    • The students will then separate into groups and read about the first two Symbols that we are going to be talking about (Statue of Liberty and Liberty Bell) They will work together to fill out the information page based on what they learn. Once their answers are checked, they can color the picture of the symbols learned about today and add those pictures to their symbol books.

     
    • While students are finishing up expressing their knowledge, early finishers may read books about American symbols and America on Epic

    Day 2

    • The teacher will review the symbols reviewed the previous day.  

    • Students will move back into their groups and read about the next two American symbols (American Flag and Bald Eagle)

    • They will then complete the information pages about what you learned. Once their answers are checked, they can color the picture of the symbols learned about today and add those pictures to their symbol books.

    • While students are finishing up expressing their knowledge, early finishers may read books about American symbols and America on Epic

    Day 3

    • The teacher will review the symbols reviewed the previous day.  

    • Students will move back into their groups and read about the next two American symbols (The White House, Mount Rushmore)

    • They will then complete the information pages about what you learned. Once their answers are checked, they can color the picture of the symbols learned about today.

    • While students are finishing up expressing their knowledge, early finishers may read books about American symbols and America on Epic

    Day 4

    • The teacher will review the symbols reviewed the previous day.  

    • Students will move back into their groups and read about the next two American symbols (Washington Monument and Lincoln Memorial)

    • They will then complete the information pages about what you learned. Once their answers are checked, they can color the picture of the symbols learned about today.

    • While students are finishing up expressing their knowledge, early finishers may read books about American symbols and America on Epic

    Day 5

    • A quick formative exercise with students naming different American Symbols will be done

    • Teacher will ask the students, “What is a line? Students will likely name a type of line.  Then the teacher will give the students a definition by doing the following:  Ask the students to hold up their first finger and then pretend to stick it in the sand and remove it, leaving a point!  Then have students put their finger back into that point in the sand and move it.  Ask what it creates?  Their answer, a line!  So, a line is, the path of a moving point!

    • Then demonstrate to students when a line finds its starting point, it creates a shape!

    • After discussion of line and shape, ask students if they know what a silhouette is?  A shape filled in black Text

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    • Lastly in this section, discuss what a stencil is and how to use it.  




     

    Creating a Symbol at Sunset

     
    1. Demonstrate for students using chalk to create a multicolored sky with yellow at the bottom progressing to orange, red, violet, and ending at the top with blue.  These are the colors in the sky at sunrise and sunset.  After placing chalk on the surface of the paper, rub it out to blend and soften it, starting at the bottom of the paper and moving up

     
    1. Have the students drawing in pencil or trace in pencil, on top of their chalk background, a silhouette or outline of a shape of an American symbol.  Do not put the symbol in the direct center.  Move it to either side of the page.  (This will reinforce learning about composition later in their art classes)

    2. Outline the pencil lines with a thin black marker and then color in the shape all black with a thicker black marker.


    Graphical user interface

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    Additional symbols can also be added when the first one is completed.  

     

    Differentiation:  

    Students will be provided differentiation through availability of varying reading levels of books.  The teacher can provide different sets of expectations about how much students write, and the expected level of sophistication of sentences at the social studies journal station.  The multiple means of expression will give students many opportunities to show what they know at their own personal "best level."  

     

     

    Assessment and Reflection

    Content Assessment:

     

    Students will be graded based on the completion of their American symbols book.

    Arts Assessment:

     

    Rubric

    Student Reaction (Engagement):

     

    The students were very excited to do this project. They really enjoyed learning about the different state symbols and what they stand for. They loved the art project that went along with the lesson. They were focused on their project and wanted to do their very best.  They did a great job on them and said it was one of the favorite things they have done all year. 

    Teacher Reflection:

     

    I really liked teaching this unit. The class was very excited about it the entire time and very interested in learning more. It did take a bit longer than originally planned because they asked so many questions. The art integration was perfect to end the unit. 

     

    Symbol at Sunset Rubric

    5

    3

    1



     

    Colors of the sunset/sunrise

    Colors are all in correct order.  At the bottom yellow and moving up with orange, red, violet and blue

    Color progression has 1-2 colors in the wrong order

    3 or more colors are out of correct order



     

    Chalk Blending

    Chalk on page is completely blended with no smudges of color in areas they should not be

    Chalk on page is completely blended but color smudges are visible in areas they should not be creating distractions.

    Chalk is only partially blended. 

     

    Appropriate placement of symbols

    Symbols are correctly placed on paper.  Off to the side and grounded if appropriate or in the air if appropriate to the symbol

    Symbols are placed in direct center, but grounded if appropriate or in the air if appropriate to the symbol

    Symbols are just randomly placed and do not make sense

     

    Neatness of use of stencils and markers

    Symbols are very neatly outlined and colored in.

    Symbols are outlined but have some coloring outside the original outline

    Symbols are traced and outlined without care and colored in haphazardly leaving empty areas and color outside of the original outline.