Author:
steven bell
Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Assessment, Full Course, Homework/Assignment, Reading, Syllabus
Level:
Graduate / Professional
Tags:
  • Librarianship
  • Library Education
  • Masters in Library Science
  • Open Education
  • Open Education Resources
  • Scholarly Communication Notebook
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Video

    OER for LIS: Toolkit for Building an OER Librarianship Course

    OER for LIS: Toolkit for Building an OER Librarianship Course

    Overview

    Based on a one-credit, four-week asynchronous online course developed by the author for a major U.S. based library and information science masters degree program, the OER for LIS toolkit is designed for adoption and adaptation by any instructor who would like to develop an "Open Education Librarianship" course for their LIS program. It provides all the necessary materials, including a syllabus, lecture slides, video lectures, assignments, assignment rubrics, weekly discussion board topics, weekly quizzes, required and recommended readings/videos and supplemental course materials (e.g., resource list, course success tips, etc.). 

    Introduction and Overview

    Welcome to OER for LIS. This site contains all the necessary materials to reproduce a course on Open Education Librarianship for students in a Masters Degree program in Library and Information Science. Here is a bit of background information for you about the origin of this resource.

    My name is Steven J. Bell and I am the Associate University Librarian at Temple University Libraries. In my official role I have been advocating for OER since 2010. You can read some of my early articles on the subject of textbook affordability written to generate more awareness of the issues to the academic library community here, here and here.

    In addition to writing about the challenge that expensive textbook presented to students, I helped to pioneer the use of incentive programs to encourage faculty to adopt OER and other alternative, zero-cost learning materials. These efforts, along with those of colleagues at other institutions, led many academic librarians to develop these types of Textbook Affordability Projects at their own institutions, which has led to vast savings on textbooks for college students.

    In 2017 I began teaching at the San Jose State University iSchool, a professional graduate program that prepares students for careers in librarianship. It occurred to me that students in library science education program (LIS) were overlooked by the open education community as a potential partner in advocating for OER. Anticipating that there would be interest among LIS students in learning more about open education, I proposed a four-week, one-credit course on Open Education Librarianship to the iSchool administration. The proposal was accepted and I taught the first section of the course in July 2020. To save space on how it developed, the structure of the course and the response to it by the first class, you can read more about this in the article "Taking OER to the LIS: Designing and Developing an Open Education Course for LIS Students", published in the International Journal of Open Education Resources.[There is PDF of the article attached to this page]

    While the course, as I teach it, is short, just four weeks, another instructor could make it longer if they wished. Six weeks is perhaps optimal. Eight weeks is perhaps too long, but not impossible.I keep in mind that students are paying for their courses by the credit hour. If I can do anything to help the students keep their educational expenses as low as possible, I will do it. One way I can do that is to give the solid foundation needed to succeed in open education while making it as concise as possible so it fulfills the minimum number of credits, four. Each of the four times I've taught, there are always a few evaluation comments requesting or suggesting that the course should be longer than four weeks.

    With the availability of the course materials, I encourage other LIS faculty to create a similar open education librarianship course at their institution. The response to the course is encouraging (close to full registration each time I teach it) because it reinforces that LIS students are eager to support good causes and they believe strongly in social justice as a core value of the library profession. Where it is taught, this course will help to prepare future leaders of the open education movement in librarianship and higher education.

    Please contact me if you have questions about the content provided here or would like to know more about the Open Education Librarianship course as I teach it. Finally, many thanks to all of my academic library and higher education colleagues who inspire me to advocate for open education and who so willingly share their knowledge and resources. Like this OERCommons site, it will contribute to our collective ability to advance open education and build a better culture of openness in higher education.

    Course Syllabus

    Before You Begin:

    You can edit this syllabus anyway you like to customize it to your own preferences. It is provided here to give a template for the course syllabus. Depending on the LIS program where the course is offered, the course policies will likely differ.

    Course Description:

    Global higher education is shifting to an environment of openness that supports faculty adoption of Open Education Resources (OER) for improved learning and open pedagogy methods to engage students more actively in the development of learning resources. In this course students will gain skills enabling them to lead OER initiatives, support educators seeking to develop open pedagogy-based courses, help educators and students (K-16) identify and evaluate open learning resources and engage with other academics to promote cultures of openness in primary, secondary and post-secondary education institutions. This course will help to prepare students for positions as scholarly communication and OER librarians.

    Global higher education is shifting to an environment of openness that supports faculty adoption of Open Education Resources (OER) for improved learning and open pedagogy methods to engage students more actively in the development of learning resources. According to David Wiley, a pioneer of open practices in education, open-enabled  education is:

    OER-enabled pedagogy is the set of teaching and learning practices only possible or practical when you have permission to engage in the 5R activities. (Wiley, 2017)

    In this course students will gain skills enabling them to lead OER initiatives, support educators seeking to develop open pedagogy-based courses, help educators and students (K-16) identify and evaluate open learning resources and engage with other academics to promote cultures of openness in primary, secondary and post-secondary education institutions. This course will help to prepare students for positions as scholarly communication and OER librarians.

    Reference: Wiley, David. "OER-Enabled Pedagogy",  Iterating Towards Openness May 2, 2017. Retrieved at https://opencontent.org/blog/archives/5009 (Links to an external site.)  

    Course Objectives:

    At the completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    1. Advocate for open education values and strategies within an academic institution or other educational community.
    2. Differentiate OER from other learning content
    3. Competently search for and identify OER across academic disciplines
    4. Clearly explain open pedagogical methods and identify examples of open pedagogy assignments and projects that support faculty efforts to engage students in their own learning through the creation of sustainable learning content that is reused and further developed by future students.
    5. Gain familiarity with OER policy and legislation for advocacy development.
    6. Identify trends in open and commercial publication of learning material.

    Course Policies:

    Attendance: Attendance in this course is totally based on your participation in online course activities. In an online course, missing class means you do not participate in the regular discussions or submit your assignments/homework on time. You must keep the instructor notified of any problems that will keep you from fulfilling the requirements on time. Notifications may be made by voicemail or email. 

    Grading Policy:Assignments will be graded on the quality of the work submitted and how effectively it meets the criteria of the provided rubric. Once a grade has been returned to the student, with appropriate feedback, the student may not resubmit the work unless there is clear evidence of instructor error or miscommunication about the assignment.

    Late Assignment Policy:  Another quality of critical importance in professional persons is punctuality of assignments. All assignments and homework are to be turned in on time. If you are going to turn in an assignment late, you MUST contact the instructor by phone or e-mail with an explanation that will be taken into consideration in the grading process. Valid reasons for lateness, such as emergencies, will result in no penalty for lateness. Whenever possible, please contact the instructor in advance about late submissions of work.

    All assignments are to be turned in electronically by 11:59PM  on the due date. After  the instructor grades the assignment, one (1) point will be deducted for any assignment that is in excess of 12 hours late. One additional point will be deducted for every additional day that the assignment is late. Therefore, an assignment received a week after its due date will have a total of 7 points deducted for lateness.

    NOTE: While you can set CANVAS to your own time zone (other than PST), the iSchool technology team recommends leaving it set to Pacific Standard Time.

    Example – Assignment due on July 14 at 11:59 pm, but received on July 15 after 12 noon –1 point deduction.
    Received July 16 – 2 point deduction
    Received July 17 – 3 point deduction
    Received July 21 (one week late) – 7 point deduction

    Extensions may be granted without penalty in cases of true emergencies. However, being unprepared or “busy” does not constitute an emergency.

    Language Policy: Please remember that although we are working in an online environment, we are still in an educational setting. You are to refrain from using inappropriate or offensive language during class discussions and in all course assignments. Violations of this policy will result in point deductions, relative to the nature of the offense. Discussion board and other assignments should be written in a professional manner, avoiding the use of “text-style” grammar and spelling.

    Inclusion Policy: Students are expected to participate fully in all class activities.  It is expected that students will be open-minded and participate fully in discussions in class and debate in a mature and respectful manner.  Use of derogatory, condescending, or offensive language including profanity is prohibited.  Disagreement is healthy and perfectly acceptable.   Expressing disagreement should always include an explanation of your reasoning and, whenever possible, evidence to support your position. In accordance with San José State University's Policies, the Student Code of Conduct, and applicable state and federal laws, discrimination based on gender, gender identity, gender expression, race, nationality, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, or disability is prohibited in any form.    

    Incomplete Grade Policy:  There are NO incomplete grades in this class. Students who have not completed all the requirements prior to the last day of class will need to talk with the instructor about how this will be rectified in the shortest time frame (e.g., before the beginning of the next semester).

    Course Requirements:

    Learning Activities & Assessment Procedures:

    1. Discussion Board (20 points possible): There will be 4 class discussions hosted on our discussion board.  Each Wednesday the instructor will initiate that week's discussion by posting a topic/question related to that week's material.  Each student is expected to post a thoughtful and reflective response on the topic, and optionally can include references from the course readings and/or other researched materials.  
      ***At the end of each discussion post, the student should include at least one question related to his/her post and designed to generate further discussion.  
      ***No later than 11:59 PM (your local time) on the following Sunday, each student should submit their original response to the discussion topic. No later than 11:59 pm (your local time) on the following Tuesday, each student should respond to at least one other student's posting. Students can only view and respond to other posts after they have submitted their original response to the instructor's prompt.
      Example:
      Wednesday, July 7 - Weekly discussion post is available

      Sunday, July 11 - By 11:59 (your time) submit your original post
      Tuesday, July 13 - By 11:59 (your time) submit your response to another post

      Responses should include thoughtful consideration of the question posed by the original poster.  A response of a few words or a single sentence (e.g. “I agree!”) is not acceptable.  Grading: 3 points possible for original post and 2 points for the response: 5 points possible per discussion.  Grading of the original post will be based on the quality of the content, the timeliness of the submission, and the inclusion of a follow-up question designed to further the discussion. Grading of the responses will be based on both quality and timeliness.

     2. Assignments: - 80 points possible – Students will complete four weekly assignments for this course. Assignments are designed to provide exposure to and experience with different elements of open education. Each assignment, with instruction details, is explained within the course modules. Modules will launch each week on Wednesdays. Unless otherwise specified the assignments are due the following Tuesday at 11:59 pm - your local time zone

    • Week 1 - Respond to an OER Myth - 20 points  (supports CLO #1)
    • Week 2 - Create an open pedagogy-focused video - 20 points (supports CLO #1-2)
    • Week 3 - Complete the OER treasure hunt - 20 points (supports CLOs #1, 3)
    • Week 4 - OER workshop video - 20 points (supports CLO #3)

    Required Texts and Resources:

    There are no required textbooks for this course. All learning materials will be provided for students and embedded in course modules.

    Statement of Student Rights

    Any student with a documented disability who may require special accommodations should self-identify to the instructor as early in the semester as possible to receive effective and timely accommodations. Together we will work with the Disability Resources and Services (Links to an external site.) office to identify appropriate accommodations. 

    Academic Honesty: 

    Your own commitment to learning, as evidenced by your enrollment at San José State University, and the University's Academic Integrity Policy (Links to an external site.) require you to be honest in all your academic coursework. Faculty members are required to report all infractions to the Office of Student Conduct and Ethical Development. 

    Course Calendar (subject to change in consultation with students)

    Dates

    Content

    Module 1

    Start Wednesday, June 29, 2022

    Assignments Due: Tuesday, July 5, 2022

     

    Topics: Introduction to the Open Education Agenda
                 What are Open Education Resources (OER).                                                             Textbook Crisis

    Read/View:

    1) Instructor's Video Lecture - watch this first

    2) Required reading/video:
    OER Starter Kit (Links to an external site.) (sections one and two)

    Walz, A. 2017. A Library Viewpoint: Exploring Open Educational Practices. In: Open: The Philosophy and Practices that are Revolutionizing Education (Links to an external site.)and Science . Pp. 147–162

    See Module One for Optional Reading/Video

    Required Assignments
    Response to an OER Myth

    This week's graded discussion: 1) introduce yourself 2) why this course 3) share a textbook experience

    Module 2
    Start Wednesday, July 6, 2022

    Assignment Due:
    Tuesday, July 12 2022

     


    Topics:  Open Pedagogy
                  Role of the Open Advocate

    Required Reading/Viewing:

    a. OER Starter Kit : Under "Teaching with OER" read the first two sections a) Open Pedagogy and b) Considerations for Using Open Pedagogy

    b. Momentum Building: Progress Towards a National OER Movement (Links to an external site.) (Allen, Bell and Billings)

    c. What is Open Pedagogy (Links to an external site.) (Wiley)

    Required Assignment:
    Create a 3-5 minute video that (1)instructs faculty how to covert an assignment to open pedagogy or (2) choose an existing open pedagogy assignment and in the video explain to faculty what makes it "open" and how this advantages learners.

    This week's graded discussion: Get to know an open education advocate

    Week 3
    July 13, 2022

    Assignment Due:
    Tuesday, July 19, 2022


     

    Topic: Leading an OER Initiative; Searching/Finding OER; OER Workshops; Creative Commons Licensing

    Required Reading/Viewing: 

    a. OER Starter Kit : Under section three "Finding OER" read the chapters "Finding Open Content", "Repositories and Search Tools" and "OER in Print"

    b. OER Starter Kit : Under section four section two "Copyright" read the chapters "Copyright and Open Licensing" and "Creative Commons Licenses"

    c. Jeremy Smith "Seeking Alternatives to High-Cost Textbooks: Six Years of the Open Education Initiative at the University of Massachusetts Amherst (Links to an external site.)" (in) OER: A Field Guide for Academic Librarians

    d. Central Washington University's OER and No-cost Textbook Initiative  (Links to an external site.)(video recording of a presentation at the Coalition for Networked Information Conference 2020; closed captioning is available)

    Required Assignments:
     Complete the OER Treasure Hunt 

    This week's graded discussion: The OER quality debate

    Week 4
    July 20, 2022

    Assignment Due:
    Tuesday, July 26, 2022


     

    Topic: Trends in OER and Open Pedagogy; OER Publishing; DEI in Open Education; Talking to Faculty About OER; OER Research

    Required Reading/Viewing: 

     a. OER Starter Kit: Under section four "Teaching with OER" read the chapter "Diversity and Inclusion"

    b. John Hilton, "What Does the Research Say About OER? (Links to an external site.)" (in) OER: A Field Guide for Academic Librarians

    c. BC Open Education, "Self-Publishing Guide (Links to an external site.)," browse (no need to read in detail) chapter one " Look Before You Write"

    Required Assignments:
    Prepare an OER workshop presentation for faculty

    This week's graded discussion: Read and summarize an OER research article

     

    Week One - Introductory Material

    Introduction to the Course:

    Welcome to INFO281-16, Open Education Librarianship.

    This is a 1-credit course that introduces students to basic principles and practices of open education. Why open education?

    Primarily in higher education, there is a revolution in the way in which learning content and scholarly research is published and disseminated. Although traditional publication models still tend to dominate the landscape for learning content, increasingly educators and researchers are taking back ownership of their intellectual property and licensing it in non-traditional ways that grant permission for other educators and researchers to use it without payment or penalty.

    Given their core value of providing barrier-free access to information, support for open education initiatives comes naturally to librarians. Creating cultures of openness in our communities connects with our educational mission. With textbooks in particular, as you will learn in this course or have experienced yourself, owing to their cost many students cannot afford them. College undergraduates may even need to choose between paying their tuition bill, rent or other necessities and the purchase of a textbook. Surveys of students and their textbook buying behavior reveals that as many as 70% of students have decided not to buy a textbook at least once because they could not afford that textbook.

    Working collaboratively with educators, librarians have advanced the benefits of open learning materials and open pedagogy to the advantage of our students. When students cannot afford their learning materials they are at a disadvantage and more likely to fail. Education and the ability to succeed should be equally accessible to all students, not just those who can afford to buy textbooks.

    In this course you will learn about the different ways in which librarians have been actively involved in the open education movement, the organizations that have evolved to support their efforts, how educators have recognized and responded to the textbook crisis, and the ways in which advocacy have resulted in legislative efforts at the state and federal levels to support textbook affordability strategies.

    As your instructor, my goal is to introduce you to the current landscape of open education in order to enable you to determine how and in what ways you will want to become engaged with the open education movement. It may be that open education is only peripherally of interest to you or you may be passionate about open education as a social justice issue, one that will become more central to your library practice. 

    Whatever way this course influences your thinking and ideas about open education and your career in librarianship, I look forward to learning with you.

    Introduction to Week One:

    Welcome to Module One of Open Education Librarianship. The focus of this module is to introduce you to the Open Education agenda. This week's material will introduce you to the following topics:

    • Learning materials crisis
    • Defining open education
    • What is an open education resource
    • What is open pedagogy
    • Creative Commons Licensing
    • The open publishing model (vs. the traditional model)

    These are among the most fundamental subjects for developing a firm understanding of open education. This week is an introduction to and overview of these subjects. You will learn more about them - and related topics - in future weeks.

    Week One Learning Outcomes:

    Here are the learning outcomes for this module:

    Become familiar with the course, its structure and expectations of students;
    Get to know fellow students;
    Gain initial exposure to open education.
    Recognize the core issues that served as a catalyst to  the open education movement;
    Obtain an overview of the areas of open education that this course will cover.

    Week One Activity Guide:

    This week's focus is an introductory exposure to some key concepts and practices in open education. The goal is to gain an understanding of what open education resources are and where they fit into the open education landscape. This week's key activities are:

    a) Start with the instructor's video lecture
    b) Read the required readings. If time allows, review the recommended reading and video
    c) Participate in the discussion board activity and assignment
    d) Complete the week's assignments 



     

    Week One Lecture Slides

    This section contains the lecture slides for week one of the course. There are seven slide decks in total for week one.

    Download each week one PowerPoint file and edit them as needed or use as is.

    Here is a summary of what is covered in each slide deck:

    Week One Welcome Message: General Welcome to the Course

    Week One Part One: Instructor Welcome to Week One and Personal Profile 

    Week One Part Two: What is Open Education and Open Educational Resources (OER)

    Week One Part Three: Textbook Cost Crisis

    Week One Part Four: Faculty and Textbooks

    Week One Part Five: Overview: Finding OER and Textbook Affordability Initiatives

    Week One Supplemental Video: Traditional versus OER Publishing Model

     

    Week One Video Lectures

    Each lecture video corresponds to one of the Week One slide decks. The course instructor delivers the lecture content via the related video segment. This is intended to provide those who wish to replicate the course content with greater detail on what the instructor shares for each slide deck.

    Week One Lecture Video One

    Week_One_Lecture_Video_One

    Week One Lecture Video Two

    Week_One_Lecture_Video_Two

    Week One Lecture Video Three

    Week_One_Lecture_VIdeo_Three

    Week One Lecture Video Four 

    Week_One_Lecture_Video_Four

    Week One Lecture Video Five

    Week_One_Video_Lecture_Five

    Week One Supplemental Lecture Video (Traditional versus OER Publishing Model)

    Week_One_Supplemental_Video_OER_Publishing_Model

     

    Week One Discussion Board Topic: Share Your Textbook Story

    The week one discussion board post serves a dual purpose. First, students introduce themselves to the class and can speak to their experience with OER and affordable learning, as well as their interest in taking the course. Second, everyone has a textbook story. Students get to know each other's most memorable experience with their own textbook purchasing. It serves as a bonding experience because no matter how different they are, every student has a similar story to share about a bad textbook experience in college.

    Welcome and Textbook Experience

    Greetings and welcome to our class discussion board. Our initial class discussion is mostly about you. 

    Remember to make your initial post to the discussion board by Sunday night at 11:59 pm. Then respond to at least one other student by the following Tuesday night at 11:59 pm. Please note that you won't lose points if your initial post is submitted after Sunday night. That is just a guideline for good discussion board practice so that there are ample posts for students to respond to by Tuesday night. The loss of points for a late submission only applies to initial or response posts that are submitted after the Tuesday night deadline. You earn 3 points for your initial post and 2 points for your response post. 

    Post a message to the discussion that responds to the following three points:

    1. A short statement about yourself. This will help the others in the course to get to know you a little. Please share some information about what you currently do in addition to attending the iSchool (work or something else), how far along you are in the program, any specific interest areas within librarianship, etc.
    2. Why did you enroll in this course? What attracted you to it? What are your expectations for learning about open education librarianship.
    3. Share an experience with textbook purchasing. It could be undergrad or grad. Share the course and information about the textbook if you recall it (name or subject of course, textbook title, cost). Where did you purchase the textbook? Was it new? Print or Digital? What did you think of the cost at the time? Did you actually use that textbook much? Did you keep it and if so have you referred back to it? How do your personal experiences with textbooks inform your perspectives on textbook affordability for students? What else do you want to share about textbook purchasing? If you can't recall a personal experience you can talk to a friend or relative and ask these questions - and then share their experience (but indicate if the experience being shared belongs to someone other than yourself).
    4. To complete your post, please add a question that you would like to ask other students.

    Week One Assignment and Rubric - Debunk an OER Myth

    Assignment Description:

    Open education librarians are often challenged to create awareness and interest in open education resources among educators owing to long-held myths about what OER is, how it is created and its availability. In this assignment you will take on the role of an OER librarian who is  confronted with an OER myth and seeks to provide a well-thought out response to that particular myth.

    For this assignment you will select one OER myth found in the publication OER Mythbusting. (Links to an external site.)

    1. Review the various myths.

    2. Choose one myth. For example, you could select "OER are not sustainable". Click on the link for each myth to read more about it and find additional resources related to that myth.

    3. Prepare a response to that myth. Put yourself into the position of an OER Librarian who has been questioned about or confronted with a myth. 

    4. Your response should provide an explanation that counters or refutes that particular myth. The response can take the form of a 250-400 word PDF or WORD document. Upload your assignment when it is completed.

    5. Cite at least one source in your response that provides information or documentation to help counter the myth. Your source could be a research article, a blog post or any other source of documentable information.

    6. For some, but not all of the myths you may find additional context from a similar OER Mythbusting (Links to an external site.) publication prepared by SPARC. Please just use this as an additional source. Be sure to choose your myth from publication cited above.

    Assignment Rubric:

    OER Mythbusting

    CriteriaRatingsPts

    This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeQuality of Response to the Myth

    10 to >7.0 pts

    Clearly Evident

    Response fully considers the implications of the myth on faculty adoption of OER and provides a well thought out and organized response. This response would convince a faculty member to change their mind and see that this is just a myth.

    7 to >4.0 pts

    Evident But Needs Development

    Response considers some aspects of the myth but there are some obvious arguments to counteract this myth that are missing. This would not necessarily be a strong enough argument to change a faculty member's mind.

    4 to >0 pts

    Not Evident

    The response fails to address the myth with any good or clear arguments that would convince a faculty member that this is in fact more myth than reality.

    10 pts

    This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeComprehensiveness of Response to Myth

    5 to >3.0 pts

    Clearly Evident

    Thorough job of breaking down the myth and providing counterarguments that clarify why this is a myth and what the research or qualified experts say to refute it. Student includes one or more citations from the open education literature to support their myth busting.

    3 to >1.0 pts

    Evident But Needs Development

    Good job of breaking down the myth. There is a counterargument but misses some information that could be used to make the case this is simply a myth. Student includes at least one citation from the open education literature to support their myth busting.

    1 to >0 pts

    Not Evident

    The attempt at refuting the myth is lacking the necessary information needed to make the case. Student fails to cite any open education to support their counterargument against the myth.

    5 pts

    This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeWriting Quality

    5 to >3.0 pts

    Clearly Evident

    The mythbusting response is well written, flows logically and is free of grammar and spelling errors. When any diagrams or images are used they are clear to understand and contribute to the quality of the response.

    3 to >1.0 pts

    Evident But Needs Development

    The writing is mostly well done and is clearly understood but the proofreading is less well done. There are words missing, misspelled words or obvious grammatical errors. Any diagrams or images used are good but fair to effectively contribute to supporting the response.

    1 to >0 pts

    Not Evident

    The students' report is poorly written and difficult for the instructor to read or understand owing to grammar and spelling errors. The report appears to have been hastily compiled with little evidence of proofreading. Any diagrams or images used are poor in quality and difficult to understand.

    5 pts

    Total Points: 20

    Week One Required and Recommended Reading/Video

    Required Reading:

    OER Starter Kit: read the first two modules: "Getting Started" and "Copyright"

         b. Walz, A. 2017. A Library Viewpoint: Exploring Open Educational Practices. In: Jhangiani, R S and
              Biswas-  Diener, R. (eds.) Open: The Philosophy and Practices that are Revolutionizing Education
              and Science. Pp. 147–162. London: Ubiquity Press. DOI: https://doi.org/10.5334/bbc.l. License: CC-BY 4.0

          c. Temple University  OwlCrowd  for TextbookAffordability  Project (captioned)Owl Crowd Video
              d. Robin DeRosa Talks About Open Education (captioned)Open Education

    Recommended Reading/Video:

         a. West, Q. 2017. Librarians in the Pursuit of Open Practices. In: Jhangiani, R S and
              Biswas-Diener, R. (eds.) Open: The Philosophy and Practices that are Revolutionizing Education and
              Science. Pp. 139–146. London: Ubiquity Press. DOI: https://doi.org/10.5334/bbc.k. License: CC-BY 4.0

         b.  Getting Started with OER - this archived webinar covers many of the course topics in a one-hour video

          c. Hofer, Amy. 2019.Four Years and Falling: Impact of Statewide Funding for Textbook Affordability. Open Oregon Educational Resources.  December 20, 2019. (This gives a more realistic picture of how textbook costs can be a challenge to track and present - but can show the impact of affordability strategies over time).

    Week One - Optional Quiz

    For each week in the course, students have the option to take a no-risk quiz to test their comprehension and recall of that week's course content. 

    In the attached document you will find all of the quiz questions with the correct answer identified, along with multiple incorrect responses. 

    For each response there is a feedback message, both for the correct and incorrect responses. 

    This document will facilitate the creation or modification of quiz content for the week one module.

     

    Week Two - Introductory Material

    Introduction to Week Two

    Now that you have a broad view and understanding of open education, starting this week you'll take a deeper dive into the core components of open education librarianship. This week we go into two of those areas, advocacy for openness and open pedagogy. In many areas of librarianship, being a subject matter and content expert is essential to the skill set of a successful librarian. In some ways though, that is a passive role. We wait until there is a question or research need for which our skills are valued and then we go into action. In the open education community, librarians see things a bit differently.

    In order to advance open education, affordable learning content and better learning for our students we must be advocates who pro-actively push the open agenda. Too many educators and legislators are fine with the textbook status quo and are rarely motivated to create change. That's why it is essential for open education librarians to take an active advocacy stance to create the change K-16 education needs so that our educators take back control of learning content and that students engage with their instructors in achieving that goal. 

    This week's module introduces you to open education advocacy and the information you will use to become an open advocate if you choose this professional role.  As open advocates, we can operate at two or three levels. First, advocating for openness at our own institution to create change locally. Second, advocating for open legislation at the national and state levels to create change regionally, nationally and globally. It is a long, arduous process, but creating change to a broken system is never easy.

    This week's other topic, open pedagogy, is rapidly gaining the interest of a new generation of educators who want their students to go beyond the traditional assignments that leave students underwhelmed and offer low activation. Too often students write a course research paper, receive their grade and then promptly forget about that assignment and what was accomplished - think of it as a disposable assignment. Open pedagogy is about actively engaging students in their learning by inviting them to be contributors to what happens in the course and their assignments, not mere recipients of information. Above all, open pedagogy is based on using and creating open educational resources - and the value of OER is fulfilled when it is adopted for the purpose of open pedagogy.

    Week Two Learning Outcomes

    Here are the learning outcomes for this module;

    Become an advocate/leader for open education
    Know the organizations that support open advocacy
    Find information about open advocacy
    Identify federal and state textbook affordability legislation
    Internalize open pedagogy as an open education strategy
    Explain and create pedagogy assignments
    Locate open pedagogy resources

    Week Two Activity Guide

    This week's focus is two aspects of open education: advocacy for open education and open pedagogy. The goal is to gain exposure to the the role of the open advocate and advocating at the institutional, state and federal levels and to gain basic knowledge of open pedagogy methods and how they contribute to the growth of openness and student learning.

    This week's key activities are:
    a) Start with the instructor's video lecture
    b) Read the required readings. If time allows, review the recommended reading and/or video
    c) Participate in the discussion board activity and assignment
    d) Complete this week's assignment.   

    Week Two Lecture Slides

    This section contains the lecture slides for week two of the course. There are two slides decks in total for week two of the course.

    Download each week two PowerPoint file and edit them as needed or use as is.

    Here is a summary of what is covered in each slide deck:

    Week Two Part One: Open Education Advocacy 

    Week Two Part Two: What is Open Pedagogy

    Week Two Lecture Videos

    Each lecture video corresponds to one of the Week Two slide decks. The course instructor delivers the lecture content via the related video segment. This is intended to provide those who wish to replicate the course content with greater detail on what the instructor shares for each slide deck.

    Week Two Lecture Video One

    Week Two Lecture Video One

     

    Week Two Lecture Video Two

    Week Two Lecture Video Two

     

    Week Two Discussion Board Topic: Get to Know an OER Advocate

    Get to Know an OER Advocate

    For this week's discussion you'll have a brief activity followed by sharing some information with your classmates. Below I am providing the names of a group of (mostly) well known advocates for open education. They may be champions for open educational resources, open pedagogy or both. 

    Next to each advocate listed there are students' last names. Whoever your name is next to - that's the advocate you've been assigned.  Then do some research to learn more about this person. In your discussion post:

    (a) Identify your advocate's name and briefly report a few facts (where they work, their position, anything else you deem relevant).

    (b) Report on the nature of this advocate's role. What do they appear to be best known for, what issue do they often discuss or in what particular area of open education do they demonstrate expertise.  Provide an example or two of some of their advocacy work or a project of interest. Budget 15-30 minutes for your research. 

    (c) What is one question you'd like to ask this advocate?

    You should be able to find information about all of these individuals with standard internet searches, but feel free to use the research databases provided through the King Library. As advocates these individuals are sharing their views on social media - so check those sources as well. You may find their conference talks or slide decks. 

    No need to come up with a question for other students for this discussion. Just respond to any other student's post. If your advocate was covered by another student, you might want to comment on that post, comparing insights about your advocate.

    Here's the list:

    Nicole Allen [assign student(s)
    Maha Bali
    Josh Bolick 
    David (Dave) Ernst 
    Amanda Coolidge 
    Regina Gong 
    Cable Green 
    Lindsey Gumb 
    John Hilton 
    Amy Hofer 
    Rajiv Jhangiani 
    Robin DeRosa
    Jasmine Roberts 
    Amanda Larson 
    David Wiley
    Daniel Williamson 
    Tanya Spilovoy

    Week Two Assignment and Rubric: Create an Open Pedagogy Video

    Assignment Description

    Multimedia is a powerful tool that open education advocates can use to get their message out to educators to help them learn more about topics like open pedagogy: what is it; what does it mean for students; how does it work. For example, this instructor describing their open pedagogy assignment so others can understand what it involves. In this week's assignment you will play the role of an open pedagogy enthusiast and create your own video. 

    You can take either one of the following approaches:

    1) Prepare a video presentation where the target audience is a faculty member or K-12 educator in which you are explaining how they could take their traditional disposable assignment and convert it to a renewable open pedagogy assignment. There are examples out there that can inspire your thinking and they could serve as an example.

    2) Prepare a video presentation where the target audience is a faculty member, other educator or librarians. In this video your goal is to take an existing open pedagogy assignment - find examples and select one that resonates with you - and then explain in your video what makes this assignment a good example of open pedagogy in practice. Why is it "open"? How does it benefit learners? What makes it different from a traditional assignment?

    For recording the video I recommend using the Studio tool that is already embedded in Canvas. Studio integrates with the Canvas gradebook, allowing the instructor to add comments directly to your video. You will find it in the navigation menu where you also find links to the Calendar, Inbox and Dashboard. Here is a short video created by an iSchool student with basic instructions for creating a video in Canvas with a webcam. You can just record yourself giving a talk or create a set of slides that you can then record with a voice over (similar to my course video lectures).

    Canvas also provides a help sheet for students on submitting media created on Canvas Studio.

    If you are having difficulty using Studio to record and submit your assignment, then you can contact me to provide notification of the issue you are having with Studio. Then you can identify the video recording tool that you plan to use to record the assignment. Whatever other video software you use, the multimedia file must be saved in the MPEG-4 format.

    NOTE: I recognize every student's access to technology may differ. If you need to prepare your video in a way that your technology supports I can be flexible. Just drop me a note to let me know if you will be submitting in a manner different from what I've described here, allowing for some advance notice.

    Your video should be approximately 3 - 5 minutes  - but no more than 5 minutes. [NOTE: Canvas Studio WILL NOT allow a recording longer than 5 minutes...just a cautionary reminder]

    When you complete your video you can submit it via Canvas Studio server, which is designed to facilitate the submission of assignments (see the help sheet). When you click on "Submit Assignment" one of the tab options will be for "Studio" - click that to find the video you want to upload and submit for your assignment.

    Do consider making a few short test videos with Studio to make sure you are comfortable with the process before recording your final video for submission.

    I look forward to viewing your videos.

    Assignment Rubric

    Title: 

    Open Education Advocacy Video

    CriteriaRatingsPts

    Edit criterion description Delete criterion row

    This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeQuality of Topic Coverage

    Range 

    Edit rating

    7 to >5.0 pts

    Clearly Evident

    The video demonstrates that the student has invested time in understanding open pedagogy and preparing to help others learn about it. Anyone watching this video will be able to grasp the meaning of the topic, what it is about and why it matters.

    Edit rating Delete rating

    5 to >2.0 pts

    Evident But Needs Development

    The video demonstrates that the student has taken time to get to know the topic and educate others about it but some essential points are missing from the case being made. Anyone watching this video may be able to grasp the meaning of the topic, but may be less clear about what it is and why it matters.

    Edit rating

    2 to >0 pts

    Not Evident

    The video fails to demonstrate that the student invested time to understand open pedagogy and reflects little time spent preparing to educate others about it. Anyone watching this video would be confused or uninformed about the meaning and importance of the topic and why it matters.

     pts

    Edit criterion description Delete criterion row

    This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeCreates a Compelling Message

    Range 

    Edit rating

    7 to >5.0 pts

    Clearly Evident

    The video shows enthusiasm for the topic by offering a compelling message in educating others about this topic. Anyone watching this video would be interested in learning more about open pedagogy and wanting to become more engaged with it.

    Edit rating Delete rating

    5 to >2.0 pts

    Evident But Needs Development

    The video shows an interest in the topic with a clear message about the topic but is less enthusiastic in educating others about the topic. Anyone watching this video would find it of interest and would understand the speaker's position but may be less willing to get engaged with open pedagogy.

    Edit rating

    2 to >0 pts

    Not Evident

    The video fails to generate any enthusiasm for the topic because the message is hardly compelling in making a case for this topic. Anyone watching this video would care little about the topic and would likely not pay further attention to it.

     pts

    Edit criterion description Delete criterion row

    This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeDisplays Comprehension of Open Pedagogy

    Range 

    Edit rating

    3 to >2.0 pts

    Clearly Evident

    Student's video demonstrates that they understand the impact of open pedagogy in open education and what needs to be accomplished in making the case for it to the video viewing audience.

    Edit rating Delete rating

    2 to >1.0 pts

    Evident But Needs Development

    Student's video shows some understanding of the role of open pedagogy but there is less clarity on how to make the case for it to the video viewing audience.

    Edit rating

    1 to >0 pts

    Not Evident

    Student's video does not demonstrate an understanding of open pedagogy and fails to make the case for it to the video viewing audience.

     pts

    Edit criterion description Delete criterion row

    This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeQuality of Communication

    Range 

    Edit rating

    3 to >2.0 pts

    Clearly Evident

    Student makes good use of the video format to create a compelling message that clearly communicates the topic. As a bonus, the video incorporates some creativity to enhance its effectiveness as a vehicle for advocating for this topic.

    Edit rating Delete rating

    2 to >1.0 pts

    Evident But Needs Development

    Student's video sufficiently communicates the topic so that it makes for an effective message about the topic. This is a watchable video that serves as a good vehicle for advocating to the topic.

    Edit rating

    1 to >0 pts

    Not Evident

    Student's video is not well made so that it detracts from the ability to effectively communicate the message about the topic. This video would not make a convincing or compelling case for the topic.

     pts

    Total Points: 20

     

    Week Two Required and Recommended Reading/Video

    Required Reading/Video

    a.  OER Starter Kit ( : Under "Teaching with OER" read the first two sections a) Open Pedagogy and b) Considerations for Using Open Pedagogy

    b. Momentum Building: Progress Towards a National OER Movement (Allen, Bell and Billings)

    c. What is Open Pedagogy (Wiley)

    Optional Reading/Video

    a. Visit the Open Pedagogy Notebook and do some exploration of the content and assignments

    b. SPARC OER State Policy Tracker: examine OER legislation in your state

    c.  Bell, Steven J; Salem, Joseph A. It’s Up to the Librarians: Establishing A Statewide OER InitiativePennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice, v. 5, n. 2, p. 77-82, oct. 2017. doi:https://doi.org/10.5195/palrap.2017.166.; 

    d. "Open Pedagogy in Practice: Faculty Perspectives" (webinar) Listen to New England college and university open education leaders Dr. Robin DeRosa from New Hampshire, Dr. Jennifer Van Allen from New York, and Dr. Heather Miceli from Rhode Island share what Open pedagogy looks like in their classrooms, lessons learned they’ve learned along the way, and why their praxis is ever-changing.

    e. Watch Trudi Radtke's (SPARC) web presentation History of College Textbook Prices: Examining Past Practices and Emerging Models. (recorded May 24, 2022) for a good example of an advocate making the case against inclusive access deals.

    Week Two - Optional Quiz

    For each week in the course, students have the option to take a no-risk quiz to test their comprehension and recall of that week's course content. 

    In the attached document you will find all of the quiz questions with the correct answer identified, along with multiple incorrect responses. 

    For each response there is a feedback message, both for the correct and incorrect responses. 

    This document will facilitate the creation or modification of quiz content for the week two module.

    Week Three - Introductory Material

    Introduction

    The work of an Open Education Librarian requires knowledge of a variety of connected "open" subject areas and skills. For example, understanding copyright, having the ability to explain how an open education resource differs from any freely available learning object and being a competent instructor who can create and lead open education workshops. In this module you will focus on gaining some of those skills critical to open education librarianship.

    To advance the adoption of open education resources at their institutions, Open Education Librarians will develop what has become a fairly familiar program to engage and incentivize faculty to explore the possibility of doing away with traditional commercial textbooks. These programs are referred to as OER initiatives, textbook affordability projects, mini-grant projects or alt-textbook projects. The goal is to offer small monetary awards to faculty to support their transition from commercial textbooks to zero-cost course content. In this week's module you'll learn more about these programs and how they function.

    In order for a textbook affordability project to succeed, Open Education Librarians must use their expertise in finding the appropriate open education resources  to enable faculty to replace traditional textbooks with open and zero-cost content. One of the reasons many faculty do not adopt open education course content is their inability to find good content that convinces them that open resources are as effective as their traditional textbook. Admittedly, the right open education resources can sometimes be challenging to locate but with their knowledge of the right finding tools, Open Education Librarians can make the difference.

    It also helps to have a good understanding of copyright, fair use and how a Creative Commons License works. One of the key factors in determining if published learning content can be used openly is properly interpreting the way in which the material is licensed. Some may be re-used only with specific consent. In some cases, the creator is giving that permission through the license and in other cases it may require a fair use determination. Open Education Librarians may have the skills to make those determinations or they know who to ask. Having a basic understanding of the difference between traditional copyright and Creative Commons Licenses is a good start.

    This week's module will introduce you to these topics and provide you with some basic skills upon which you can build if you find yourself doing open education librarianship as part of your professional practice. 

    Learning Outcomes

    Here are the learning outcomes for this module;

    Know how OER initiatives (textbook affordability projects) work
    Lead OER initiatives from the library
    Identify sources of OER
    Develop skills for finding OER
    Explain the difference between free and OER
    Deliver an OER workshop
    Explore how Creative Commons Licensing Works

    Week Three Activity Guide

    This week's focus is on what Open Education Librarians need to know to effectively lead an OER and textbook affordability initiative at their institution. This includes understanding what these initiatives are and how they operate, how to organize them, who participates and how to sustain them. Critical to the success of these initiatives is the ability to find OER and other no-cost learning content that faculty can use to replace traditional textbooks. One challenge is that faculty often conflate free and OER. That is why Open Education Librarians develop OER workshops, to help educators better understand OER and how to identify appropriate OER for their course - or other zero-cost content. It helps to understand the role that Creative Commons Licensing plays in the development of OER.

    a) Start with the instructor's video lecture
    b) Go over the required readings and/or video. If time allows, review the recommended reading and/or video
    c) Participate in the discussion board activity and assignment
    d) Complete this week's assignment
    e) Take the no-risk quiz

    Week Three Lecture Slides

    This section contains the lecture slides for week three of the course. There are two slides decks in total for week two of the course.

    Download each week three PowerPoint file and edit them as needed or use as is.

    Here is a summary of what is covered in each slide deck:

    Week Three Part One: Library-Based OER Initiative Programs

    Week Three Part Two: Locating OER; Conducting Searches for OER

    Week Three Part Three: OER Workshops; Creative Commons Licensing

    Week Three Lecture Videos

    Each lecture video corresponds to one of the Week Three slide decks. The course instructor delivers the lecture content via the related video segment. This is intended to provide those who wish to replicate the course content with greater detail on what the instructor shares for each slide deck.

    Week Three Lecture Video One

    Week_Three_Lecture_Video_One


    Week Three Lecture Video Two

    Week_Three_Lecture_Video_Two


    Week Three Lecture Video Three

    Week_Three_Lecture_Video_Three

     

    Week Three Discussion Board Topic: The Quality Debate - What Makes a Textbook High Quality?

    The Quality Debate - What Makes a Textbook High Quality?

    "If something is free it can't be very good quality, can it?"

    That is a response nearly every OER advocate has heard from a faculty member during a conversation or workshop about adopting affordable learning materials. That can be a challenging question for a librarian to answer. 

    Why?

    Part of the challenge is that faculty are the experts when it comes to their disciplinary subject matter. As a librarian, I can't simply argue that the openly accessible OpenStax general chemistry book is better than the comparable Pearson general chemistry textbook that sells for nearly $300 (and may require an additional fee for access codes that lead to quizzes, homework assignments, etc). It's the faculty member who ultimately decides what textbook they think has the highest quality and is best suited to meet their teaching approach and the needs of their students. How would you answer the question?

    In my own experience, several faculty members in the chemistry department adopted the OpenStax book while others continued to require students to buy the Pearson book. Why did some faculty members accept the quality of the OpenStax book while others rejected it? Was it simply a choice by some faculty to refuse to force students to spend so much on a textbook? Did they believe that quality is less important than the impact on learning when every student has access to the learning materials - not just those who can afford it?

    I've had faculty tell me that all textbooks are the same in quality and that any one will do for supplementing their own course material (e.g., lectures, tests, etc.). Yet other faculty will use only one textbook - or only textbooks from the same publisher - which they think is the best quality. To make it even stranger, I've hear these opposing viewpoints from faculty who teach the same course.

    For this week's discussion you will:

    a) Read David Wiley's blog post "On Quality and OER".  

    b) Examine an OpenStax textbook - your choice. Consider how the quality of the OpenStax book compares to the traditional commerical textbooks you've purchased in the past (perhaps you have one on your bookshelf for comparison).

    c) In your post, identify by title the open textbook you selected for this discussion. Comment on your quick examination of this open textbook. Did it look "high quality" to you.

    c) In your post discuss how you would respond to a faculty member who said "If something is free it can't be very good quality, can it?" in response to your suggestion that an OpenStax textbook could be a good replacement for their existing traditional textbook while saving students money. What points would you try to make?  How do you think an OER advocate can best respond to the "quality" issue when it comes to course learning materials?

    d)  To complete your post, please add a question that you would like to ask other students.

    Week Three Assignment and Rubric: OER Treasure Hunt

    Assignment Description

    This week you learned about searching for and finding open educational resources. While there are two useful meta-search engines, OER can otherwise be scattered among different sites. That makes it a challenge to identify the right OER for a specific course. One way Open Education Librarians can support faculty adoption of OER is to use their research skills to locate appropriate OER for any particular course. 

    This OER Treasure Hunt assignment is designed to give you authentic practice searching for and discovering OER. I am providing a Treasure Hunt exercise sheet (See attached WORD doc) you'll use to complete the assignment. When you've completed it you can save it as a PDF file for upload.  The gist of this assignment is to select a college-level course for which you'll identify a commercial textbook. The exercise sheet has some suggestions. Then use various OER finding tools to find OER that would be appropriate for this course. Even if you don't find OER for your course, you'll report what efforts you made in searching for it. 

    The Treasure Hunt sheet has most of the instructions and guidance you'll need. Please complete all six sections of the exercise sheet. If the course you select has more than two textbooks required, just keep it to the two that seem most essential to the course.

    Assignment Rubric

    OER Treasure Hunt

     

    CriteriaRatingsPts

    This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeCompleteness of Assignment

    10 to >8.0 pts

    Clearly Evident

    Student completely responds to all six sections of the worksheet, providing the required information in each section. The completed worksheet demonstrates the student invested time and effort to complete the assignment.

    8 to >6.0 pts

    Evident But Needs Development

    Student mostly completes all six sections of the worksheet but some information is missing from one or more sections so that the assignment is not entirely complete. The worksheet reflects good effort but show some signs of lack of preparation and time invested.

    6 to >0 pts

    Not Evident

    Student submits assignment with one or more sections not completed at all. The submitted assignment reflects that there was little preparation and that the assignment was hastily completed with little attention to thoroughness.

    10 pts

    This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeQuality of Response

    5 to >4.0 pts

    Clearly Evident

    Student's worksheet demonstrates a high level of quality that is reflected in the resources used to complete the assignment. It indicates that the student applied the information from the week 3 lecture in completing the assignment or even exceeded that to identify resources for finding OER beyond what the instructor covered.

    4 to >2.0 pts

    Evident But Needs Development

    Student's worksheet demonstrate a good level of quality as reflected in the resources used to complete the assignment. It indicates that the student adequately used information from the week 3 lecture but misses or overlooks some of key resources for finding OER.

    2 to >0 pts

    Not Evident

    Student's worksheet demonstrates poor quality that is reflected in the resources used to complete the assignment. It indicates that the student used few if any of the resources shared in the week 3 lecture or otherwise appears the assignment was completed hastily with little thought or attention to the details.

    5 pts

    This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeClarity of Information Provided

    5 to >4.0 pts

    Clearly Evident

    Student's worksheet is well though out, explained and written in a manner that enables the instructor to clearly understand the information provided, choices made by the student and with thoughtful reflections in Part 6 of the worksheet.

    4 to >2.0 pts

    Evident But Needs Development

    Student's worksheet reflects good thought, with clear writing but is less consistent so that the instructor is sometimes unable to understand the information provided or the choices made by the student. The reflections in Part 6 of the worksheet are good but not consistently clearly explained.

    2 to >0 pts

    Not Evident

    Student's worksheet is confusing and lacks clarity of thought or is poorly explained such that the instructor is not able to understand the information provided. It is not well written. The reflections in Part 6 of the worksheet are superficial and demonstrate little thought going into the responses.

    5 pts

    Total Points: 20

    Week Three Required and Recommended Reading/Video

    Required Reading/Video

    a. OER Starter Kit: Under section three "Finding OER" read the chapters "Finding Open Content", "Repositories and Search Tools" and "OER in Print"

    b. OER Starter Kit: Under section four section two "Copyright" read the chapters "Copyright and Open Licensing" and "Creative Commons Licenses"

    c. Jeremy Smith "Seeking Alternatives to High-Cost Textbooks: Six Years of the Open Education Initiative at the University of Massachusetts Amherst" (in) OER: A Field Guide for Academic Librarians

    d. The OER Starter Kit for Program Managers . This is a guide to establishing an institutional OER initiative or program, as the authors refer to it. Browse chapters 2 (Building Your Team) and 3 (Program Management)

    Optional Reading/Video

    Central Washington University's OER and No-cost Textbook Initiative (video recording of a presentation at the Coalition for Networked Information Conference 2020; closed captioning is available)

    Steven Bell " Coming in the Back Door: Leveraging Open Textbooks To Promote Scholarly Communications on Campus"   Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication , 1(1), p.eP1040. DOI:  http://doi.org/10.7710/2162-3309.1040

    Steven Bell "What About the Bookstore?: Textbook Affordability Programs and the Academic Library-Bookstore Relationship" College & Research Library News DOI:  https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.78.7.375

    Schleicher,  Barnes,  and Joslin, 2020. OER Initiatives at Liberal Arts Colleges: Building Support at Three Small, Private Institutions. Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication , 8(1), p.eP2301. DOI:  http://doi.org/10.7710/2162-3309.2301

    Open Education Resources: College Library Information on Policy and Practice - refer to this (also on course OER resource list) for examples of textbook affordability initiatives at U.S. colleges.

    Week Three - Optional Quiz

    For each week in the course, students have the option to take a no-risk quiz to test their comprehension and recall of that week's course content. 

    In the attached document you will find all of the quiz questions with the correct answer identified, along with multiple incorrect responses. 

    For each response there is a feedback message, both for the correct and incorrect responses. 

    This document will facilitate the creation or modification of quiz content for the week two module.

    Week Four - Introductory Material

    Introduction

    Thus far you've learned a great deal about open education, from sources of OER and how to find it, to leading an OER initiative in an academic institution, knowing what makes open pedagogy unique and what a Creative Commons License is. In this final week I will wrap up your exploration of open education with a few miscellaneous topics - but which are no less important than what's been covered thus far. 

    This week we'll cover several unrelated topics that offer a look at some of the contemporary issues in open education.  One of the top challenges in open education is keeping up with the commercial textbook publishers as they try to present themselves as having the solution to high textbook costs...a problem they created. OER advocates need to pay attention to what the big textbook publishers are up to. Recent open conferences have given more time and attention to the importance of diversity, equity and inclusion in open education. Open education is a force for equity in higher education but like many fields it is not always given to diversity and inclusion. Realizing that they can't wait for someone else to fund and create new open textbooks, open advocates are developing publishing capacity and that is a critical growth area necessary to the future of open education.  This week you will also learn about the importance of research in open education, which brings crucial evidence in support of the quality and learning efficacy of open education resources.

    No doubt there are topics left uncovered. If you want to learn more about open education and discover the latest developments, there are many ways to continue learning about this topic. From participating in a learning community to following the LibOER listserv, not to mention reading the related literature and latest studies, you can successfully keep up with open education beyond this course.

    Learning Outcomes

    Here are the learning outcomes for this module:

    Recognize resources for keeping up with the open education conversation
    Demonstrate knowledge of open education publishing (how, where and why it is happening)
    Establish the skills to engage in conversation with faculty about open education
    Explain why diversity, equity and inclusion are important to the advance of open education
    Locate and review research on open education

    Activity Guide

    Module 4 introduces a set of miscellaneous issues and skills that are valuable to the work of open education librarians. In bringing the course to closure these seem like the most important topics to cover that didn't fit into any other week of the course. They also bring the course to a close by looking ahead to what will be happening for the open education movement. This week's activities (or some of them) are provided with an eye on helping you to keep learning about open education - as well as practicing it.  Below are the by now familiar activities the instructor has prepared for you. 

    a) Start with the instructor's video lecture
    b) Go over the required readings and/or video. If time allows, review the recommended reading and/or video
    c) Participate in the discussion board activity and assignment
    d) Complete this week's assignment
    e) Take the no-risk quiz

    Week Four Lecture Slides

    This section contains the lecture slides for week three of the course. There are two slides decks in total for week two of the course.

    Download each week three PowerPoint file and edit them as needed or use as is.

    Here is a summary of what is covered in each slide deck:

    Week Four Part One: Textbook affordability narrative; inclusive access; open vs. affordable; professional development and leadership; OER publishing

    Week Four Part Two: Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in open education; talking to faculty about OER

    Week Four Part Three: OER research; keeping up with open education; future open advocacy

    In addition, for Week Four, there is a supplemental resource for students. As this week's material covers talking to faculty about OER, there is a factsheet that provides sample "tough questions" faculty are known to ask about OER and recommended responses that students can use or practice with.

    Week Four Lecture Videos

    Each lecture video corresponds to one of the Week Four slide decks. The course instructor delivers the lecture content via the related video segment. This is intended to provide those who wish to replicate the course content with greater detail on what the instructor shares for each slide deck.

    Week Four Lecture Video One

    Week Four Lecture Video One

    Week Four Lecture Video Two

    Week Four Lecture VIdeo Two

    Week Four Lecture Video Three

    Week Four Lecture Video Three

     

    Week Four Discussion Board Topic: Explore the Open Education Research

    Explore the Open Education Research

    One of our topics this week is the research into the value and benefits of open education. Most of the research seeks to determine the impact of introducing open education resources into the classroom - and to what extent that impacts learning? What changes in learning, such as student performance and engagement, might instructors anticipate if they make the switch to OER? Does the research confirm or refute challenges to the quality of OER? Do course markings in student registration systems actually have an impact on student choice and academic success?

    To participate in this discussion you will select one open education research article - such as this example. This is a work of scholarship that uses a particular research methodology to conduct an experiment into the use of open education resources or teaching approaches. You can choose any open education research article of your choice. While you can certainly search for open education research using a resource such as Google Scholar or a King Library database for education research, you may want to start at the Open Education Group website. There is a good list of open education research compiled at this site. Consider choosing an article within the last few years so that the findings are less likely to be outdated.

    Post to the discussion list after you read your selected article. Cover the following points in your post:

    1 - Provide the article citation

    2 - Share a summary of key research findings of the article.

    3 - What is your big takeaway from this article that you want your classmates to know.

    4 - How might you use the findings of this article as an open education advocate? Could it be used to refute an OER myth? Could it be used to convince an educator to explore open pedagogy? 

    5 - To complete your post, please add a question that you would like to ask other students.

    Week Four Assignment and Rubric: Contribute to an Open Education Workshop Presentation

    Assignment Description

    This week you will have an opportunity to develop some content for an open education workshop presentation to instructors at your institution. As one of the academic librarians who is well versed in open education you've been asked to oversee the delivery of an open education workshop on your campus as part of your Open Education Week activities.

    To complete this assignment you will:

    1 - Create a short slide presentation, with a voice overlay, using the Canvas Studio tool for media projects. Please be sure to use Canvas Studio to create or submit your multimedia presentation. If you are having any difficulties with Studio, please contact the instructor to discuss the possibility of an alternate means of submitting the presentation.

    2 - First, create a set of slides on the topic of your presentation. You DO NOT need to provide an entire workshop on open education. You DO NEED to select just one area of open education and create a narrated slide presentation that would serve as just one section of a broader presentation on open education. Possible topics include:

    • Searching and Finding OER
      * Introduce the Open Textbook Library and point out  unique features and reasons for using it to discover OER
      *  The difference between free learning material and an open education resource (with examples)
      *  How to Create a Creative Commons License for an open education resource

    NOTE: whatever topic you choose begin your video with a statement that places your topic into the context of a full OER workshops. For example, you can say something like "Now that the workshop has introduced what an OER is and why they help our students, now we will focus on resources for discovering OER." This will allow you to demonstrate how your segment would fit into a full OER workshop.

    3 - Your narrated presentation should be no longer than 5 minutes [NOTE: Canvas Studio limits them to 5 minutes] so plan accordingly when you build your slide deck. Include a title slide with your name and the title of your presentation. While the majority of the grade for this assignment is based on the quality, accuracy and clarity of the information provided, some points are based on the quality of your slide presentation. There is no need to get fancy. You can stick to the basics. Slides should be easy to comprehend and follow and the presentation should be clearly articulated. 

    4 - Once your narrated slide presentation is complete you can submit it via Canvas Studio server, which is designed to facilitate the submission of assignments (see the help sheet). You already did this for the week two assignment so the submission process is the same.

    Note: Using Canvas Studio for a narrated slide presentation is similar to recording a video presentation. Have your slide deck ready to present and then open up the Studio. Click the "record" button and then choose "screen capture". You may be prompted to download the screen capture application. Once you are ready to record place the "recording window" over your slide deck (in presentation mode) and then press the button to begin recording your narration.  Try a few short practice recordings before starting the version you will submit.

    Assignment Rubric

     
    CriteriaRatingsPts
     Quality of Topic Coverage
     
     
     
    5 to >3.0 pts
    Clearly Evident
    The presentation demonstrates that the student has invested time in understanding the subject matter and preparing to explain it to others. Anyone watching this workshop presentation will be able to grasp the meaning of the topic, what it is about and why it matters. Student demonstrates mastery of the subject matter.
     
    3 to >2.0 pts
    Evident But Needs Development
    The presentation demonstrates that the student has taken time to get to know the topic and covers it adequately but some essential points are missing from the coverage of the subject matter. Anyone watching this workshop presentation may be able to grasp the meaning of the topic, but may be less clear about what it is and why it matters. Student demonstrates they grasp the subject matter.
     
    2 to >0 pts
    Not Evident
    The presentation fails to demonstrate that the student invested time to understand the subject matter and reflects little time spent preparing to make a presentation about it it. Anyone watching this workshop presentation would be confused or uninformed about the meaning and importance of the subject matter. Student is able to demonstrate only a weak grasp of the subject matter.
    5 pts
     Creates an Effective Message
     
     
     
    5 to >4.0 pts
    Clearly Evident
    The workshop presentation shows enthusiasm for the topic by offering a compelling message in about the subject matter. Student stays on topic for the entire video and does not introduce irrelevant or unrelated aspects of open education. Anyone watching this presentation would be interested in learning more about the subject matter and would want to become more engaged with it.
     
    4 to >2.0 pts
    Evident But Needs Development
    The workshop presentation shows an interest in the topic with a clear message about the subject matter but is less compelling in presenting it an audience. Student mostly stays on topic for the entire video and does not introduce irrelevant or unrelated aspects of open educationAnyone watching this presentation would find it of interest and would understand the presenter but may be less motivated to learn more about it.
     
    2 to >0 pts
    Not Evident
    The workshop presentation fails to generate any enthusiasm for the topic because the message is hardly compelling in discussing this topic. Student fails to stay on topic for the entire video and instead introduces irrelevant or unrelated aspects of open education. Anyone watching this presentation would care little about the topic and would likely not pay further attention to it.
    5 pts
    Meets Assignment Guidelines
     
     
     
    5 to >3.0 pts
    Clearly Evident
    The slide presentation demonstrates the student followed the assignment instructions carefully. It reflects thoughtful preparation for the assignment and the final product reflects the student paid careful attention to the instructor's directions for completing the assignment. For example, student correctly provides context for where the segment occurs in a full OER workshop
     
    3 to >2.0 pts
    Evident But Needs Development
    The slide presentation demonstrates the student mostly followed the assignment instructions but there are some minor oversights or omissions. It reflects good preparation for the assignment and the final product reflects the student's good level of attention to the instructor's directions for completing the assignment. For example, student correctly provides a good, if not thorough, context for where the segment occurs in a full OER workshop
     
    2 to >0 pts
    Not Evident
    The slide presentation demonstrates the student failed to follow the assignment instructions. It reflects poor preparation for the assignment and the final product reflects that little or no attention was paid to the instructor's directions for completing the assignment. For example, student fails to provide any context for where the segment occurs in a full OER workshop, as is requested in the assignment instructions.
    5 pts
    T Quality of Communication
     
     
     
    5 to >3.0 pts
    Clearly Evident
    Student makes good use of the slide presentation format to create a compelling message that clearly communicates the topic. Both the slide content and voiceover is clear and easily understood. As a bonus, the presentation incorporates some creativity to enhances its effectiveness as a vehicle for getting the audience enthusiastic about the subject matter.
     
    3 to >2.0 pts
    Evident But Needs Development
    Student makes good use of the slide presentation format to create an effective message that communicates the topic but clarity of the message could be stronger. Both the content and voiceover are competent and clear but it is less consistent throughout the presentation. The audience has a good learning experience.
     
    2 to >0 pts
    Not Evident
    Student makes poor use of the slide presentation format and the resulting product fails to communicate the topic effectively. Both the slide content and voiceover are consistently confusing or difficult to understand throughout the presentation. The time of the audience is wasted by this presentation.
    5 pts
    Total Points: 20

     

    Week Four Required and Recommended Reading/Video

    Required Reading/Video

    a. OER Starter Kit: Under section four "Teaching with OER" read the chapter "Diversity and Inclusion"

    b. John Hilton, "What Does the Research Say About OER?" (in) OER: A Field Guide for Academic Librarians

    c. BC Open Education, "Self-Publishing Guide," browse (no need to read in detail) chapter one " Look Before You Write"

    Optional Reading/Video

    Equity & Openness: Perspectives from North American Colleges and Universities - a series of blog posts on EDI work in open education by multiple authors.

    Jess Mitchell, "Tolerance for Failure: Open Education and its Ethical Edges" (video of keynote talk at Open Ed 18)

    Steven Bell and Annie Johnson, "We're Listening: Try a Textbook Listening Tour to Advance an OER Initiative" College and Research Libraries News, 2019.

    Steven Bell, "Open vs Affordable: A Balancing Act for Academic Librarians" Charleston Hub Blogs, June 2022.

    Apurva Ashok and Zoe Wake Hyde, "The Rebus Guide to Publishing Open Textbooks (so far)"

    Bob Butterfield and Cheryl Cuillier, "Inclusive Access Talking Points" (factsheet)

    Melissa Falldin and Karen Lauritsen, "Authoring Open Textbooks" (Rebus Community)

    Open Textbook Network, "Faculty Tough OER Questions" (factsheet)

    Kaitlyn Vitez (Student PIRG) "Automatic Textbook Billing: An Offer Students Can't Refuse

    R. Griffiths, et.al. "Enacting Open and Culturally Relevant Practices" (pgs. 14-26) Teaching and Learning with Open Educational Resources

    Week Four - Optional Quiz

    For each week in the course, students have the option to take a no-risk quiz to test their comprehension and recall of that week's course content. 

    In the attached document you will find all of the quiz questions with the correct answer identified, along with multiple incorrect responses. 

    For each response there is a feedback message, both for the correct and incorrect responses. 

    This document will facilitate the creation or modification of quiz content for the week two module.

    Additional Resources for Open Education

    NOTE: One element of the course content is a set of additional resources for those students who want to go beyond the required and recommended readings. This is by no means an exhaustive list - just a selectiv one. But it does offer a place within the course to add new articles of interest and particularly new studies, surveys and reports related to open education developments. Use all or any of these resources to create an "additional resources" section of the course. Instructors are strongly recommended to run a link check on this set of resources prior to inserting them into a coursesite.

    Open Education Resources (OER)

    Temple University "Discovering OER" Research Guide

    To Find Other OER Guides: do an Internet search on OER LIBGUIDE

    OER Factsheet for Adult Education

    Introductions to OER and Open Education

    OER: A Field Guide for Librarians

    OER Starter Kit

    Texas Learn OER (some is specific to Texas but otherwise a good general introductory tutorial)

    Open Education Resources: College Library Information on Policy and Practice (examples of OER programs at the college level)

    Teaching and Learning with Open Educational Resources (April 2022 - examines use of OER in community college settings)

    OER Research 

    Open Education Group (compendium of literature)

    The Impact of Open Educational Resources on Various Student Success Metrics 
    (Also known as the "Georgia State University Study"

    Open Pedagogy

    Open Pedagogy Approaches: Faculty, Library and Student Collaborations

    Open Pedagogy Notebook (compendium of OP projects)

    OER Enabled Pedagogy

    Katz and Allen "Evolving Into the Open: A Framework for Collaborative Design of Renewable Assignments"

    Pressbooks Directory of Student-Led OER (good examples of course-based open pedagogy assignments)

    Malloy and Trust "Empowering College Students to be OER Creators and Curators"

    Advocacy Reports/Studies

    Bay View Analytics (Babson Report) (national faculty survey of OER adoption)

    Bay View Analytics, "Open Education Resources: Going Mainstream" (what factors contribute to or detract from OER progress)

    The Impact of OER Initiatives on Faculty Selection of Classroom Materials (Bay View Analytics)

    Student Public Interest Research Group Publications

    Automatic Textbook Billing (challenges of inclusive access deals)

    SPARC Automatic Textbook Billing Contract Library (inclusive access)

    Open 101

    Fixing the Broken Textbook Market

    Florida State Student Textbook Survey

    Making the Case for OER (a series of blog posts from Open Oregon)

    Part One

    Part Two

    Part Three

    InclusiveAccess.Org - get the facts about InclusiveAccess (a SPARC site)

    Radtke, Trudi (SPARC). History of College Textbook Prices: Examining Past Practices and Emerging Models. (webcast presentation recorded May 24, 2022)

    Copyright/Fair Use

    Copyright Basics: Crash Course (intellectual property) - video format

    A Fair(y) Use Tale - video format

    Creative Commons information, FAQ and more

    Open Education Librarians

    Be True: We Love OER Librarians (a recorded panel session featuring four OER librarians)
    Open Oregon Educational Resources

    Specialty Topics

    Intersections of Open Education and Information Literacy (ACRL Publications in Librarianship No. 79)

    Course Tips for Student Success

    NOTE: Based on past experiences with this course, this is a set of tips (recommendations) for students designed to help them perform their best as students in this course. At the start of the course, instructors are encouraged to share this set of tips and ask students to contribute their own tips that have helped them to be successful.

     

    Students have asked if I have any general tips for how to succeed in this course.  Here are a few I would like to share:

    1. Stay on pace. Do your best to watch the videos, review required readings and keep up-to-date with assignments. Students who stay on pace each week do well in this course.

    2. Review the rubric for each assignment. This will guide you by identifying what I look for when grading your completed assignments. For example, if the rubric indicates that you need to include a particular piece of information, failing to include it results in a loss of points. Keep in mind that rubrics are your guidelines. They don't provide exact instructions for how to complete an assignment, so that's where you can express your own individuality.

    3.Start with the videos. As a past online learner myself, I know that watching the instructor's lecture videos can be, well, less than exciting - and I do what I can to keep them upbeat and interesting. I do break up the weekly lecture videos into two to four segments. Don't feel that you need to watch the entire video at regular speed. If you get what you need from a slide or I'm going over something I previously reviewed, consider speeding up the video so you spend less time viewing it. You might even consider speeding up the video the first time you watch, take notes about anything you need to review - and then go back and watch again at regular speed.

    3a. Viewing the Lecture Video - You might find that the default lecture video view in Canvas puts the instructor's camera in a spot on the slides that may block a small amount of slide text. Try experimenting with other ways to view the lecture video in Canvas using the button in the upper right hand corner of the screen - there are just a few alternate options and each has its pros and cons. Another possibility is to click on the arrow to the left of the CC button (it points upwards and slightly to the right). This allows you to view the lecture video in Panapto - where it was created. That gives you a side-by-side view of the instructor's camera and the slides - which are now unobstructed. So keep this in mind if the default view isn't to your liking.

    4. Take the no-risk quizzes. You will find a no-risk, no-grade quiz in each module that covers that week's material. Research has shown that students who take a no-risk quiz demonstrate better learning and retention of material. This is a good way to quickly test your comprehension of the course contact. It can let you know what material you may want to review.

    5. Optional readings/videos. They are indeed optional but even if you are short for time in any particular week, consider just dipping into them quickly to get a sampling of these materials. You may want to add them to your own resource list and return to them after the course is completed.

    6. Take Notes. Most students would associate note taking with sitting in a lecture or classroom and trying to capture what the instructor is teaching for later recall. When the lecture is recorded it may seem that taking  notes is redundant. After all, a student can always go back to the recorded lecture. The research of brain science and learning suggests that note taking is actually a powerful strategy for moving new learning material from short-term memory into long-term memory. Students, as they take notes while listening to a lecture, are moving the content into the part of the brain where it can be recalled at a later time. If you don't already make this your practice, consider taking notes as you go through the video lectures.

    7. Subscribe to a personal bibliographic management application. Along with taking notes, being able to keep track of resources and citations you use in the course can save lots of time later on should you need to locate a resource or citation later in the course or much later in the program. The SJSU Library makes RefWorks available for this but there are other options such as Zotero.

    Do you have a favorite tip or hack for learning, time management or any other academic success strategy? If you'd like to share it I'll consider adding it to this page.

    Sample Instructor's Course Welcome VIdeo

    Note: It can be helpful, for an asynchronous course, for the students to have a welcome message from the instructor, just as they would likely receive in an actual in-class or even an online synchronous course experience. This video provides the welcome video used in this course which could easily be replicated by any other instructor. In addition to this video, the instructor also prepares a video tour of the course syllabus.

    Sample Instructor Welcome Video