Author:
Elisa de los Rios, Oregon Open Learning
Subject:
Language Education (ESL), Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Material Type:
Game, Interactive, Lesson, Lesson Plan, Teaching/Learning Strategy
Level:
Lower Primary, Upper Primary, Middle School
Tags:
  • ELP 1
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Text/HTML

    End Punctuation in Simple Sentence Structure for Level 1 Emergent Bilingual Students

    End Punctuation in Simple Sentence Structure for Level 1 Emergent Bilingual Students

    Overview

     

    This lesson will teach students how to use common ending punctuation marks for simple sentences through discussion, activities, and creative writing within the context of the agricultural community. 

    End Punctuation

    For questions about this lesson plan or companion lessons, please contact the author, Elisa de los Ríos at erios@ontario.k12.or.us.

     

    This lesson will teach students how to use common ending punctuation marks for simple sentences through discussion, activities, and creative writing within the context of the agricultural community. 

    End Punctuation

    Please contact the author, Elisa de los Ríos, for any questions about this lesson or companion lessons at erios@ontario.k12.or.us

     

    LLESSON DESCRIPTION

    End Punctuation in Simple Sentence Structure for Level 1 Emergent Bilingual Students

    Author of the Lesson: Elisa de los Rios

    Lesson Summary/Overview:

    Essential Question: How does knowing correct ending punctuation help me to write accurate simple sentences?

    This lesson will teach students how to use common ending punctuation marks for simple sentences through discussion, activities, and creative writing within the context of the agricultural community.

    LESSON GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

    Alignment and Objectives

    Content Standards:        

    6.L.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

    6.L.6 Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.        

    Content Objectives:

    • Students will be able to identify different, common punctuation marks for ending simple sentences;
    • Students will be able to explain when to use specific punctuation marks for ending simple sentences.
    • Students will be able use correct punctuation in their own construction of simple sentences.

    ELP Standards:

    6-8 #1: construct meaning from oral presentations and literary and informational text through grade-appropriate listening, reading, and viewing

    6-8 #2: participate in grade-appropriate oral and written exchanges of information, ideas, and analyses, responding to peer, audience, or reader comments and questions

    6-8 #6: analyze and critique the arguments of others orally and in writing

    6-8 #7: adapt language choices to purpose, task, and audience when speaking and writing

    6-8 #8: determine the meaning of words and phrases in oral presentations and literary and informational text

    6-8 #9: create clear and coherent grade-appropriate speech and text

    6-8 #10: make accurate use of standard English to communicate in grade appropriate speech and writing

    Language (ELP) Objectives:

    • Students will be able to explain the difference between specific ending punctuation marks;
    • Students will be able to read simple simple sentences both aloud and to themselves;
    • Students will be able to comprehend instructions and text from both teacher and peers;
    • Students will be able to write and accurately punctuate simple sentences.

    Supporting Academic Language

    • Language Functions:
    • Write simple sentences in the target language;
    • Use correct grammar and punctuation in simple sentences;
    • Apply contextual vocabulary knowledge to writing;
    • Read aloud and to self;
    • Comprehend instructions and ask questions for clarification.

    Language Modalities:

    Visual: Drawing punctuation marks; color coding for awareness

    Auditory: Listening to instructions, peer reviews

    Reading/Writing: Writing simple sentences, vocabulary, reading peers’ sentences

    Kinesthetic: Flexible seating: on the floor at various areas in the classroom to maximize comfort; folding of fortune teller activity and game

    Vocabulary:

    • Nouns
    • Verbs
    • Articles a/an,  the
    • Conjunction and
    • Punctuation words (period, question mark, exclamation)
    • Context-specific vocabulary related to agriculture: corn, onions, watermelon,

    Syntax or Sentence Structure(s):

    • Simple sentence
    • Simple present verb tense
    • Subject Verb Object

    Discourse:

    Verbal: teacher to students; student to teacher; student to student

    Written: Simple, complete sentences

    LESSON PREPARATION

    Considerations

    Knowledge of complete sentences structure (subject/predicate)

    Knowledge of nouns, verbs, subject pronouns, articles, and simple present tense.

    Instructional Materials

    Resources, Materials, and Technology required or recommended

    End punctuation resource on Flocabulary

    • Punctuation Posters
    • Red, purple, and green Dry Erase markers
    • White board
    • Fortune Teller template
    • White paper
    • Markers, colored pencils
    • Quizziz.com independent practice End Punctuation Practice on Quizziz.com 
    • Pear Deck summative assessment

    Learning Supports

    Socio-emotional supports:

    • Praise for efforts even if answers are not completely correct;
    • Positive redirection for inaccurate answers;
    • Instructor support throughout entire lesson;

    Cultural & Linguistic Responsiveness:

    Vocabulary is contextualized to reflect the theme of the agricultural activities within  the community/state.

    Accessibility:

    • Key vocabulary with accompanying graphics are posted in the classroom;
    • Students have access to Google Slides presentation;
    • Electronic translation devices and bilingual dictionaries

    Instructional Supports

    Differentiation:

    L1 Supports:

    • Electronic/hard copy translators
    • Translanguaging
    • Heterogeneous groups with L1 partners
    • Instructor guidance

    L2 Development (by level):

    • Work with Newcomer students on Fortune Tellers/writing sentences during Group Application
    • Allow struggling Newcomer/struggling students to complete multiple choice questions only during Independent Work Time

    Enrichment:

    Students create a journal entry, (written or electronic), writing a paragraph of five sentences and using a variety of statement, interrogative and exclamatory sentences, with applicable punctuation.

    LESSON PROCEDURES

    Anticipatory Set/Motivation/Hook

    Time: 5 minutes

    Teacher Does/Students Do:

    • Tell the students that there are special symbols which help both writers and readers make the meaning of sentences clear.
    • Ask the students if they can think of any marks that are used in sentences that help to make meaning clear; Write on board or add to Google Slides
    • Show Flocabulary Punctuation Song Rap to activate schema/build background. End punctuation rap song on Flocabulary.com

    Focused Instruction (Teacher-as-Model)

    Time: 10 minutes

    Teacher Does/Students Do:

    Teacher projects punctuation poster for a period;

    Teacher explains that periods are for use with statement sentences;

    The teacher models how to write this mark on the white board using a red marker.

    Teacher explains that periods go at the end of the sentences and the function of a period is to let the reader know that it is the end of the idea/telling sentence. It helps the reader to make sense of the writing.

    Teacher writes/projects the following examples:

    1. Onions smell.
    2. Corn grows.
    3. Ali works.

    Next, the teacher posts the punctuation poster for a question mark;

    The teacher models how to write this mark on the white board using a purple marker.

    Teacher explains that questions marks are used for interrogative sentences;

    Teacher explains that a question mark also goes at the end of the sentence. The function of a question mark is to allow a writer to express a question, and to show a reader that a question is being asked.

    The teacher further explains that when we read an interrogative sentence, we raise our voice at the end so show inflection.

    Teacher writes/projects the following examples:

    1. Is corn yellow?
    2. Do onions smell?
    3. Ali works?

    The teacher calls attention to the difference in meaning that occurs when a question mark is added to the sentence instead of a period, especially in number three.

    Finally, the teacher projects/shows the punctuation poster for an exclamation point .

    The teacher models how to write this mark on the white board using a green marker.

    The teacher explains that this mark also goes at the end of a sentence; It is used to show strong emotion such as excitement, happiness, or anger.

    Teacher writes/projects the following examples:

    1. See the corn!
    2. Onions smell!
    3. Ali’s corn is delicious!

    Guided Instruction (Teacher-to-Student Joint Responsibility)

    Time: 15 minutes

    Teacher Does/Students Do:

    Project three sentences from the Google Slides which have no punctuation (Context can be adapted to audience):

    The corn grows Is corn yellow Corn is delicious

    Ask for a volunteer to read the above sentences, without punctuation.

    Call attention to how when read this way, it is very difficult to make meaning clear. Ask students which punctuation should go where?

    If students are struggling, read the first sentence a pause, as to indicate that you have come to the end of sentence one. Read it as a statement sentence to provide another clue. Do this with the second sentence, indicating an interrogatory sentence, and then with the last sentence, indicating an exclamatory sentence, as required.

    The teacher should rewrite the sentences on the white board or Google Slide as follows:

    1. The corn grows.
    2. Is corn yellow?
    3. Corn is delicious!

    The teachers should check for comprehension by asking students if they have any questions before moving on.

    The teacher then explains that students are to create Fortune Tellers.

    The teacher tells the students that they are going to watch and listen to the instructions of how to construct their Fortune Teller.

    The teacher will tell the students that when the teacher has demonstrated how to complete the Fortune Teller, they will go back to their groups, construct their own Fortune Teller, and color it as they like, but they must color the periods red, the question marks purple, and the exclamation marks green.

    Group Application (Student-to-Student Joint Responsibility)

    Time: 30 minutes

    Teacher Does/Students Do:

    Students go back to their heterogeneous groups to construct their own Fortune Tellers, as per the teachers instructions.

    Advise students that they should help each other to construct the Fortune Tellers, as needed.

    The teacher circulates around the room, providing assistance as required.

    Once students have completed their Fortune Teller, they should practice using it with at least three classmates. The object will be for students who are having their fortune told, to end up with a sentence, for which they must provide the correct punctuation.

    Tell students that they will write each of their sentences, and they should have three, in their notebooks. Students will then write the sentences that they created, with the correct ending punctuation in their notebooks.

    Explain to students that they will peer-review each other’s sentences for accuracy. Tell students to pay attention to grammar (sentences must begin with a capital letter), spelling, and of course, punctuation.)

    Individual Learning (Independent Practice and Application)

    Time: 15 minutes

    Teacher Does/Students Do:

    Explain to the students that they will now work on their own to apply the correct punctuation to seven sentences on Quizziz.com.

    Explain that they will have 30 seconds to select either a period, question mark, or exclamation mark to each sentence.

    Advise the students that they will have three more questions which have a space available for them to construct their own simple sentences: one with a period, one with a question mark, and one with an exclamation mark. They will have 2 minutes for each sentence.

    Ensure that students know that this is practice, not a test.

    Closure

    Time: 5 minutes

    Teacher Does/Students Do:

    Tell the students that they have done excellent work during this lesson. Review the punctuation posters briefly, and ask for volunteers to provide example sentences for each punctuation mark.

    Advise students that they will have an assessment, very similar to the Quizzi.com test, to assess their knowledge.

    ASSESSMENTS

    Formative Assessment

    Content: Teacher observation; Fortune Tellers; Group work; Quizziz.com

    Language: Teacher observation; Fortune Tellers; Group Work; Quizziz.com

    Plans for Summative Assessments

    Content: Students will be able to accurately punctuate a variety of sentences including statement, interrogative, and exclamatory.

    Language: Students will be able to construct one simple statement sentence, one simple interrogative sentence, and one exclamatory sentence, using correct grammar (capital at beginning of sentence) and accurate punctuation.

    EXTENSIONS

    Ideas for Key Assignments, Extensions, and Adaptations for Online Learning Environments:

    • Pear Deck for Google Slides: Used instead of Quizziz.com game
    • Students group sentences under the period, question mark, or exclamation point category.
    • Students write short stories with punctuation and peer edit each other’s work.

     

    Companion presentation link: Companion Slides to End Punctuation Lesson Plan for Emergent Bilingual Students.

    See page below for Fortune Teller printable.