Author:
Sex Ed Open Learning Project
Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lesson
Level:
Lower Primary
Grade:
K, 1, 2
Tags:
  • Anatomy
  • Gender
  • Growth and Development
  • Inclusivity
  • Menstruation
  • Oregon OER Quality Framework
  • Prevention
  • Puberty
  • Reproduction
  • SEOL
  • Sexual Health
  • Sexual Health Education
  • Sexual Orientation
  • Sexuality Education
  • Sexually Transmitted Diseases
  • seol
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Downloadable docs, Text/HTML

    Education Standards

    Respecting Ourselves, Respecting Others, K-2 Lesson 3

    Respecting Ourselves, Respecting Others, K-2 Lesson 3

    Overview

    Students will learn about respecting the gender expressions of themselves and others through short story scenarios. Students will collaborate and design alternate and respectful endings to the scenarios.

    Respecting Ourselves, Respecting Others- Lesson 3, K-2

    Lesson Description

    Lesson Title

    Respecting Ourselves, Respecting Others: K-2 Lesson 3

    Lesson Summary/Overview

    Students will learn about respecting the gender expressions of themselves and others through short story scenarios. Students will collaborate and design alternate and respectful endings to the scenarios.

    Grade Level        K-2

    Suggested Time        30-60 minutes        

    Author of the Lesson Educators from Yamhill County schools

    Objectives

    • Students will be able to define respect.
    • Students will be able to discuss the importance of respect.
    • Students will be able to give examples of how to respect those with varying gender expressions.

    Aligned Standards, Performance Indicators, and Essential Questions

    Standards Covered

    Standard 1: Students will comprehend concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention to enhance health.

    Standard 4: Students will demonstrate the ability to use interpersonal communication skills to enhance health and avoid or reduce health risks.

    Performance Indicators Covered

    • HE.1.K.8 Recognize the importance of treating others with respect including gender expression.
    • HE.1.1.8 Recognize the importance of treating others with respect including gender expression.
    • HE.1.2.8 Recognize the importance of treating others with respect including gender expression.
    • HE.1.K.7 Recognize that there are many ways to express gender.
    • HE.1.1.7 Explain that there are many ways to express gender.
    • HE.1.2.7 Recognize differences and similarities of how individuals identify regarding gender.
    • HE.4.K.5 Discuss ways to communicate respectfully with and about people of all gender identities, gender expressions and sexual orientations.
    • HE.4.1.5 Discuss ways to communicate respectfully with and about people of all gender identities, gender expressions and sexual orientations.
    • HE.4.2.5 List ways to communicate respectfully with and about people of all gender identities, gender expressions and sexual orientations.

    Essential Question(s) Covered

    • How can we show respect for others?
    • Why is it important that we show respect for others, even if they are different than we are?
    • How can we show respect for people of different gender expressions?

    Culturally Responsive Practices

    • This lesson introduces the concept that all people are different, and people are to be respected.
    • This lesson intentionally represents people of diverse gender expressions, races, and body types.
    • This lesson intentionally creates space for classroom norms and expectations for all students.
    • This lesson invites whole-class discourse and collaboration.
    • This lesson invites self-reflection and self-assessment.
    • This lesson is adaptable for students of all skill levels and abilities.
    • This lesson is adaptable for all levels of technology access.

    Information & Resources for Educators

    Information for Educators

    • We understand that this can be a hard topic to teach. Students have differing levels of understanding and acceptance of gender expressions. Regardless, students can learn to respect each other, even if we are different. Students can learn to respect themselves even if they are different.
    • This lesson is best taught after students understand the concept of gender expression.
    • This lesson can be adapted to completely offline, with printed materials, or completely virtual, with video conferencing software. For a digital adaptation, utilize breakout rooms for group work.

    Links & Materials

    Presentation Slides

    Who Am I? Poster Activity

    Multi-colored markers

    Paper

    Lesson Overview

    Before the Lesson

    • Prior to the delivery of the lesson, teachers should review the lesson materials to become familiar with the topic, language, and lesson layout.
    • There are group expectations, knowledge pre-checks, activations of prior learning, and checks for understanding embedded within the lesson.

    During the Lesson

    Step 1: Introduction & Safe Space/Respect Overview - 15 minutes

    Open the Story Slides in front of the classroom or in your virtual classroom.

    Slide 1: Respecting Ourselves, Respecting Others

    Slide 2: Safe Space

    Setting Group Norms and Activating/Pre-Checking for Prior Knowledge

    • Safe Space: Review the group norms for respectful discussions, the need to listen to each other, and the open invitation to ask questions and invite honest feedback.
    • Building on prior knowledge: What do you remember about gender expression?
    • Gender expression is how we present ourselves to the world.
    • Ask students: What is Respect? Why is it important that we treat ourselves and others with respect?
    • We show respect when our words and actions show that we care about others.
    • What do you need from others in order to feel respected? Answers may include:
    • not teasing
    • asking respectful questions
    • telling you that they like your outfit, ideas, etc.
    • How do you feel or act when you are respected? Educator or student helper will make a list of student suggestions. Answers may include:
    • happy/smiling
    • want to play together
    • want to share stories about your family
    • How do we show respect? Educator or student helper will make a list of student suggestions. Answers may include:
    • being nice
    • telling each other “good job”
    • telling people that we like their outfit/story/idea
    • How do families or communities show respect for each other? Educator or student helper will make a list of student suggestions. Answers may include:
    • Attending festivals celebrating cultures
    • removing shoes when asked in friends’ homes
    • How do we show respect even if we are different from someone else? Answers may include:
    • telling someone that we want to play a different game, and compromising by taking turns
    • telling someone that we disagree but we can still be nice to each other

    Step 2: Story Activity - 15 minutes

    Educators will read aloud 3 short scenarios from the slides about respect and gender expression. Following the scenario, educators will lead the students in a discussion with questions about how the scenario showed a lack of respect, and collaborate on solutions and ideas about how to create alternate endings to the scenarios. Use the questions as a starting point, and encourage students to share a variety of solutions.  

    Slide 3: Stories about Respect

    Educator: I will read aloud a few short stories. While you listen to the stories, think about Respect and about Gender Expression.

    Slide 4:

    “A girl comes to school in basketball shorts and a sweatshirt. She is teased for wearing boy clothes to school.”

    Slide 5:

    Class Discussion: Does it ever feel hard to stand up for someone when they are being teased? Why does it sometimes feel hard to stand up for someone when they are being teased? Can you remember a time when you were teased?

    Discussion Questions:

    1. What happened that was not respectful?
    2. What are some ways you could help this student and show respect for their gender expression?
    1. Students could interrupt the teasing with statements like: I love basketball shorts, too! or Anyone can wear what they want!
    1. What actions can the students who were doing the teasing take when they learn that they are showing disrespect?

    Remind students that there are no clothes or ways of acting that are just for boys or girls or anyone. Anyone can dress however they like!

    Slide 6:

    “A boy falls at recess and cries when his knees are scraped and bleeding. Other students tell him that he is crying like a girl baby.”

    Slide 7:

    Class Discussion: Have you ever cried when you hurt yourself?

    Where do you think the stereotype comes from that only “girl babies” cry?

    Discussion Questions:

    1. What happened that was not respectful?
    2. What actions can we take to show respect for the student’s gender expression?
    3. If you were teasing someone, what actions can you take to help them feel respected?

    Slide 8: 

    “A student gets a short haircut. At school, some reach out to touch their hair without asking permission.”

    Slide 9:

    Class Discussion: Why do you think people wanted to touch their hair? Why do we want people to ask us before touching us?

    Discussion Questions:

    1. What happened that was not respectful?
    2. How can we show respect for the student’s gender expression?
    3. What would we do if we were asked not to touch someone’s hair?

    Slide 10: Wrap-Up

    Class Discussion:

    • What can we do if we see or hear a student being bullied?
    • What can we do if we meet someone different than ourselves?

    Step 3: Checks for Understanding and Wrap-Up - 15 minutes

    Educators can choose one or all of these wrap-up activities:

    • Drawing Check:
    • Students choose one of the three presented scenarios. Students draw the story with a respectful solution.
    • Group Check: 

    Educator pairs students with a partner or group. Students will answer these questions and share answers with the class:

    • How will I treat someone when they are different from me?
    • How will I show respect for myself and my differences?
    • Verbal Check:
    • Educator: Let’s brainstorm supportive words we can say to support each other’s gender expression. What would you like someone to say to you if you were exploring your gender expression? Answers may include:
    • Anyone can wear what they want!
    • You are my friend no matter what!
    • I respect you.
    • That looks cool!
    • Tell me more about….

    After the Lesson

    • Don't Touch My Hair by Sharee Miller
    • The Other Side by Jacqueline Woodson and E. B. Lewis
    • The Sandwich Swap by Queen Rania of Jordan Al Abdullah , Kelly DiPucchio , et al.

    Educator can read books from this list throughout the week. Questions following the readings center on respect and gender expression, and can echo the discussions in this lesson.

    Additional Extension Activity

    Later in the week, educators can follow-up with discussions, books and activities about respecting others and respecting ourselves.

    1. Class discussion: How do we respect people who are different from us? How do we show respect to ourselves when we are different?
    2. Who Am I Poster:

    A. Hand out copies of this poster to students. Students fill the squares with 4 items that are important to them. Use these prompts:

    • Who is your family?
    • What foods do you like?
    • What hobbies do you enjoy?
    • What books or shows do you like?

    B. Share: Students share the drawing with a partner. Students ask respectful questions. Use these questions as examples:

    • Can you tell me about this food?
    • Who are all of the people in your family?

    Verbal Check:

    • Educator: Let’s brainstorm supportive words we can say to support each other’s gender expression. What would you like someone to say to you if you were exploring your gender expression? Answers may include:
    • Anyone can wear what they want!
    • You are my friend no matter what!
    • I respect you.
    • That looks cool!
    • Tell me more about….

    After the Lesson

    C. Display/discuss: Hang the posters on a wall or have the students lie the posters face-up on their desk. Slowly walk through the room and look at each others’ posters.

    • There are so many ways to be … You!!

    Books about respecting differences to read throughout the week:

    • Be Bigger than Hurt Feelings by Natalia Maguire and Anastasia Zababashkina
    • My Mouth is a Volcano by Julia Cook
    • The Bad Seed by Jory John and Pete Oswald
    • Respect and Take Care of Things by Cheri J. Meiners and Meredith Johnson
    • We're Different, We're the Same by Bobbi Kates and Joe Mathieu