Education Standards

Free to Be Me!, K-2 Lesson 2

Free to Be Me!, K-2 Lesson 2

Overview

In this lesson, students will deepen their understanding of gender expression through the use of anchor texts and a video. They will apply their understanding through a self-portrait that reflects an iteration of their gender expression.

Free to Be Me! -- K-2 Lesson 2

Lesson Title

Free to Be Me! (Lesson 2 of 3)

Lesson Summary/Overview

In this lesson, students will deepen their understanding of gender expression through the use of anchor texts and a video. They will apply their understanding through a self-portrait that reflects an iteration of their gender expression.

Grade Level    K-2

Suggested Time 30 Minutes per session, 3 sessions total for text/video including follow up discussions; One 45 minute session for self-portrait

License Type    CC BY-NC-SA

Author of Lesson   Willow McCormick and Jules Laaperi

Objectives

  • I can define some ways people, including myself, express gender.
  • I can explain how gender expression is part of my identity.
  • I can talk about how I express my gender.
  • I can describe how to treat people, including myself, with respect as related to gender identity.

Aligned Standards, Performance Indicators, and Essential Questions

☐ Oregon Health Standards Color Coded by Topic Category - Chart Version

☐ Oregon Health & Sexuality Education Topic Categories and Essential Questions

☐ National Sexuality Education Standards (Second Edition)

Performance Indicators Covered

Kindergarten:

  • HE.1.K.7 Recognize there are many ways to express gender.
  • HE.1.K.8 Recognize the importance of treating others with respect including gender expression.
  • HE.4.K.5 Discuss ways to communicate respectfully with and about people of all gender identities, gender expressions and sexual orientations.
  • Social Science K.3 Develop an understanding of one's own identity groups including, but not limited to, race, gender, family, ethnicity, culture, religion, and ability.
  • Social Science  K.17 Make connections identifying similarities and differences including race, ethnicity, culture, disability, and gender between self and others.

Grade 1:

  • HE.1.1.7 Explain that there are many ways to express gender.
  • HE.1.1.8 Recognize the importance of treating others with respect including gender expression.
  • HE.2.1.4 Provide examples of how friends and family influence how people think they should act on the basis of their gender.
  • HE.4.1.5 Discuss ways to communicate respectfully with and about people of all gender identities, gender expressions and sexual orientations.
  • Social Science 1.2  Identify and apply civic virtues (such as equality, freedom, liberty, respect for individual rights, diversity, equity, justice, and deliberation) when interacting with classmates, families, and the school community.
  • Social Science 1.12  Describe how individual and group characteristics are used to divide, unite, and categorize racial, ethnic, and social groups.
  • Social Science 1.13  Examine and understand your own self-identity and how it fits with the identity of the family, school, and the local community.

Grade 2:

  • HE.1.2.7 Recognize differences and similarities of how individuals identify regarding gender.
  • HE.1.2.8 Recognize the importance of treating others with respect including gender expression.
  • HE.2.2.4 Provide examples of how friends, family, media, society and culture influence how people think they should act on the basis of their gender.
  • HE.4.2.5 List ways to communicate respectfully with and about people of all gender identities, gender expressions and sexual orientations.
  • Social Science 2.4  Give examples of and identify appropriate and inappropriate use of power and its effect in creating outcomes for diverse groups.
  • Social Science 2.26  Use listening, consensus-building, and voting procedures to decide on and take informed action to interrupt injustice or promote justice in their community.

Essential Question(s) Covered

  • What does gender expression mean?
  • How is gender expression part of who we are?
  • What are ways I can express my gender?
  • How can we respect the gender expression of others?

Culturally Responsive Practices

  • How will your lesson relate and celebrate students’ cultural context, diversity and funds of knowledge?

  • Use of sheltered instruction strategies (sentence frames, multiple options for student input- drawing, telling, writing, etc.)
  • Use of classroom norm setting to create the conditions for safe and caring discourse.
  • Culturally diverse and body-positive representation in texts and self portrait exemplar.

Information & Resources for Educators

Information for Educators

In this lesson students are invited to consider and share their gender and gender expression. It is important to set the safe conditions for students to feel free to share, but it is essential not to press or require them to share if they are not ready. Review class norms around kindness toward and acceptance of others’ identities and ideas.

To prepare, be sure to preview the texts and video used in this lesson, and read all of the author notes. Then spend time anticipating student responses to the various prompts. If possible role play with a colleague on how you might respond to student responses.

Remember, it is important not to reinforce a gender binary, although it may arise in student responses. Use phrases like “all genders” instead of “both genders” and “kids across the gender spectrum” instead of “boys and girls.” If students frame their comments about gender as a binary, you can rephrase using more inclusive language. For example, if a student says, “Pink is a girl color,” you might say, “People of all genders can like any color.”

Visit Gender Spectrum to learn more about the importance of teaching about gender identity and expression to young children. On their site you can also find tips on inclusive and developmentally appropriate language to use with young children, and resources for responding to questions and concerns from caregivers.

Resource Type

Materials

It Feels Good to Be Yourself Read Aloud Video

Who Are You? The Kids’ Guide to Gender Identity Read Aloud

They, He, She, Me, Free to Be Read Aloud Video

CBC Gender--Explained video

Rubric

8.5 by 11 white construction paper

Water colors, markers, crayons, or colored pencils

Pencil

Texts:

The Gender Wheel by Maya Christina Gonzalez

It Feels Good to Be Yourself by Theresa Thorn

 They, He, She, Me: Free to be Me! by Maya Christina Gonzalez
Who are You? The Kid’s Guide to Gender Identity by Brook Pessin-Whedbee

Lesson Overview

Before the Lesson

Pre assessment: Have students reflect on their own gender and gender expression. Ask the following question:

How do you express your gender?

Allow students to tell, draw, or write about their gender expression. Use the rubric to score their responses.

During the Lesson

Step 1 (5 minutes)

Review concepts of gender and gender expression from Lesson 1: I Like You, I Like Me. Say:

Gender is more than just the body you are born with, it is also what you like, how you dress, and act. Gender is part of your identity, which is who you feel you are and how you know yourself. Gender expression is how you present yourself in the world. Some people’s gender expression stays similar from one day to the next- like ____ and ____ in the books ____ and ____. Others, like ______ change depending on their mood or environment. Some people, like _____, express their gender one way in public, and another way at home. It’s important to help others feel cared for and welcome for all parts of themselves, including how they express their gender. Remember, we cannot know someone’s gender based on their expression. For example, if someone is wearing a dress it COULD mean they identify as a girl OR that they just like dresses. Another example, just because someone has short hair, doesn’t mean they are a boy.

Step 2 (20 minutes)

Read Who are You? The Kid’s Guide to Gender Identity aloud.

Reread the following quote from Who Are You?, “The important thing to remember is that you are the one who knows you best.” Then, use the following questions to guide a follow up whole class discussion. Capture student thinking on an anchor chart using words and pictures.

-There are lots of ways to be a kid. What ways do you like to be? (Ex.  I like to be quiet. I like to be loud. I like to act serious. I like to make my friends laugh when I am silly. I like to daydream.)

-What do you like? (Use pages 10 and 11 of Who Are You? to prompt ideas. Ex. I like to play with slime. I like to play with dolls and trucks. I like to draw and make comics. I like to craft.)

-What is your personal gender expression (what you like, how you dress, and act)? (Use pages 12 and 13 of Who Are You to prompt ideas. Ex. I like to wear nail polish. I wear my hair short. I  like to dress fancy. I like comfy clothes like sweats and leggings.)

Step 3

Over the next several days read  It Feels Good to Be Yourself  and watch CBC’s Gender--Explained video to reinforce concepts from Who Are You.

Refer to They, She, He, Me Free to Be! and The Gender Wheel a story about bodies and gender for everybody for additional language to use with students or for further background for you as an educator.

Step 4 (45 minutes)

Activity:

After reading the anchor texts and watching the video, prompt students to create a self portrait with the following sentence frames mounted below the portrait. (See example of the finished product here.) Refer back to the anchor chart to reinforce their understanding of gender and gender expression.

 

Scaffold for Emergent Writers and Emergent Bilinguals: Teacher scribes the sentence frames.

I am (name), I like to wear _____ and ______. I enjoy doing ____ and _____. I feel best when ______. I like it when my friends say ______. I am free to be me!

After the Lesson

Post assessment: Utilize the self portrait and completed sentence frames to assess students’ developing understanding of gender and gender expression. Take note of misconceptions and reteach concepts using anchor texts when necessary. Use the rubric to score.

 

Extension: For students demonstrating a 3 on the rubric consider having students create a teaching book, poster, song or video about gender and gender expression for their peers.

 

You could add the layer of different venues for different expressions. For example, “At home I wear ___. At school I wear ____.”