Author:
Sex Ed Open Learning Project
Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lesson, Lesson Plan
Level:
Lower Primary
Tags:
  • Anatomy
  • Gender
  • Gender Expression
  • Gender Identity
  • Growth and Development
  • Inclusivity
  • Oregon OER Quality Framework
  • Prevention
  • Pronouns
  • Puberty
  • Respect
  • SEOL
  • Sexual Health
  • Sexual Health Education
  • Sexual Orientation
  • Sexuality Education
  • seol
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Downloadable docs, Text/HTML

    Education Standards

    Everyone Belongs! -- K-2 Lesson 3

    Everyone Belongs! -- K-2 Lesson 3

    Overview

    This lesson focuses on treating others with respect regarding gender expression. In the lesson students use their culminating understanding of gender and gender expression to create paper dolls. Then they use the dolls to role play a respectful, affirming and inclusive approach to the gender expression of  themselves and others.

    Everyone Belongs! -- K-2 Lesson 3

    Lesson Title

    Everyone Belongs! (Lesson 3 of 3)

    Lesson Summary/Overview

    This lesson focuses on treating others with respect regarding gender expression. In the lesson students use their culminating understanding of gender and gender expression to create paper dolls. Then they use the dolls to role play a respectful, affirming and inclusive approach to the gender expression of  themselves and others.

    Grade Level    K-2

    Suggested Time    Two 45 Minute Sessions

    License Type    CC BY-NC-SA

    Authors of Lesson Jules Laaperi and Willow McCormick

    Objectives

    • I can define respect.
    • I can explain some ways people, including myself, express gender.
    • I can describe how to treat people, including myself, with respect as related to gender identity.

    Aligned Standards, Performance Indicators, and Essential Questions

    ☐ Oregon Health Standards Color Coded by Topic Category - Chart Version

    ☐ Oregon Health & Sexuality Education Topic Categories and Essential Questions

    ☐ National Sexuality Education Standards (Second Edition)

    Performance Indicators Covered

    Kindergarten:

    • HE.1.K.7 Recognize there are many ways to express gender.
    • HE.1.K.8 Recognize the importance of treating others with respect including gender expression.
    • HE.4.K.5 Discuss ways to communicate respectfully with and about people of all gender identities, gender expressions and sexual orientations.
    • Social Science K.3 Develop an understanding of one's own identity groups including, but not limited to, race, gender, family, ethnicity, culture, religion, and ability.
    • Social Science  K.17 Make connections identifying similarities and differences including race, ethnicity, culture, disability, and gender between self and others.

    Grade 1:

    • HE.1.1.7 Explain that there are many ways to express gender.
    • HE.1.1.8 Recognize the importance of treating others with respect including gender expression.
    • HE.2.1.4 Provide examples of how friends and family influence how people think they should act on the basis of their gender.
    • HE.4.1.5 Discuss ways to communicate respectfully with and about people of all gender identities, gender expressions and sexual orientations.
    • Social Science 1.2  Identify and apply civic virtues (such as equality, freedom, liberty, respect for individual rights, diversity, equity, justice, and deliberation) when interacting with classmates, families, and the school community.
    • Social Science 1.12  Describe how individual and group characteristics are used to divide, unite, and categorize racial, ethnic, and social groups.
    • Social Science 1.13  Examine and understand your own self-identity and how it fits with the identity of the family, school, and the local community.

    Grade 2:

    • HE.1.2.7 Recognize differences and similarities of how individuals identify regarding gender.
    • HE.1.2.8 Recognize the importance of treating others with respect including gender expression.
    • HE.2.2.4 Provide examples of how friends, family, media, society and culture influence how people think they should act on the basis of their gender.
    • HE.4.2.5 List ways to communicate respectfully with and about people of all gender identities, gender expressions and sexual orientations.
    • Social Science 2.4  Give examples of and identify appropriate and inappropriate use of power and its effect in creating outcomes for diverse groups.
    • Social Science 2.26  Use listening, consensus-building, and voting procedures to decide on and take informed action to interrupt injustice or promote justice in their community.

    Essential Question(s) Covered

    • What is respect?
    • What does it sound like to show someone respect?
    • What does it look like to show someone respect?
    • What are ways to demonstrate respect for someone’s gender expression?

    Culturally Responsive Practices

    • How will your lesson relate and celebrate students’ cultural context, diversity and funds of knowledge?

    • Paper doll templates are representative of various body types, abilities, and sizes.
    • Paper doll templates can be printed or colored in to be any skin tone.
    • Teacher and student modeling provides language support for emerging bilinguals, along with students who experience disabilities.

    Information & Resources for Educators

    Information for Educators

    Remember, it is important not to reinforce a gender binary, although it may arise in student responses. Use phrases like “all genders” instead of “both genders” and “kids across the gender spectrum” instead of “boys and girls.” If students frame their comments about gender as a binary, you can rephrase using more inclusive language. For example, if a student says, “Pink is a girl color,” you might say, “People of all genders can like any color.”

    Visit Gender Spectrum to learn more about the importance of teaching about gender identity and expression to young children. On their site you can also find tips on inclusive and developmentally appropriate language to use with young children, and resources for responding to questions and concerns from caregivers.

    Materials

    Paper Doll Sample

    Paper Doll Templates printed on a variety of skin toned paper, or white paper for students to color in with the tone of their choice

    Colored Pencils, Crayons, Markers

    Scissors

    Glue

    Optional: Fabric, yarn, magazine clippings, painted paper, and other 3-D materials for decorating paper dolls.

    Lesson Overview

    Before the Lesson

    Review class norms around kindness toward and acceptance of others’ identities and ideas.

    Review key ideas about gender and gender expression using anchor charts and student created artifacts from the previous lessons.

    During the Lesson

    Step 1 (45 minutes)

    In the first 45 minute session students can select to make a paper doll of themselves, a character from one the anchor texts from Lesson 1 or 2, or create a made up character. Use the process grid from Lesson 1  to remind students of some of the key characters and their attributes. Give students time with partners to brainstorm ideas for their dolls. Listen in to their conversations, then invite a few students to share ideas representing a range of gender and gender expressions. Then release students to create their own dolls.

    Step 2

    After modeling using your own doll, ask them to introduce their completed character to the class using the following questions:

    -What is the character’s name?

    -What are your character’s pronouns?

    -How does this character express their gender?

    -What can their friends say to show care and respect?

    Step 3 (45 minutes)

    In the second 45 minute session, students gather their paper dolls on the carpet. The teacher uses example paper dolls to model the following role play:

    - Hi, what is your name?

    - My name is _____. What is yours?  

    - My name is _____.

     

    - What are your pronouns?

    - Thank you for asking! My pronouns are _____. What are your pronouns?

    - My Pronouns are _____

     

    - Nice! I like to ______. What do you like to do?

    - Thanks for sharing! I like to ______.

     

    - I like to wear ____, ____, and _____. What do you like to wear?

    - Awesome! I like to wear ____, ____, and ____.

     

    - I like who you are! Do you want to play together?

    - Yes! I like you, too!

     

    Ask a student to practice/model with the teacher using similar language.

    Then, ask a pair of students to model for the class.

    Step 4 (10 minutes)

    Then the dolls play. Have students complete the activity in partnerships. Consider strategic partnerships based on rubric scores from previous lessons.

    After the Lesson

    Once students have role played using their dolls a few times, post the dolls on a bulletin board with the following speech bubbles and messages:

    • Be who you are!
    • I am free to be me!
    • You belong just the way you are!
    • Celebrate yourself and others!
    • I like you! I like me!

     

    Extension: Have students come up with their own key phrases centering on treating others with respect.

     

    Post assessment:

    For a second time, ask students to write, draw, and/or tell the answer to the following prompt:

    Gender expression means how people of different genders, for example boys, girls, nonbinary folks, express their gender through clothing, hair style, etc. Do you think there are rules for gender expression? Tell what you know about how people express their gender.

     

    Compare with student responses from before Lesson 1: I like you, I like me! Score student understanding using this rubric. Reinforce key ideas as needed, based on individual assessment data.