Author:
Arts ESU2
Subject:
Visual Arts, Physical Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Upper Primary
Tags:
  • NE Art
  • NE Science
  • NE Visual Arts
  • Nebraska Department of Education
  • Science
  • ne-art
  • ne-science
  • ne-visual-arts
  • science
  • waves
  • License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike
    Language:
    English

    Education Standards

    Beautiful Creative Writing Character Sketch

    Beautiful Creative Writing Character Sketch

    Overview

    This resource was created by Jenny Bauer, in collaboration with Dawn DeTurk, Hannah Blomstedt, and Julie Albrecht, as part of ESU2's Integrating the Arts project. This project is a four year initiative focused on integrating arts into the core curriculum through teacher education, practice, and coaching.

    Lesson Title: Beautiful Creative Writing Character Sketch

    Content Area: ScienceFine Arts Area: Visual Arts
    Grade Level: 4thTeacher: Jennifer Bauer
    Standards and Alignment
    Content Area Standard:Science - light wavesSC.4.2.1.B - Students will investigate, generate, and compare multiple solutions that use patterns to transfer information. Students will describe how energy can be transferred from place to place by sound, light, heat, and electrical currents.Fine Arts Standard:FA 5.2.3.a Identify and describe use of media (glossary) (e.g., paint, clay, collage) and techniques to create subject matter (glossary), visual elements (glossary) and mood.
    Key Vocabulary:color, primary colors, secondary colors, tertiary colors, neutrals, pattern, light waves, electromagnetic waves, transparent, translucent, opaque, speed of lightMaterials List:cardstock/watercolor paper, compass, pencil, eraser, ruler, tempera paint (red, yellow, blue), paint brushes, cups, water, paper towels, string, scissors, the following image

     

    Instructional Delivery
    1. Students will use a compass and a ruler to split the pre-drawn circle into 12 equal parts.
    2. Students will paint the primary colors (red, yellow, blue) with yellow at the top and three empty spaces between each of the primary colors.
    3. Students will mix the secondary colors (green, violet, and orange) using the primary colors.
    1. Students will mix red + yellow = orange. Orange will go in the middle space between red and yellow on the circle. When mixing, they can add a little bit more yellow to get the tertiary color yellow-orange (put on the circle between yellow and orange), and a little bit more red to get the tertiary color red-orange (put on the circle between red and orange).
    2. Students will mix blue + yellow = green. Green will go in the middle space between blue and yellow on the circle. When mixing, they can add a little bit more yellow to get the tertiary color yellow-green (put on the circle between yellow and green), and a little bit more blue to get the tertiary color blue-green (put on the circle between blue and green).
    3. Students will mix blue + red = violet. Violete will go in the middle space between blue and red on the circle. When mixing, they can add a little bit more blue to get the tertiary color blue-violet (put on the circle between blue and violet), and a little bit more red to get the tertiary color red-violet (put on the circle between red and violet).
    1. Once dry, students will cut the circle out of the cardstock/watercolor paper and poke two holes in the center, about ¼-½ inch apart.
    2. Students will run 36-48 inches of string through the holes and tie the ends together.
    3. Students will hold the string in each hand and twist it. Then they will pull the string to make it spin.
    4. Questions to ask the students:
    1. What pattern do you see when it spins?
    2. What colors do you see?
    3. What colors seem to mix when it spins?
    4. Can you “make” certain colors when you spin in a certain way? For example, can you make green? Orange? Violet?
    5. Can you make any neutrals like gray, brown, or white?
    6. Can you make stripes?
    7. What else can you make?
    8. Review: how did you use paint to make this color wheel? What are the primary colors? Secondary colors? Tertiary colors? Neutrals?
    9. After completion of the activity, the students will read “What is light?”, which is located in their science journals. They will answer comprehension questions on the reading.
    10. The Science behind the blending illusions or the disappearing colors: Light is all of the colors in one: white. When the wheel spins up to the right speed, the colors blend into a near-recreation of white light. This “white” wheel is created because your eyes cannot keep up with the rapid rate at which the individual colors are spinning (information retrieved from https://www.stevespanglerscience.com/lab/experiments/disappearing-color-wheel/).

     

    Assessment and Reflection
    Content Assessment: Students will answer the following questions in their notebooks:What type of wave is light?How fast does light travel?What is light?How do light waves travel?What do scientists call diagrams of light?How long has the sunlight we see been traveling?Arts Assessment:Students will identify the primary colors used in the color wheel.
    Student Reflection:Students will reflect on their activity by answering the following questions on their color wheel in the content assessment.Teacher Reflection:The teacher will write notes as documentation of how the lesson went (positives, negatives) for future use of the lesson.