All resources in Scholarly Communication Notebook

Leveraging Open Educational Resources to Advance Diversity,…

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This guide is designed to support the integration of OER and DEI efforts within higher education institutions. Based on research funded by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation that examined the strategies and experiences of the sixty-six colleges, universities, and state systems that participated in AAC&U’s inaugural, yearlong Institute on Open Educational Resources (2021–22), this publication provides evidence-based guidance and best practices that result in initiative sustainability and broad adoption of OER by strategically connecting this work to DEI goals, strategies, policies, initiatives, and offices that also exist within a given educational context.

Material Type: Reading

Authors: Anastasia Karaglani, C. Edward Watson, Judith Sebesta, Lisa Petrides, Selena Burns

Peralta Online Equity Rubric for Distance Education

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The Peralta CC District developed an Equity Rubric instrument designed to help online instructors make the learning experience more equitable for all students. The rubric’s criteria is roughly aligned with the CVC-OEI Course Design Rubric. It includes strategies to increase students’ access to technology and different types of support (both academic and non-academic); and make explicit the instructor’s commitment to inclusion by addressing some design principles through an equity lens.

Material Type: Assessment

Author: Peralta Community College Office of Distance Education

OER Student Advocate Toolkit

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This toolkit was created by OER student leaders in the CCC and CSU systems. The toolkit's purpose is to motivate students to get involved in OER advocacy and the Open Education movement, as well as make it known that students can make a difference in their education. Education costs can be cut to a fraction of the price with OER, which would allow for more students to be able to access knowledge and higher education. While this toolkit contains some examples and suggestions specific to California institutions, it can still be helpful for all college students. Thanks to the Michelson 20MM Foundation's financial support students were paid for their work and contributions in creating this document, as well as presenting at conferences.

Material Type: Full Course, Primary Source, Reading, Student Guide

Authors: Barbara Illowsky, Ryan Erickson-Kulas, Jenifer Vang, Trudi Radtke, Natalie Miller, Timothy Maldonado, Ashley Chavez, Carlos Espinoza, Laura Cruz, Kelsey Smith, Edwin Hernandez Armenta

Advocacy for OER and Open Textbooks

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This presentation was prepared for the Council of Australian University Librarians OER Collective Community.  The Community comprises mostly library staff who are supporting the production of open texts at thier institutions, many of whom are new to OER and open textbooks.  The aim was to provide a foundation for advocacy for the adoption, adaptation, and authoring of open textbooks locally.  Therefore, it establishes a shared definition and purpose of advocacy, especially as it relates to openness, and then provides six practical strategies for advocates that could be adapted and implemented for local contexts.

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Adrian Stagg

Remix

OER Academy: Leadership & Advocacy

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This module in our training series provides participants with an exploration of OER leadership and advocacy. We have designed these modules to first spark the learner's interest in the topics covered and then dig deeper into the content through presentations, storytelling, and demonstrations of the tools. We will offer opportunities for learners to practice exploring the resources and tools, and reflect on how they might use them in their work.

Material Type: Module

Author: Megan Simmons

The Open License Playbook Webinar

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Open licensing of instructional materials such as textbooks, videos, and other related resources makes possible free sharing and remixing which reduces cost barriers for students. Creative Commons provides the legal infrastructure for easily sharing creative works including instructional materials but how do the different licenses indicate a resource can be re-used. Join us for an interactive session of playbook license scenarios where you test your knowledge of the OER re-use based on license type.

Material Type: Lecture, Lecture Notes

Permissions Guide For Educators

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This guide provides a primer on copyright and use permissions. It is intended to support teachers, librarians, curriculum experts and others in identifying the terms of use for digital resources, so that the resources may be appropriately (and legally) used as part of lessons and instruction. The guide also helps educators and curriculum experts in approaching the task of securing permission to use copyrighted materials in their classrooms, collections, libraries or elsewhere in new ways and with fewer restrictions than fair use potentially offers. The guide was created as part of ISKME's Primary Source Project, and is the result of collaboration with copyright holders, intellectual property experts, and educators.

Material Type: Reading

Author: Admin

Creative Commons for Educators and Librarians

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This open access book is tailored to educators and librarians to teach them more about how to use and apply creative commons licenses. The book covers the basics of copyright law and licensing, as well as how to choose, find, and use creative commons licensed materials. There is an entire section of the book specifically dedicated to creative commons for educators and librarians, including chapters on open access to scholarship, open pedagogy, open educational resources, and more.

Material Type: Reading

Author: 2020 Creative Commons

Open Pedagogy Approaches: Faculty, Library, and Student Collaborations

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The entire spirit of this book project reflects the editors’ shared belief in the power of an open and inclusive community, of learning, and of collaboration toward innovation. From the outset, the editors knew that this book would be an open project in its own right. It had to be published openly (to practice what we preach), and it would serve as an opportunity to learn the process of creating an open book from start to finish, including, for example, developing review criteria that would ensure rigor, diversity, inclusion, and ingenuity while drawing from the open community to involve both novice and expert OP practitioners both as authors and readers.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Alexis Clifton, Kimberly Davies Hoffman

Open Pedagogy in Practice: A Support Primer for Librarians

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This resource is intended to provide practitioners with introductory, practical content that they can learn from and adapt to better support their own campus Open Education efforts, particularly Open Pedagogy. It is not intended to be an extensive or exhaustive resource about the educational theories and frameworks out of which Open Pedagogy has emerged, as there are several other wonderful resources that cover that information. It includes a podcast series of teaching faculty interviews that will be helpful for other faculty seeking to learn more about their peers’ experiences with open pedagogy, and librarians will benefit from hearing firsthand perspectives so they can better understand the necessary support. Also included are one-shot lesson plans intended to assist academic librarians tasked with supporting faculty embarking on open pedagogy projects, however, we recognize that it often takes a village, and individuals in other roles will also benefit from these (adaptable) lesson plans.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Lesson Plan

Authors: Lindsey Gumb, Mandi Goodsett

Perspectives on Scholarly Communication: A Student-Created Open Textbook

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Project: This project involves the experimental use of open pedagogy to teach the Scholarly Communication course in a graduate-level library and information science (LIS) program. Open pedagogy is variously defined, but generally understood as a framework that requires students to be active creators of course content rather than passive consumers of it. Proponents view this as a form of experiential learning in which students demonstrate greater understanding of content by virtue of creating it. Students in this course learn by doing; that is, they learn about scholarly communication by participating in the process. Each student is required to develop a chapter—on a scholarly communication topic of their choosing—to be included in an open access monograph. Following the semester, the text is published under a Creative Commons license on the University at Buffalo’s institutional repository as an open educational resource (OER), allowing for reuse or repurposing in future sections of the course or in similar courses in LIS programs at other institutions. To date, students have created the following open monographs: Perspectives on Scholarly Communication, Volume 1 (2019), Perspectives on Scholarly Communication, Volume 2 (2020); and Perspectives on Scholarly Communication, Volume 3 (2021). Support for the development and production of the third volume was provided by way of the following grant: Scholarly Communication Notebook (https://lisoer.wordpress.ncsu.edu/notebook/); Institute of Museum and Library Services (https://www.imls.gov/grants/awarded/lg-36-19-0021-19. Investigators: Will Cross (wmcross@ncsu.edu); Josh Bolick (jbolick@ku.edu); and Maria Bonn (mbonn@illinois.edu). Outcomes: Immediate outcomes of the “learn by doing” aspect are clear. The experience of publishing engages students in the applied side of concepts they are introduced to by way of lectures, readings, and other class activities. This experience is invaluable for those entering the field academic librarianship, and particularly for those who will have scholarly communication responsibilities. Immediate outcomes of the open pedagogy aspect are compelling. Research shows that students ascribe a positive learning experience to the implementation of this framework, and they hold for its continued use in future sections of the course. Students are enthusiastic in their embrace of creating renewable versus disposable coursework. They express great satisfaction with contributing to the professional literature, building the discipline’s nascent OER record, and having a publication to feature in their curricular and professional dossiers. The experience also resonates with students on a philosophical level; LIS students are particularly inclined to support activities that align with the field’s abiding ethic of “free to all”. Long-term outcomes for the course are emerging. Select chapters from these volumes are used as required readings. In this way, students are contributing to professional discourse and to the ongoing development of LIS curricula. A roadmap for this ongoing experiment is given by way of the syllabus, assignments, lectures, rubrics, and other related materials in this Open Science Framework project.

Material Type: Full Course, Homework/Assignment, Syllabus

Author: Christopher Hollister

Open Education Pedagogy

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A short introduction video about open education pedagogy for simple education purposes. The goal is to help educational organizations increase inclusivity, belonging, equity and diversity. This is done by designing curriculum with the student, instead of for the student.

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Kristopher Chew

Contextualised open educational practices: Towards student agency and self-directed learning

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This book covers original research on the implementation of open educational practices through the use of open educational resources at the university level. The emphasis on open education in this book is on contextualising resources, supporting student agency and fostering self-directed learning specifically within a South African milieu. The envisaged chapters cover conceptual and review research and empirical work focussing on open educational practices and the use of renewable assessments. The work starts off with an overview of an institutional-wide open education project that prompted the research followed by research on open education in terms of various modules in the health science, music education, law, philosophy, dietetics, anthropology, French language learning, journalism and political science. There is a clear gap in the literature on open education in terms of open educational practices, specifically in terms of contextualising resources, supporting student agency and fostering self-directed learning in a South African context. Despite the existence of some general works on open education in terms of policy, social justice and open textbooks, this book will be unique in exploring the intersections of openness, specifically with contextualisation, student agency and self-directedness.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Amit Dhakulkar, Byron J. Bunt, Charlene du Toit-Brits, Jako Olivier