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Are your ChIP antibodies skewing your data?
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This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"It’s a feared moment for every scientist: the discovery that years of painstaking research has led to results that can't be repeated. Many think that poorly characterized antibodies have contributed to this reproducibility crisis more than any other laboratory tool. A new study published in Molecular Cell supports this hypothesis, at least in the context of chromatin immunoprecipitation. Although accurate ChIP interpretation depends on near-perfect antibody specificity, the report shows that many of these reagents are far less capable than their advertising suggests, which calls into question several widely accepted paradigms on genomic regulation. The study focused on histone post-translational modifications; specifically all three methylation states of lysine 4 on histone H3. Through ChIP experiments, H3K4 methylation has been strongly linked to transcriptional control..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Biology
Chemistry
Life Science
Physical Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
09/20/2019
Association between Neu5Gc carbohydrate and serum antibodies against it provides the molecular link to cancer
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CC BY
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This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"Consuming high amounts of red meat is commonly linked to an increased risk of developing cancer, especially colorectal cancer. At the same time, antibodies against Neu5Gc , a carbohydrate derived from red meat, have been observed to worsen cancer in “human-like” mice. While these antibodies and red meat consumption are each believed to increase cancer risk, it remains unknown how diet affects the antibodies. Now, research suggests that consuming Neu5Gc from red meat and dairy can modulate the amounts and properties of anti-Neu5Gc antibodies in humans, providing clues to how the carbohydrate might be linked to cancer. The team behind the study calculated daily intake of Neu5Gc for more than 19,000 subjects aged 18 years or older. These participants provided regular logs of food consumed over 24-hour periods as part of the NutriNet-Santé study, which was designed to investigate relationships between nutrition and health status..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Applied Science
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Life Science
Nutrition
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
02/26/2021
Biology
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CC BY
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Biology is designed for multi-semester biology courses for science majors. It is grounded on an evolutionary basis and includes exciting features that highlight careers in the biological sciences and everyday applications of the concepts at hand. To meet the needs of today’s instructors and students, some content has been strategically condensed while maintaining the overall scope and coverage of traditional texts for this course. Instructors can customize the book, adapting it to the approach that works best in their classroom. Biology also includes an innovative art program that incorporates critical thinking and clicker questions to help students understand—and apply—key concepts.

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
08/22/2012
Biology: B Lymphocytes (B cells)
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This 14-minute video lesson provides an overview of B cells (B lymphocytes) and how they are activated and produce antibodies. [Biology playlist: Lesson 53 of 71].

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Khan Academy
Author:
Salman Khan
Date Added:
05/18/2012
Exploring crosstalk between post-translational modifications in half the time
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CC BY
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This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"A new method for identifying post-translational modifications in proteins promises to cut biomedical researchers’ workload in half. Enabling multiple affinity enrichment procedures to be run in parallel, the one-pot method yields the same search results as traditional methods in less time and from less tissue. As proteomics researchers know well, identifying post-translational modifications in biological samples can be tedious. Enriching samples with target modifications, such as the attachment of acetyl , succinyl or methyl groups to amino acid residues, and matching experimental data with catalogued results involves numerous steps. And the work load is only getting bigger. With exploding interest in how multiple modifications are linked across the vast proteome , the amount of time and the amount of sample required for exploration are skyrocketing in proportion. But with the new one-pot enrichment method, that could soon change..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Biology
Chemistry
Life Science
Physical Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
09/20/2019
Fighting Back! (Lesson)
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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This lesson describes the major components and functions of the immune system and the role of engineers in keeping the body healthy (e.g., vaccinations and antibiotics, among other things). This lesson also discusses how an astronaut's immune system is suppressed during spaceflight due to stress and other environmental factors.

Subject:
Anatomy/Physiology
Applied Science
Engineering
Life Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Denali Lander
Janet Yowell
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Teresa Ellis
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Immunoglobulin A
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CC BY-NC-ND
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IgA is present at low concentrations in plasma, and has minimal function inside the body. However, it is specially adapted for action at mucosal surfaces and as such, is present in high concentrations in mucosal secretions and in colostrum (and milk). In many species (dogs, cats and pigs), it is the major antibody in

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
WikiVet
Provider Set:
Blood
Date Added:
02/11/2015
Immunoglobulin D
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CC BY-NC-ND
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IgD is present in ruminants, pigs, dogs and rodents but has not been identified in horses, cats, rabbits and chickens. It is mainly expressed on the surface of B-cells i.e. it is never secreted.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
WikiVet
Provider Set:
Blood
Date Added:
02/11/2015
Immunoglobulin E
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CC BY-NC-ND
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Unlike IgM, IgG and IgA, IgE does not function as a soluble antibody, with binding to Fc? receptors required before it can bind to the target antigen, and is found in low levels in blood plasma. Like IgA, it is produced by plasma cells and is mainly localised to mucosal surfaces.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
WikiVet
Provider Set:
Blood
Date Added:
02/11/2015
Immunoglobulin G
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CC BY-NC-ND
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IgG is the major antibody in blood plasma, and constitutes at least 80% of all antibodies in the body. It is the smallest immunoglobulin, so can readily leave the blood plasma and enter tissues. They can also cross the placenta, providing adaptive immunity to the foetus when the mother is under attack. IgG is also present in breast milk.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
WikiVet
Provider Set:
Blood
Date Added:
02/11/2015
Immunoglobulin M
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CC BY-NC-ND
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IgM is the primordial antibody and, although a monomer, is secreted as a pentamer (five monomers joined by disulphide bonds with two monomers joined by a J chain). This gives it ten identical antigen binding sites although IgM usually has relatively low affinity for its antigen. Its heavy chain is type mu (ľ).

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
WikiVet
Provider Set:
Blood
Date Added:
02/11/2015
Immunoglobulins - Overview
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CC BY-NC-ND
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Also called antibodies, Immunoglobulins (Ig) are the soluble form of B cell receptors (BCR) released by plasma cells after they have been activated. Immunoglobulins have to bind to a number of different antigens in a variety of environments and as such there are several different immunoglobulin classes. Each class has an optimum environment of action.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
WikiVet
Provider Set:
Blood
Date Added:
02/11/2015
Immunology
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This sequence explores the elements of innate and acquired immune defense mecahnisms, the cells involved, their development and maturation, and biomolecular cellular communication mechanisms required to successfully fight off infection.

Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
University of Michigan
Provider Set:
Open.Michigan
Author:
Wesley Dunnick
Date Added:
01/19/2010
Opportunities and challenges of using metagenomic data to bring uncultured microbes into cultivation
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CC BY
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This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"Microbial life can be found in nearly every environment on earth. These tiny organisms can significantly impact their surroundings, be it deep-sea microbes influencing the ecology of the ocean floor or the human gut microbiome affecting health. Metagenomics, or the analysis of microbial DNA in different environments, has dramatically increased what is known about microbial life. These sequencing-based techniques are not dependent on culturing microbes, which can be an incredibly difficult undertaking. However, isolating and cultivating microbes remains important to both confirm and expand upon those results. Moreover, cultivated microbes could potentially be used as probiotics or biocontrol agents or for industrial purposes. To date, most environmental microbes remain uncultured, but metagenomic data can be leveraged to help researchers isolate and cultivate new ones..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
05/18/2022
Somapacitan, a once-weekly reversible albumin-binding GH derivative, in children with GH deficiency
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CC BY
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This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"This study evaluated the safety, local tolerability, pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of a once-weekly drug candidate versus once-daily growth hormone in children with growth hormone deficiency. This phase 1 trial was conducted in 14 pediatric endocrinology clinics in eight countries. The drug candidate – somapacitan – is a growth hormone derivative that binds reversibly to albumin in the blood, resulting in an extended half-life and prolonged effects. Because of this, the frequency of administration of this medication can be reduced. Somapacitan is injected subcutaneously using a prefilled pen. Clinical trials in adults have suggested the feasibility of a once-weekly dosing regimen of somapacitan based on its PK/PD profile. However, no such study has been conducted for children with growth hormone deficiency. Until now. To evaluate its safety in children, researchers studied 32 boys and girls aged 6 to 13 with a confirmed diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Applied Science
Biology
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
09/20/2019
Species-targeted sorting and cultivation of commensal gut bacteria under anaerobic conditions
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CC BY
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This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"Next-generation sequencing has fostered an explosion of microbiome research. Due to the role our microbiota play in health, there is growing interest in cultivating beneficial bacterial strains for ‘next-generation probiotics’. However, many important species are difficult to cultivate. _Faecalibacterium prausnitzii_ is associated with healthy gut microbiota but is extremely oxygen sensitive, and _Christensenella minuta_ is a health-associated keystone species that is under-represented in the microbial community. A previously described cell sorter modified for anaerobic sorting conditions could be used to isolate sensitive strains of bacteria like this. First, researchers established that reference strains of _F. prausnitzii_ and _C. minuta_ had only minor viability loss during sorting and culture in this system. Then. they generated polyclonal antibodies against _F. prausnitzii _and _C. minuta_..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
05/17/2022