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CCD & Calcareous Ooze Assignment
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The assignment pre-tests student understanding of the CCD, lysocline, calcareous ooze, and the deposition of marine sediments near mid-ocean ridges and ocean basins.

(Note: this resource was added to OER Commons as part of a batch upload of over 2,200 records. If you notice an issue with the quality of the metadata, please let us know by using the 'report' button and we will flag it for consideration.)

Subject:
Biology
Chemistry
Life Science
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Teach the Earth
Author:
Cynthia Lampe
Date Added:
12/11/2020
Ion-Exchange Chromatography
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We now know how to analyze pure compounds, but what if we have a mixture? Spectrophometry becomes quite complex when dealing with multiple species of compounds at once. In order to purify a compound we can separate if from a mixture based on its intrinsic chemical properties. Remember that fluorescein is negatively charged at a pH above pKa of the carboxyl group. We can take advantage of this fact and use its attraction to positive charges to separate it from other molecules. In ion-exchange chromatography, we will use a stationary phase with a positive charge, allowing negatively charged molecules to bind and positively charged species to flow through. We can then disrupt this interaction and retrieve our now-purified molecule, and use spectrophotometric analysis of our purified fractions to determine how well we were able to separate our molecules.

Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture Notes
Student Guide
Textbook
Date Added:
02/06/2015
Understanding the many functions of wood-degrading bacteria in the termite gut
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This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"The termite gut is the world’s smallest bioreactor and the most efficient system for breaking down biomass. To learn how this mini-digester might one day be scaled up to a technologically meaningful level, researchers examined the structure and function of the gut microbiomes from 11 termite genera which were grouped by diet into plant-fiber feeders and soil feeders. Both groups had similar bacterial flora. But subtle differences did emerge, with each termite species harbouring a unique set of genes encoding for breaking down plant biomass. Future metagenomics studies could help refine the specific functions of different bacterial genes within the termite gut, allowing for better insight into the termite–bacteria relationship and teasing out capabilities that could help bring these microscopic reactors to the macroscale..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
11/03/2020
Virtual Marine Sediment Core Collection
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CC BY-NC-SA
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A primary objective of marine science classes is to learn the location and formation of ocean sediment types. Nearly 50 years of scientific ocean drilling has produced a tremendous scientific collection of cores from the global ocean floor. In addition, there are large online databases and related publications that have a wealth of associated information to supplement physical cores. Here we created a virtual marine core collection that provides exemplars of the primary ocean sediment lithologies, along with links to expedition reports and datasets, and tips for making requests for real core samples to use in education.

(Note: this resource was added to OER Commons as part of a batch upload of over 2,200 records. If you notice an issue with the quality of the metadata, please let us know by using the 'report' button and we will flag it for consideration.)

Subject:
Biology
Chemistry
Geology
Life Science
Oceanography
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Teach the Earth
Author:
Kristen St. John
Date Added:
05/11/2022
pKa of Fluorescein
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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Previously, we showed how different compounds absorb light. The chemical structure of a molecule determines exactly how much light it absorbs, as well as which wavelengths are absorbed. It stands to reason then, that by removing an atom from a molecule, we can change the way it absorbs light. In this experiment, we will relate these two concepts by measuring the absorbance of a molecule under acidic and basic conditions. The changing pH will allow us to find how strongly a specific hydrogen is attached to our molecule, and we will observe how the changing chemical structure affects the observed absorbance. Afterwards, using mathematical analysis, we can experimentally determine the pKa, or affinity of our hydrogen to our parent molecule.

Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Student Guide
Date Added:
02/06/2015