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Nuclear import of doublecortin points to anticancer target in glioblastoma
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This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"Despite advances in therapy, the prognosis and survival of patients with glioblastoma remain dismal. Part of the reason is poor targeting. The sheer complexity of tumor growth at the molecular scale makes it difficult to pinpoint the origin of gliomas. In recent years, more targeted research has led to the discovery of chains of molecular events that regulate glioma development, including the unusual trafficking of proteins into the nucleus of glioma cells. In a new study, researchers examined this glioma-related behavior for the protein doublecortin (DCX). DCX is a neuronal protein crucial for the formation of new neurons in adulthood and for neuronal migration. While researchers have looked at how glioma cells shuttle different proteins to their nucleus, this marked the first time that scientists zeroed in on DCX. The team found that high accumulation of DCX in the nucleus boosted the invasiveness of glioma cells, whereas blocking the nuclear import of DCX reduced glioma proliferation..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
10/29/2020
Protein expression patterns provides clues to tumor formation in familial adenomatous polyposis
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CC BY
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This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an inherited disorder characterized by the formation of up to several thousand tumors in the rectum and colon. FAP is usually caused by a mutation of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. While the molecular changes linking this mutation to tumor formation are not fully understood, dysregulated apoptosis—a form of programmed cell death—is known to play a prominent role. Now, researchers have uncovered a pattern of expression of an apoptosis-regulating protein that may help explain how FAP tumors form. The protein is called apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain, or ARC. The team examined the expression of ARC in 212 FAP tumor samples from 80 patients. They found that ARC was expressed in the cytoplasm of most tumor cells, as well as in the nuclei..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
02/26/2021
RanGAP helps regulate the lifespan of neural stem cells in Drosophila
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CC BY
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This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"The trafficking of proteins into and out of the nucleus is central to cell function In fruit flies, the process also seems to determine the fate of neural stem cells in the larval central brain Neural stem cells are essential to neurogenesis, a two-step process in Drosophila The cells first form during embryogenesis At the end of neurogenesis, the cells divide terminally and exit the cell cycle, producing new neurons A build up of the protein Prospero in the nucleus initiates this exit But what causes this accumulation? Researchers report that Prospero uses RanGAP to shuttle across the nuclear envelope Eliminating RanGAP function doesn’t affect the nuclear import of Prospero, but rather its export out of the nucleus This suggests a drop in RanGAP levels could entrap Prospero in the nucleus, hinting that an intrinsic mechanism determines the fate of neural stem cells in Drosophila and perhaps other organisms as well Wu, D., et al..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
09/20/2019
Take Charge!
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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Students come to understand static electricity by learning about the nature of electric charge, and different methods for charging objects. In a hands-on activity, students induce an electrical charge on various objects, and experiment with electrical repulsion and attraction.

Subject:
Applied Science
Career and Technical Education
Electronic Technology
Engineering
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Daria Kotys-Schwartz
Denise Carlson
Joe Friedrichsen
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Sabre Duren
Xochitl Zamora Thompson
Date Added:
09/18/2014