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Alirocumab lowers atherogenic lipids in patients with metabolic syndrome to potentially lower cardiovascular risk
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This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"Individuals with metabolic syndrome have a 2-fold increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but few strategies provide adequate cardiovascular risk reduction for this group. One option to lower this risk is to reduce atherogenic lipids, particularly low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Statins are a recommended first-line therapy for this purpose, but this approach doesn’t always provide sufficient LDL-C lowering to optimally reduce cardiovascular risk. Now, researchers have shown that alirocumab, a proprotein converstase subtilisin/kexin type 9 inhibitor, or PCSK9 inhibitor, approved for LDL-C reduction, may address this need. Pooled clinical trial data from ten phase 3 clinical trials from the ODYSSEY clinical development program showed alirocumab significantly lowered LDL-C in individuals both with and without metabolic syndrome..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
09/20/2019
Benefits of a low-calorie diet for type 2 diabetes
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This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"New research suggests that a low-calorie diet might help reverse symptoms of type 2 diabetes in men with obesity. The findings of the study add to a growing body of evidence indicating that diabetes is a reversible condition. Authors of the study looked at 18 men in South Africa who were over the age of 35, had class III obesity, and were on insulin treatment for diabetes. The participants were randomized to one of two groups: one followed a commercially available low-fat, low-calorie diet consisting of vegetables and a vegetable-soup-based meal plan; while the control group received a calorie-restricted meal plan. All participants were encouraged to engage in physical activity according to their abilities and to visit a counseling psychologist at least once a month. Over the course of 6 months, the team tracked the men’s levels of blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin, or HbA1c—using those measures to establish diabetes status..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Life Science
Nutrition
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
09/20/2019
Biology
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CC BY
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Biology is designed for multi-semester biology courses for science majors. It is grounded on an evolutionary basis and includes exciting features that highlight careers in the biological sciences and everyday applications of the concepts at hand. To meet the needs of today’s instructors and students, some content has been strategically condensed while maintaining the overall scope and coverage of traditional texts for this course. Instructors can customize the book, adapting it to the approach that works best in their classroom. Biology also includes an innovative art program that incorporates critical thinking and clicker questions to help students understand—and apply—key concepts.

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
08/22/2012
Biology, Animal Structure and Function, Animal Nutrition and the Digestive System, Nutrition and Energy Production
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CC BY-NC
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By the end of this section, you will be able to:Explain why an animal’s diet should be balanced and meet the needs of the bodyDefine the primary components of foodDescribe the essential nutrients required for cellular function that cannot be synthesized by the animal bodyExplain how energy is produced through diet and digestionDescribe how excess carbohydrates and energy are stored in the body

Subject:
Applied Science
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Module
Date Added:
07/10/2017
Blood pressure monitoring in obese patients
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This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"What’s the best way to measure blood pressure in surgical patients with obesity? While oscillometry using blood-pressure cuffs is the standard, in patients with obesity, these may not fit well. And oscillometry only provides intermittent information. Arterial catheters provide continuous monitoring but are invasive and can cause complications. One alternative is using a non-invasive, continuous finger cuff method. But little is known about how these various methods compare in obese patients. A new prospective study published in the journal _Anesthesiology_ has found that in patients undergoing bariatric surgery, there was better agreement between intraarterial measurement and the finger cuff than with standard cuffs for mean arterial pressure and diastolic blood pressure. And with standard cuffs, forearm measurements were superior to those on the upper arm or lower leg..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Applied Science
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
02/26/2021
Bridging gaps in obesity perception and obesity care
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This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"New findings from the ACTIONI-O study suggest that when it comes to tackling weight loss, people with obesity and healthcare professionals don’t always see eye to eye. Reported misconceptions about the factors contributing to obesity and about patient attitudes suggest much room for improving communication and education. In what’s considered the largest study of its type, researchers surveyed more than 14500 people with obesity and more than 2700 healthcare professionals treating patients with obesity in 11 countries. Surveys designed foreach group asked about perceived attitudes, behaviors, and barriers to effective obesity care. For example, patients were asked whether they consider their weight loss completely their responsibility. While clinicians were asked, among other things, to rank criteria they consider in determining whether to spark a discussion with a patient about obesity, such as patient weight, BMI, or mental state..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Applied Science
Biology
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
09/23/2019
Butyrate normalizes metabolism in mouse model of post-menopausal metabolic syndrome
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This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"Metabolic syndrome refers to dysregulated metabolism that’s associated with increased risks of diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. In women, this syndrome becomes more in common after menopause, when levels of circulating 17β-estradiol drop. Estrogen replacement therapy can help, but its long-term use is linked to other problems, like gynecological cancers. To explore new options, researchers recently administered butyrate, a fatty acid, to mice with metabolic syndrome whose ovaries had been removed, as butyrate has been shown to alleviate obesity and insulin resistance, both of which are linked to metabolic syndrome. The researchers found that oral butyrate reduced body fat and blood lipid levels in the mice while increasing whole-body energy usage and improving insulin sensitivity. Investigation of the mechanism in cultured muscle cells revealed that butyrate induced expression of the estrogen receptor ERα and activated the proteins AMPK and PGC1α..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
05/08/2023
Community interventions in obesity-related chronic diseases
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CC BY
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The rate of obesity continues to climb in the United States in all age groups. National reports, including the Trust for America’s Health annual report State of Obesity: Better Policies for a Healthier America, highlight key findings and policy recommendations. The need to continue to work towards stabilization of the obesity epidemic could not be more important as consequences of this chronic disease can be dire, potentially affecting physical health with an increase in risk for chronic diseases including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and several types of cancer as well as potentially affecting behavioral health. Curbing the high rates of obesity is particularly of importance when considering the prevalence of childhood obesity, which is on the rise not only in the United States but is also increasing globally. Although there are certain risk factors such as genetics that are not modifiable in this group, there are many dietary, physical activity and environmental factors that are modifiable through lifestyle changes. This course will explore ways to address these lifestyle changes for children through adults with both federally- and NGO- based community interventions that are working towards combating overweight and obesity and how they aim to do so with a health equity lens in mind.

Subject:
Applied Science
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Rutgers University
Author:
Christine Zellers
Karen Ensle
Sara A. Elnakib
Sherri M. Cirignano
Date Added:
02/01/2024
Corn bran fiber modulates gut microbiota in individuals with overweight and obesity
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This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"Increasing evidence links dietary fiber consumption to a reduced incidence of obesity-related diseases, including diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. That’s especially true of fermentable fibers like arabinoxylan, which is derived from whole grains and cereals like corn and stimulates the growth of beneficial gut bacteria. But in clinical studies, the benefits appear to vary between individuals. To understand what drives that variability, researchers recently tested the effects of arabinoxylan versus microcrystalline cellulose (a non-fermentable fiber control) on the communities of microbes colonizing the guts of 31 adults with overweight and obesity. Over 6 weeks, arabinoxylan significantly altered the makeup of the fecal bacteria community and increased fecal concentrations of propionate, a short chain fatty acid linked to beneficial effects on metabolism and the immune system..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
11/11/2020
Diabetes - A Global Challenge - Novel Approaches in Drug Development Part 2 (13:10)
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This presentation provides an overview of the existing treatment available for treatment of obesity. Genetic studies have revealed that the genes contributing to development of obesity is mainly located in the brain, therefore it would be logical to tro to target the brain when pursuing drugs for the treatment of obesity. However it’s not that simple.

Course responsible: Associate Professor Signe Sørensen Torekov, MD Nicolai Wewer Albrechtsen & Professor Jens Juul Holst

Subject:
Applied Science
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Copenhagen Department of Biomedical Science
Provider Set:
Diabetes - A Global Challenge
Author:
Professor Birgitte Holst
Date Added:
01/07/2015
Diabetes - A Global Challenge - Physical Activity and its Influence on Obesity, Insulin Resistance and Diabetes Part 1 (13:13)
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CC BY-NC-ND
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This presentation focus’ on the health benefits of being physically active and describes how physical training affects energy balance and metabolic health. Furthermore we’ll discuss the potential of physical training in prevention and treatment of obesity and diabetes and finally we’ll demonstrate methods that can be used to evaluate physical fitness, body fat distribution and insulin sensitivity.

Course responsible: Associate Professor Signe Sørensen Torekov, MD Nicolai Wewer Albrechtsen & Professor Jens Juul Holst

Subject:
Applied Science
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Copenhagen Department of Biomedical Science
Provider Set:
Diabetes - A Global Challenge
Author:
Professor Bente Stallknecht
Date Added:
01/07/2014
Diabetes - A Global Challenge - The Relation Between Obesity and Diabetes (15:06)
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CC BY-NC-ND
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In this presentation we’ll take a closer look at the relation between obesity and diabetes. Although it may seem simple, there are various aspects that make the relation between obesity and diabetes, more complex than at first sight.

Course responsible: Associate Professor Signe Sørensen Torekov, MD Nicolai Wewer Albrechtsen & Professor Jens Juul Holst

Subject:
Applied Science
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Copenhagen Department of Biomedical Science
Provider Set:
Diabetes - A Global Challenge
Author:
Professor Thorkild Sørensen
Date Added:
01/07/2014
Diabetes - A Global Challenge - The Role of Inflammation in Type 2 Diabetes (14:12)
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In this lecture we’ll discuss the role of inflammation in type 2 diabetes. In patients with type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular complications are of particular interest, as these are mainly responsible for the increase of mortality and obesity in diabetic patients compared with healthy subjects. In continuation of this and in order to understand why diabetes is an inflammatory disease, we’ll provide an introduction to the acute phase response.

Course responsible: Associate Professor Signe Sørensen Torekov, MD Nicolai Wewer Albrechtsen & Professor Jens Juul Holst

Subject:
Applied Science
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Copenhagen Department of Biomedical Science
Provider Set:
Diabetes - A Global Challenge
Author:
Professor Bente Klarlund Pedersen
Date Added:
01/07/2016
Diabetes - The Essential Facts - Can we Cure Diabetes ? (17:02)
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CC BY-NC-ND
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This presentation focus on the question: can we cure diabetes? By interviewing different experts we will estimate how possible it is that we will find a cure for diabetes in the future. One of the main arguments is that we already have a cure, which is eating right and exercise, but the big question is whether people are willing to take this cure?

Narrator: Richard Steed.

Subject:
Applied Science
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Copenhagen Department of Biomedical Science
Provider Set:
Diabetes - The Essential Facts
Author:
Associate Professor Signe Sørensen Torekov
MD Nicolai Wewer Albrechtsen
Professor Jens Juul Holst
Professor Juleen Zierath
Professor Torben Hansen
Date Added:
01/07/2016
Diabetes - The Essential Facts - What Role Does Nutrition Play ? (15:25)
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CC BY-NC-ND
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This presentation focus on which role nutrition plays in developing diabetes and how obesity affects diabetes development. Obesity and weight gain dramatically increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. But it’s not only the total calorie intake and the BMI that counts, so does the distribution between fat, protein and carbohydrates, in other words the composition of nutritions. In continuation of this it will be discussed how a restricting intake of carbohydrates might be the way to reduce or even eliminate the use of medication in diabetes treatments.

Narrator: Richard Steed.

Subject:
Applied Science
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Copenhagen Department of Biomedical Science
Provider Set:
Diabetes - The Essential Facts
Author:
Associate Professor Signe Sørensen Torekov
MD Nicolai Wewer Albrechtsen
Professor Arne Astrup
Professor Jens Juul Holst
Professor Venkat Narayan
Date Added:
01/07/2016
Diabetes - The Essential Facts - What Role Does Overweight and Obesity Play ? (17:27)
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CC BY-NC-ND
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This presentation address how being overweight and obese is considered one of the strongest predictors, regarding the development of type 2 diabetes. Almost 85 % of people living with diabetes type 2, are either overweight or obese. This is an important aspect, because globally we have a lot of overweight people, in fact in 2014, one in three adults was overweight and one in eight was obese. But why do the numbers keep growing and what’s causing this epidemic growth of obesity?

Narrator: Richard Steed.

Subject:
Applied Science
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Copenhagen Department of Biomedical Science
Provider Set:
Diabetes - The Essential Facts
Author:
Associate Professor Signe Sørensen Torekov
MD Nicolai Wewer Albrechtsen
Professor Arne Astrup
Professor Jens Juul Holst
Professor Steven Bloom
Date Added:
01/07/2016
Diet, obesity, and gut microbes: determinants of metabolic outcomes in non-human primates
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CC BY
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This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"The composition of the gut microbiome is affected by diet as well as obesity, which can itself be diet-related, but the comparative influences of these factors are unclear. To explore the complex interactions among diet, obesity, and gut microbes, researchers examined female monkeys fed either a Western or Mediterranean diet. Metagenomic sequencing of fecal samples revealed that diet was the main contributor to gut bacterial diversity. Compared with the Western diet group, the Mediterranean diet group had greater overall diversity and different abundance of 54 bacterial species. Within each diet group, leaner and heavier monkeys also had subtly different microbiomes. Interestingly, the Western diet-fed group had more Prevotella copri and had high-P. copri and low-P. copri subgroups. High-P. copri monkeys had lower diversity than low-P. copri monkeys and different proportions of some microbes. Untargeted metabolomics of urine and plasma also suggested that the high-P..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Nutrition
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
10/16/2021
Eating with your eyes: Using portion control plates to reduce self-selected food portion sizes
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CC BY
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This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"Looking at these two figures, does one of the solid black circles appear larger than the other? What about these apples? If the apple or the circle on the right looks bigger, your eyes have been fooled by an optical illusion. One that may help fight obesity. Inspired by these illusions, researchers have recently developed a portion-control plate as a means to promote smaller meal sizes. A new study published in the journal, BMC Obesity, evaluates the success of this plate. The World Heath Organization has officially declared obesity to be a global epidemic, with 38% of women and nearly as many men affected world-wide. An important reason for this is an increase in energy intake without the corresponding energy expenditure, and large portion sizes have been implicated as a key player in creating this imbalance. Unfortunately, many people find it a difficult task to learn healthy portion sizes and consistently consume the proper amount of food for every meal..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Applied Science
Biology
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
02/25/2021