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Addressing Short- and Long-Term Risks to Water Supply
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Public Domain
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In 2012, water managers in Fredericktown, Missouri, saw their city's main source of water dwindle. They used the EPA’s Climate Ready Water Utilities program to consider options and develop plans to protect their water source.

Subject:
Hydrology
Physical Science
Material Type:
Case Study
Provider:
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Provider Set:
U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit
Date Added:
08/29/2016
Comprehensive OER Initiative Toolkit for Educators and Managers
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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The Comprehensive OER Toolkit has been thoughtfully designed to empower educators and managers with the essential tools and guidance needed to effectively initiate, implement, and manage Open Educational Resources (OER) projects within their educational institutions. These resources have been carefully curated to facilitate a seamless workflow and streamline the processes associated with OER adoption.By offering this diverse array of resources, the Comprehensive OER Toolkit aims to equip educators and managers with a comprehensive suite of materials and templates to effectively manage the entire lifecycle of OER projects, from their inception to evaluation. Whether you are a novice or an experienced OER advocate, these resources can be customized and adapted to meet the specific needs of your institution, ultimately fostering a culture of open education and enhancing access to quality learning materials for all students.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Full Course
Author:
Linda Neff
Date Added:
09/08/2023
Conservation Biology in Sub-Saharan Africa
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Conservation Biology in Sub-Saharan Africa comprehensively explores the challenges and potential solutions to key conservation issues in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Easy to read, this lucid and accessible textbook includes fifteen chapters that cover a full range of conservation topics, including threats to biodiversity, environmental laws, and protected areas management, as well as related topics such as sustainability, poverty, and human-wildlife conflict. This rich resource also includes a background discussion of what conservation biology is, a wide range of theoretical approaches to the subject, and concrete examples of conservation practice in specific African contexts. Strategies are outlined to protect biodiversity whilst promoting economic development in the region.

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Open Book Publishers
Author:
John W. Wilson
Richard B. Primack
Date Added:
09/16/2019
Ecological Footprint
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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Students learn about the concepts of the tragedy of the commons and sustainability in the Course Introduction. Project 1 builds on these concepts by having students analyze their family’s ecological footprint using data they collect by auditing their use of various resources. Students then propose how they their family live more sustainably. Part of Sprocket's AP environmental science course.

Subject:
Applied Science
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Lucas Education Research
Provider Set:
Sprocket
Date Added:
09/04/2019
The Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipelines: Reconciling Interests
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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Drawing from a case study of the Northern Gateway (Enbridge) pipeline project we consider if it is possible to reconcile or mediate the conflicting objectives and goals of the resource proponent and the First Nations whose lands the pipeline will traverse. We will draw from the existing legal precedents and a consideration of approaches taken to such disputes in similar settings in other settler-colonial societies such as New Zealand and Australia. In considering the efficacy of Canadian legal measures we need to consider the place and role of Indigenous laws and if they are given sufficient weight in disputes such as this.

Subject:
Applied Science
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Case Study
Provider:
University of British Columbia
Provider Set:
Open Case Studies
Date Added:
12/07/2016
How Will Fish Fare in the Future? Assessing Vulnerability Across an Ecosystem
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As the Atlantic Ocean warms, many marine species—including commercially important fish stocks—are moving further north along the Northeast United States. As a consequence, fishing boats based in traditional ports need to travel further to catch the same fish, or change their strategy to pursue different species of fish. In turn, businesses that serve fishing communities may need to purchase new equipment, develop new practices, or encourage workers to gain new skills. In order for fisheries and the businesses that depend on them to prepare for such changes, fisheries managers need tools to identify which fishery resources may be most vulnerable to our changing climate.

Subject:
Atmospheric Science
Physical Science
Material Type:
Case Study
Provider:
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Provider Set:
U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit
Date Added:
09/22/2016
Incorporating Climate Change Into a New Forest Management Plan
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Facing sea level rise, increasing numbers of wildfires, and encroachment of invasive species, managers of a national forest chose to integrate climate change into their new plan.

Subject:
Applied Science
Material Type:
Case Study
Provider:
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Provider Set:
U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit
Date Added:
08/09/2016
Ińupiaq Work to Preserve Food and Traditions on Alaska's North Slope
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Residents of North Slope Borough, Alaska, look to solar-powered ice cellars and other strategies to preserve their traditional whaling lifestyle.

Subject:
Applied Science
Material Type:
Case Study
Provider:
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Provider Set:
U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit
Date Added:
08/09/2016
Marine biology: The Deep Ocean
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
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TED Studies, created in collaboration with Wiley, are curated video collections — supplemented by rich educational materials — for students, educators and self-guided learners. In The Deep Ocean, aquatic explorers take the TED stage to share what they've seen in the abyss of Earth's last frontier: the deep ocean, home to massive underwater mountains and valleys, giant smoking chimneys and an amazing array of animals.

Subject:
Oceanography
Physical Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
TED
Provider Set:
TED Studies
Author:
Alex Rogers
Date Added:
01/06/2017
Protecting Fish to Save Coral Reefs
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Coral reefs off the west coast of Maui are readily accessible and heavily used by visitors and locals alike. Managers needed a plan to boost the resilience of the reefs so they could continue providing critical habitat for marine species.

Subject:
Atmospheric Science
Physical Science
Material Type:
Case Study
Provider:
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Provider Set:
U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit
Date Added:
08/11/2016
Science: Natural Resource Management: Historical and Contemporary
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CC BY-NC-ND
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This lesson examines tribal stewardship of natural resources and the concept of a federal trust relationship between tribes and the U.S. government. More than a century of federal policy denied tribes the rights to control and manage the lands that were set aside for them as part of treaty negotiations. These lands are legally owned by tribes and Native American individuals but are held in trust by the U.S. government. In recent decades, tribes have fought and won many legal battles to establish the right to manage the natural resources on tribal land, as well as the right to hunt, fish, and use those resources in accordance with their traditions. Today, tribal agencies frequently collaborate with both state and federal government agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the U.S. Forest Service, to manage and protect the land.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Author:
Aujalee Moore
April Campbell
Date Added:
07/28/2023
Technologies for Sustainability Systems
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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EME 807 overviews a wide range of contemporary technologies in the context of sustainability and examines metrics for their assessment. The course explores the main principles that guide modern science and technology towards sustainable solutions. It covers such topics as resource management technologies, waste and wastewater treatment, renewable energy technologies, high performance buildings and transportation systems, application of informatics and feedback to sustainable systems, and more. Learning in EME 807 heavily relies on real-life examples and taps into current practices of technology analysis. This course goes beyond understanding the background, fostering critical thinking and challenging the students to draw connections between social, environmental, and economic aspects of sustainable technologies.

Subject:
Applied Science
Career and Technical Education
Cultural Geography
Ecology
Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Geology
Life Science
Physical Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State College of Earth and Mineral Sciences
Author:
Mark Fedkin
Date Added:
10/07/2019
To Fish or Not to Fish?
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This role-playing activity is based on the Marine Reserves process at the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary and explores the complex decision-making process for establishing marine protected areas and resolving resource management issues.

Subject:
Oceanography
Physical Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
PBS
Provider Set:
Jean Michel Costeau: Ocean Adventures
Author:
Satie Airame
Date Added:
07/16/2012
Tulalip Tribes: Saving Their Sacred Salmon
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Terry Williams is blunt when he describes the environmental crisis tribes in the Pacific Northwest are facing: "We’ve lost 90 percent of the salmon population."

As the Tulalip Tribe’s Fisheries and Natural Resources Commissioner, Williams has witnessed the decline of salmon and its impacts on tribal members. For the Tulalip and other tribes in the region, the population crash of salmon is much more than an assault on their economic lifeblood—it is a cultural and spiritual threat to their identity as a people.

The annual springtime Salmon Ceremony puts tribal members in direct touch with their ancestors, and other ceremonies and practices center on the fish through the year. Losing the fish is a strike to the core of the Tulalip people, but they have a long-term vision to restore wild salmon populations to levels that will support their fishing needs.

Subject:
Applied Science
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Case Study
Provider:
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Provider Set:
U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit
Date Added:
08/09/2016