Author:
Lesley James, Lesley James
Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Lesson, Unit of Study
Level:
Middle School, High School
Tags:
  • media literacy
  • media-literacy
  • wa-dcml
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike
    Language:
    English

    Media Literacy Explainers: Perspectives & Bias

    Media Literacy Explainers: Perspectives & Bias

    Overview

    These three self-paced resources were created using Sway (a combination slide deck / infographic / comic format) for older middle school/younger high school students. They explain the concepts of perspectives and bias in a media literacy context and with a specific approach: 1) that everyone has perspectives, but not all perspectives are biased and 2) that in some circumstances it's OK to get information from sources created by people with a strong perspective on the topic. 

    Explainers

    What are perspectives and where do they come from?

    Students can view this Sway (or this Google doc) as an introduction to:

    • Definitions of “interpretation” and “perspective”

    • Examples of people interpreting the same thing through different perspectives

    • What shapes our perspectives as we experience the world

     

    What’s the difference between perspective & bias–and where does bias come from?

    Students can view this Sway (or this Google doc) as an introduction to:

    • Distinctions between “perspective” and “bias”

    • Examples of perspectives at different points on a spectrum from less biased to more biased

    • Some of the things that push a perspective towards the more-biased end of the spectrum

    • Why it matters if some people have more-biased perspectives

     

    What to do about perspectives & bias in information sources

    Students can view this Sway (or this Google doc) as an introduction to:

    • How to identify perspectives when you’re consuming information

    • When it’s OK to use an information source created by people with a particular perspective

    • How to identify perspectives from the more-biased end of the spectrum when you’re consuming information

    There’s a check-for-understanding challenge at the end. Here’s the Answer Key.

     

    Cover image credit: "Roller coaster silhouette" | CC0