Author:
Shawn Sheller, Barbara Soots, Kimberlee Swan, Julie Cantrell, Jill Minkiewitz, Mark Friden, Kirsten Lewandowski
Subject:
Marketing, English Language Arts, Nutrition
Material Type:
Activity/Lab, Game, Lesson, Module, Unit of Study
Level:
Upper Primary
Grade:
3, 4
Tags:
  • 3rd grade
  • 3rd-grade
  • 4th grade
  • 4th-grade
  • Health
  • Influence
  • Media/advertisement
  • Nutrition
  • Physical Education
  • high school
  • high-school
  • influence
  • media literacy
  • media-literacy
  • middle school
  • middle-school
  • propaganda
  • wa-edtech
  • wa-hpe
  • License:
    Creative Commons Attribution
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Downloadable docs, Text/HTML

    Education Standards

    Don't Be Fooled By Food Messaging!

    Don't Be Fooled By Food Messaging!

    Overview

     Description: Don’t be fooled by food messaging is a media literacy embedded health unit that takes the health goals of maintaining a healthy lifestyle and adds some critical thinking skills and communication skills. In food marketing young people are surrounded by persuasive claims meant to influence and manipulate their eating behavior. Students will explore some of the techniques and strategies food marketers use to influence their eating behavior to better understand how it impacts their own food choices. 
    Within the PE program students will discuss how food choices, levels of consumption and physical activity levels influence health and wellness. Body image/healthy weight will be incorporated into this content. The culminating projects require students to work collaboratively to synthesize their new learning while using a variety of strategies to create their own healthy choices messaging production projects
    .

    Don't Be Fooled by Food Messaging Unit

    Introduction

    Don’t be fooled by food messaging is a media literacy embedded health unit that introduces nutrition concepts so that students can create health goals for maintaining a healthy lifestyle. It  incorporates some critical thinking skills and communication skills. It has some game-based instructional strategies that reinforce how to read nutrition fact labels to make healthier food choices. Students culminate their learning by synthesizing their new learning to produce their own media messages around food.

    In food marketing young people are surrounded by persuasive claims meant to influence and manipulate their eating behavior. Students will learn about nutrition, MyPlate and making healthier food choices. They will learn how to read and analyze food labels. Students will explore some of the techniques and strategies food marketers use to influence their eating behavior to better understand how these propoganda and marketing techniques impact their own food choices.

    Within the PE program students will use a food diary to track daily food, drink and activity choices. This food diary will be used to discuss how food choices, levels of consumption and physical activity levels influence health and wellness. There are opportunities to incorporate hands-on, physical activities that help students understand the meaning of calories, and that some calories are better than others. Over the course of the unit, student understanding of healthy lifestyle and food marketing will increase, helping them to critically evaluate food and drink items, leading to better resistance skills when making dietary selections.

    The teacher-librarian introduces the media literacy concepts that are in this unit. By asking students to analyze the Branding Alphabet and to keep media logs, student awareness of the 24/7 nature of marketing and media and the impact it has on them is highlighted. Throughout the unit there are additional opportunites to collabrated with the team of teachers to highlight other propoganda strategies or content relevant to the unit.

    The culminating projects require students to work collaboratively to synthesize their new learning while using a variety of strategies to create their own healthy choice messaging production projects. One of the suggested extensions includes hosting a food fair of healthy food items.

    Lessons

    Lesson 1- Media Literacy: Do You Know Your ABC’s?

    Lesson 2: Food Diary

    Lesson 3: Six Nutrients Your Body Needs

    Lesson 4: Food Groups

    Lesson 5: Dietary Guidelines

    Lesson 6: Food label Literacy

    Lesson 7: What Influences Your Food Choices?

    Lesson 8: Media Influences and Propaganda

    Lesson 9: Culminating Project: Create Your Own Ad

    Development Team

    Soos Creek Elementary School, Kent School District, Washington

    • Julie Cantrell
    • Mark Friden
    • Kirsten Lewandowski
    • Jill Minkiewitz
    • Shawn Sheller
    • Kimberlee Swan
       

    Attribution and License

    Attribution

    American Alphabet copyright Heidi Cody. All rights reserved. Used pursuant to fair use.

    FoodMania: Kids and Food in a Marketing Driven World by Marilyn Cohen, PhD, et al., copyright University of Washington, NW Center for Excellence in Media Literacy. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

    Powerful Choices: Powerful Kids, The Media's Calling: What Will You Do? By Marilyn Cohen, PhD, et all., copyright University of Washington, NW Center for Excellence in Media Literacy. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

    Choose My Plate by U.S. Department of Agriculture | public domain

    Washington Health and Physical Education Learning Standards by Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction | CC BY

    Egg photo by annca from Pixabay 

    Images without specific attribution are in the public domain or openly licensed and were obtained from Pixabay or Google Images (labeled for reuse).

     

    This resource was made possible by funding from the Washington State Legislature and administered through the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction.

    License

    CC BY logo

    Except where otherwise noted, Don’t Be Fooled by Food Messaging by Soos Creek Elementary for Kent School District is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. All logos and trademarks are property of their respective owners. Sections used under fair use doctrine (17 U.S.C. § 107) are marked.

    This resource may contain links to websites operated by third parties. These links are provided for your convenience only and do not constitute or imply any endorsement or monitoring by Kent School District.

    Alternate material licenses with different levels of user permission are clearly indicated next to the specific content in the materials. These sections do not fall under Kent School District’s open license.

    If this work is adapted, note the substantive changes and re-title, removing any Kent School District logos and content used here with permission. Provide the following attribution:

    This resource was adapted from original materials provided by Kent School District. Original materials may be freely accessed Washington OER Hub

    Lesson 1: Media Literacy - Do You Know Your ABC’s?

    The ad media tracker is meant to help students develop an awareness of the thousands of ads that surround them every day.

    It may be modified as the unit progresses to reinforce specific aspects of marketing, or to look more closely at food advertising.

    As the unit goes on, you may decide to ask students to use the Noticings column to "notice" propaganda techniques, what media influences they encountered, and such things as target audience or the Slogan/Jingle/Characters that are used to influence your choices.

    By asking students to develop an awareness of these attributes of effective marketing throughout the unit, when they are asked to create their own food messages during the culminating lesson(s), they will have a better conceptual understanding of the project and will be better able to apply the new learning to synthesize and create their own advertising.

    It is encouraged that while students are participating in this unit, the library media program continue to reinforce the classroom learnings around media and food messaging. By discussing the media tracker regularly students begin to analyze the messages they are viewing. Selecting and sharing examples of propoganda techniques, slogans/jingles and characters will help students to identify advertising that is directed toward children. By viewing and analyzing some examples together, the library media center will ensure that all students benefit from thinking more deeply about advertising, even those who didn't complete the homework/media log entries. 

    Incorporating the use of product placement is another extension that can support this unit's goals of students becoming more aware of the marketing that is directed at them. The ultimate goal of this series of lessons is for students to develop resistance skills through increased awareness and critical thinking.

    *According to Forbes article, "Finding Success in the Digital World" written by Jon Simpson and published on August 25, 2017, digital marketing experts estimate that most Americans are exposed to 4,000 to 10,000 ads each day!

    TARGET AUDIENCE LESSON SUPPORT FOR LESSON 9

    I have added three sets of ads that can be looked at to determine the traget audience.

    I would suggest leading the class through some of the ads using the prompts below.
    Then, let students partner up, or work in small groups,  and discuss. To close this learning activity, come together and share out. Be sure to reinforce accurate observations or creative responses.

    Asking questions such as:

    • Can you infer who this ad is targeting?
    • What are some identifiers, what do you notice, that leads you to make this conclusion?
    • Are they effective? Why do you think this?
    • Extension: If you wanted to change the target audience, what are some changes you might make to these ads?

     

     

    Lesson 1: Do You Know Your ABC’s?

    Overview

    Learning Targets

    • I can become aware of media’s 24/7 presence.
    • Using American Alphabet, I can name as many brands that are associated with the logos or trademarks of these products.
    • Using my creativity, I can change American Alphabet, using the logos and trademarks of other products.
    • I can build my awareness of the 24/7 nature of media messaging by paying attention to it. I will write it down on my media tracker. I will infer the purpose or audience when I can.

    Grades

    • 3rd and 4th grade

    Duration 

    • 30 to 45 minutes

    Standards and Learning Objectives 

    • Standards: H2.N6.3 Identify how peers, media, and technology influence food and beverage choices and well as eating behaviors.
    • ITSE standard 1c  Students use technology to seek feedback that informs and improves their practice and to demonstrate their learning in a variety of ways.

    Materials/Resources

    • Do You Know Your ABCs (ppt)
    • American Alphabet Placards for students (one for each pair or small group)
    • American Alphabet Student Handout- identifying the logos and trademarks
    • Answer Key for American Alphabet Student Handout

    Before Starting the Lesson

    • Make a copy of the media tracker handout for each student.
    • Make a copy of the Do You Know Your ABCs slides so you can edit as needed.
    • Provide a copy of the American Alphabet student handouts for group use: one placard and one handout for each group (2-4 students).
      • You can also distribute a digital copy and give students appropriate editing rights so they can complete it in a digital format.
      • Students can use a digital platform (Google/Microsoft), as an alternative for them to create their own branding alphabets digitally.

    Extensions:

    • Can You Make Your Own American Alphabet Student Handout- brainstorming other appropriate logos and trademarks for the alphabet

    Procedure

    Activity 1, Slide 5: Do You Know Your ABCs

    • Students will receive a copy of the American Alphabet and a handout to write the company or product name for the corresponding logo or trademark. I suggest doing this in small groups of 2-4.
      • Note: The American Alphabet used in this activity has inspired others. Feel free to utilize these alternative resources and/or encourage students to explore on their own.

    Activity 2, Slide 9: Can You Make Your ABCs

    • This activity encourages small group discussion about the topic of brands logos and their experiences with them. It also allows them to consider various alternative logos or trademarks for products other than those presented in the American Alphabet.

    Activity 3, Slide 11: Tracking Media Awareness

    • This activity is designed to build student awareness of the 24/7 nature of media messaging by paying attention to it. Students are instructed to write down or track this on the handout:  My Media Tracker, including the purpose or audience when possible.

    Attribution

    American Alphabet copyright Heidi Cody. All rights reserved. Used pursuant to fair use.

    Do You Know Your ABCs (ppt) by Kent School District | CC BY NC SA

    Powerful Choices: Powerful Kids, The Media's Calling: What Will You Do? By Marilyn Cohen, PhD, et all., copyright University of Washington, NW Center for Excellence in Media Literacy. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

    Images without specific attribution are in the public domain or openly licensed and were obtained from Pixabay or Google Images (labeled for reuse).

    Lesson 2: Food Diary

    By creating short activities in PE that show the impact that food choices can have on our health, it connects the very important fact that activity levels influence our health too.

    Define calories and remind students that not all calories are alike. 

    Compare nutritional value of a serving of red licorice and a serving of a fruity yogurt. Even though the calories are equal, the nutritional value is very different (Use the food label information to help students understand the meaning of "EMPTY CALORIES"). 

    FOOTBALL FIELD GUESSING GAME
    As students enter PE offer them each some M&Ms.
    Notice how many you took and enjoy them.
    Before class, measure out 100 feet of distance and ask students to count the number of steps it takes them to walk it, three times (the equivalent of a football field). Ask students how many M&M's they thought they worked off while walking... (the correct answer is, 1 M&M = walking the length of a football field). So, if there about 20 pieces in a 3 ounce bag, that works out to 20 pieces x 300 feet = 6000 feet. There are 5280 feet in a mile.  You will have to walk over a mile (1.14 to be exact) to work off the empty calories in this package.
    *Remind students that empty calories provide energy but very little, if any, nutritional value.

    Other examples: How many football fields would you have to walk to work off the calories for each of the food items listed below.

    12 ounce can of Cola = 28 football fields
    1 burger, fries and shake = 240 football fields
    1 Snickers bar = 52 football fields
    20 potato chips = 40 football fields
    1 huge glass of water = 0 football fields

    In Closing ask students to brainstorm other ways to get exercise after school? Include inside and outside activities. 

    Optional: Consider spotlighting sugar consumption is sugary drinks and its health effects while positively reinforcing the drinking of water for our hydration needs. 

    There are game cards that can be printed or used digitally in a presentation as a whole group activity. NOTE: This PDF is laid out for back-to-back printing of the items in it. Editing is not recommended.

    Also included is "Sugar Drinks- time it takes to eat a pound of sugar. This graphic shows that it only tastes 7 days to consume 1 pound of sugar if you drink 1 20 oz. sugary drink a day. This adds up to a potential weight gain of 5 to 15 pounds over the course of a year.

    Optional: Have students take the energy drink and soda challenge

    Food Choice/exercise optional activities: There are a lot of calories and hidden sugars in the snacks and food that we eat.

     

    • A single serving of regular potato chips provides 160 calories, 10 grams of fat, 15 grams of carbohydrate, while carrots provide 30 calories, 0 grams of fat and 7 grams of carbohydrates.

    Optional challenges: Attached are 2 documents: The Fruit and Veggies Challenge, where students make a goal to eat more over a week long period of time.

    The Energy and Soda Drinks Challenge, where students make a goal to drink less over a week long period of time.

    *American Heart Assc. recommends children age 2 to 16 consume less than 6 teaspoons a day in added sugars.

     

    Lesson 2: Food Diary

    Overview

    In this lesson students will learn to record their daily food and water intake as well as their activity levels.  Students will be introduced to and shown how to collect data in the diary.  The data collected with the diary will be a part of Lesson 2 (Activity 2) and can also be used as a reflection for lessons 1-4. 

    Grade

    • 3rd and 4th Grade 

    Duration

    • 1 day (30 to 40 minutes) 

    Standards

    • PE3.11.8 Maintain and reflect on a personal physical activity and nutrition log. (8th) 
    • PE3.8.4a Create a balance daily food plan.  (4th) 
    • H1.N4.2 Identify healthy eating patterns that provide energy and help the body grow. (2nd) 
    • H7.N6.8 Assess personal food and beverage intake based on recommendations.  (8th) 

    Learning Objectives

    • Students will be able to record daily food, drink, and activity choices. (I can record my daily food and activity choices.) 
    • Students can use the knowledge from the data collected to make changes toward better nutrition and activity. (I can use what I learned to make better choices) 

    Formative Assessment 

    • Check-ins and visual inspection of logs. 

    Materials

    • Food Diary booklet for each student 
    • Food Diary PowerPoint
    • Single copy Enlarged Food Diary Page 
    • Parent letter to send home with each student

    Background

    • Personal experiences 

    Procedure

    • Introduce the learning target.
    • Begin instruction with the Food Diary PowerPoint.

    Activity #1: Diary Introduction 

    • Give each student a Food Diary Booklet and have the put their name and homeroom teacher’s name on it.
    • Open to the first inside page with instructions and review showing them the different pages (logging, drawing, and questions).  Be sure to have them wait to fill out the last page until.

    • Activity #2: Diary Check-ins

    • Open to the current day (you may change the order of days before printing so the first day matches the day you will be starting) 
    • Demonstrate how to fill out breakfast for that day listing all foods and estimated amounts, if desired.  You may use your breakfast, an imaginary one, or a student’s. 
    • After each meal or snack, have them color in a star for each serving of the food groups at the top of the page. You may alternately have them do this with the food groups lesson. 
      • Show them how to fill in a star for each glass of water they have and at the bottom of each day they fill in any exercise and duration. You may have them fill this in after PE or recess to help them. 
    • There are pages at the back to draw favorite activities, individual and group.  These can be used to demonstrate that you can be active even by yourself. 
    • Be sure to monitor how students are filling out the Diary throughout the Unit, with check-ins at the beginning of PE.  If needed, schedule check in times or/and ask other students to pair/share. Provide discussion prompts to see if by tracking their food, water and excercise habits they are having an emotional response (surprised, confused, informed,...) any behavioral responses (has anything changed in your choices now that you are more aware of how these behaviors effect how healthy you are).

    Activity #2: Diary Reflection 

    • Once students have completed filling out the diary you can lead a reflection on what they see using the questions on the back of the diary. 
    •  Look for differences from day to day in food group completion, exercise amounts, and water consumption.  Have students turn and talk about why there were differences. 
    •  Point out there may have been some days they were short in one food group, but they probably made it up later or earlier in the week. 
    • Foster a long-term view instead of nit-picking a must have each food group filled out each day. 
    • Have students turn to the back of the diary where the questions are and guide them through answering them.  Have students share out, or turn to different people and share/compare each section. 
    • Things I Knew:  A listing of knowledge they came in with that they used in filling out the diary. 
    • Surprises:  Ah-ha moments, things they learned that especially resonated. 
    • Things I learned:  General information and ideas learned, not Ah-has. 
    • Something to tell family:  An idea, goal, or plan that the student can share with their family to help with better food choices.   
    • The point of this being that often 3rd and 4th graders do not generally get much choice on the food that is presented to them at home.  Sometimes the parent’s choice is less than ideal, and hopefully the student can be a voice in affecting a change for the better.

    Attribution

    Images without specific attribution are in the public domain or openly licensed and were obtained from Pixabay or Google Images (labeled for reuse).

    Powerful Choices: Powerful Kids, The Media's Calling: What Will You Do? By Marilyn Cohen, PhD, et all., copyright University of Washington, NW Center for Excellence in Media Literacy. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

     

    Lesson 3: Six Nutrients Your Body Needs

    Overview  

    This lesson covers the 6 nutrients and how each nutrient provides energy for our body. 

    Grade

    • 3rd and 4th Grade 

    Duration

    • 2 days (30-40 minutes each day) 

    Standards

    • H1.N1.3b: Define nutrient 
    • H1.N1.3c: List six nutrients: carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, minerals, water 
    • H1.N1.4b: Classify nutrients found in foods. 
    • H1.N1.4c: Describe how each nutrient contributes to a healthy body.  

    Learning Objectives

    • Students will be able to identify the six essential nutrients. (I can name six essential nutrients my body needs. I can identify nutrients found in specific foods.) 
    • Students will be able to identify the nutrients that repair the body, promote growth and provide energy. (I can tell the job of each nutrient.) 

    Formative Assessment

    • Nutrient Identification game 
    • You may want to use this question as a reflection in a discussion, an exit ticket or as a survey or a Flipgrid (flipgrid.com). 
      • Carbohydrates are good for your body, but some are better than others. Identify one carbohydrate that you could eat less often and one carbohydrate you could eat more often. Extension: Explain your response.

    Materials

    • Six Nutrients Your Body Needs PowerPoint 
    • Nutrient pictures 
    • Teacher created: Six posters labeled with one nutrient each (Nutrient Identification Game) The posters should be big enough for students to see around the room. 

    Background

    • This is the initial classroom-based lesson of the unit. No background needed. 

    Procedure

    Activity #1: Introduce the Learning Objectives

    • Today we are going to learn about nutrients. 
    • Class Discussion: (KWL) What do you know about nutrients? What nutrients do you think our body gets from food? 
    • Nutrients are substances in food or drink that are used by the body for growth, energy and repair. (Carbohydrates, Proteins, Fats, Vitamins, Minerals and Water) 

    Activity #2: Class Discussion

    • Introduce poster of each nutrient. Ask students what they know about each of these nutrients before displaying the poster somewhere in the room for the following activity. 

    Activity #3: Student Activity

    • Show food item/picture and ask students to go stand by the sign for the nutrient(s) that they think the food contains. Repeat this process with a variety of food examples (formative assessment for teacher, make it fun.) This activity will be repeated at the end of the lesson). (create a table with a variety of foods for teacher to cut up and present to class) 

    Activity #4: Direct Instruction

    • Use the PowerPoint to teach the 6 main nutrients, their purpose, and their food and drink sources. The PowerPoint includes the following teaching points: 
    • Your body needs energy: 
      •  You get energy from your diet 
      •  Define nutrient (a material in a food or drink that is used by the body) 
      •  Identify 6 nutrients and food sources 
      •  Review nutrients and their purpose (repair body, provide energy, and promote growth) 

    Activity #5: Independent Practice Activity

    •  “Think, Pair, Share” slides at the end of the PowerPoint 

    Activity #6: Closure

    • Re-do student activity (from Activity #3) of standing by poster when shown a food. (Goal is for increased accuracy and for students to realize that a food may contain more than one nutrient.

    Extended Activities

    • You may want to search for free pre-made supplemental activities and content on apps such as:
      • Seesaw app.seesaw.me
      • Kahoot   kahoot.com
      • YouTube youtube.com
      • Choose My Plate    chosemyplate.gov

     

    Attribution

    Images without specific attribution are in the public domain or openly licensed and were obtained from Pixabay or Google Images (labeled for reuse).

    Lesson 4: Food Groups

    Lesson 4: Food Groups

    Overview

    Students will learn about food groups and plan meals using MyPlate.

    Grade

    • 3rd and 4th Grade

    Duration

    • 1 day (30-40 minutes)

    Standards

    • H1.N1.3a:  Create a balanced meal.
    • H6.N6.3:  Develop a healthy eating goal.

    Learning Objectives

    • Students will be able to identify the food groups in MyPlate and their recommended amounts. (I can name the 5 food groups and tell how much I need to eat from each food group.)
    • Students will be able to identify healthy ways to eat using MyPlate. (I can use MyPlate to plan a meal.)

    Formative Assessment

    • Create a balanced meal using MyPlate template (Activity #3)
    • Option: Take the quiz, a MyPlate resource can also be used to self-assess students' current dietary practices. It identifies which nutrients or food groups are needing attention and suggestions for addressing them (PPT slide is linked to this resource). 

    Materials

    • Make enough copies of blank MyPlate template for each student to have 2. Attached. Spanish version is also attached.
    •  Have students bring food diary (filled out prior to today's lesson) to class for this lesson.
    • A sample food diary filled out. Attached
    • A sample MyPlate from sample food diary enty. Attached.
    • Optional: Take the Quiz, an online resource. Attached

    Background

    • Lesson: Six Nutrients your Body Needs

    Procedure

    • Introduce the Learning Objectives:
      • To stay healthy, we need to eat healthy foods.
      • We will learn to make healthy food choices that provide all the nutrients our body needs.
      • We can categorize the foods into different groups using MyPlate.

    Activity #1: Class Discussion

    • To stay healthy, we need to eat healthy foods.
    • We will learn to make healthy food choices that provide all the nutrients our body needs.
    • We can categorize the foods into different groups using MyPlate.

    Show the video and /or song below to teach or review the food groups:

    • Video: MyPlate 5 Food Group Video by Healty Eating | YouTube
      If preferred, substitute other suitable video (10 minutes in length)
    • Song: MyPlate Song by Lori Nevling | YouTube
      If preferred, substitute other suitable video (3 minutes in length)

    Activity #2: Guided Activity

    • Hand out a blank MyPlate template. Teacher models choosing a food diary entry (breakfast, lunch, or dinner) and entering those items (by writing or drawing) into the correct section of the MyPlate template. Then have students do the same with one of their food diary entries.

    Activity #3: Independent Activity

    • Students evaluate and plan another version of the same meal (breakfast, lunch or dinner) using the MyPlate food groups and recommended servings.

    Closure Activity: Back-to-Back Protocol

    • Student directions:
      • Choose a partner and stand back-to-back.
      • Decide who will go first. (partner A and B)
      • When the teacher says, “Turn around”, face your partner. Partner A, you will share your MyPlate meal and explain why you made the food choices that you did.
      • Partner B, it’s now your turn to share your MyPlate meal and explain your choices.

    Extended Activities

    • You may want to search for free pre-made supplemental activities and content on apps such as:
      • Seesaw app.seesaw.me
      • Kahoot   kahoot.com
      • YouTube youtube.com
      • Choose My Plate    chosemyplate.gov

    Attribution

    Choose My Plate by U.S. Department of Agriculture | public domain

    Images without specific attribution are in the public domain or openly licensed and were obtained from Pixabay or Google Images (labeled for reuse).

    Lesson 5: Dietary Guidelines

    Lesson 5: Dietary Guidelines

    Day 1 Overview

    The purpose of this lesson is to help students be aware of the 5 dietary guidelines that will help students make good food choices.

    Grade

    • 3rd and 4th Grade

    Duration

    • 1 day (30 to 40 minutes)

    Standards

    • H1.N2.3 Explain importance of choosing healthy beverages.
    • H1.N2.4 Identify impact of high-sugar and high-caffeine drinks.  
    • H6.N6.3 Develop a healthy eating goal.
    • H1.N5.3b Describe benefits of limiting consumption of sodium and added sugars.  
    • H1.N5.4b Describe benefits and consequences of consuming fats.
    • H1.N5.4a Identify foods that are high in fat and low in fat.

    Learning Objectives

    • Students will be able to read and understand the dietary guidelines. (I can read and understand the dietary guidelines.)
    • Students will be able to explain how to use the dietary guidelines to choose healthy snacks. (I can use Guideline #3 to make two goals for choosing healthy snacks and beverages.)

    Formative Assessment

    • See Activity #3
    •  

    Materials

    • MyPlate.gov: Poster of Dietary Guidelines
    • Brown bags
    • Various fatty foods for each students or groups of students (salami, croissant)
    • My Plate Powerpoint
    • Copy lesson assessment for each student
    • Student Food Diary (reflection)

    Background

    • Lesson: Six Nutrients your Body Needs
    • Lesson: Food Groups

    Procedure

    Introduce the learning objective.

    Begin instruction with the Dietary Guidelines PowerPoint.  (Activity #1 begins with slide 4.)  

    Activity #1: Class Discussion (PowerPoint)

    • Teacher quickly reads through the 5 guidelines as students follow along on their own copy. Students will highlight and reread guideline #3. Discuss how they can apply the guidelines (guideline #3) when choosing snacks and beverages.

    Activity #2: Guided Activity

    • Dietary guideline #3: “Choose foods that do not have too much fat” Gather different types of foods, brown lunch bags, scissors and markers. (possible food items: salami or other lunch meats, peanut butter, cheese, croissants, white bread, bananas, cucumbers, carrot, apple, chips, chocolate chip cookies, pizza, whole grain bread) (Option: Teacher demonstrates the activity while students make predictions).
      •  Have students draw a circle or square on the brown bag “as the testing area”
      •  Label the food items to be tested under each testing area.
      •  Rub the food item in the area with the corresponding name.
      • When the paper has dried, hold it up to the light and see if there is an oily spot left behind.

    Activity #3: Dietary Guideline Assessment

    • Based on what students know about MyPlate they will create two goals for healthy snacks and or drinks using guideline #3.

    Closure Activity: Back-to-Back Protocol

    Option A- Student directions for back to back protocol:

    • Choose a partner and stand back-to-back.
    • Decide who will go first. (partner A and B)
    • When the teacher says, “Turn around”, face your partner. Partner A, you will share your two goals for healthy snacks or drinks.
    • Partner B, it’s your turn to share your goals.

    Option B- Partner Whiteboard/Writing Activity 

    • Have partners work together to  use Guideline #3 to make two goals for choosing healthy snacks and beverages.
    • Share healthy snack and beverage ideas in small groups.

    Students decide on one partners' snack ideas to share with the whole class.

    Option C- Technology-based Responses

    • Students complete the response independently in Flipgrid, Microsoft Forms, and Seesaw, or other apps that allow students to respond to the prompt of making two goals for choosing healthier snacks and beverages.

    Extended Activities

    • You may want to search for free pre-made supplemental activities and content on apps such as:
      • Seesaw app.seesaw.me
      • Kahoot   kahoot.com
      • YouTube youtube.com
      • Choose My Plate    chosemyplate.gov

    Attribution

    Choose My Plate by U.S. Department of Agriculture | public domain

    Images without specific attribution are in the public domain or openly licensed and were obtained from Pixabay or Google Images (labeled for reuse).

    Lesson 6: Food label Literacy

    Lesson 6: Food label Literacy

    Overview

    This lesson is about teaching kids how to read and understand Nutrition Facts Labels. 

    Grade 

    • 3rd and 4th Grade 

    Duration

    • 2 days (30-40 minutes) 

    Standards

    • H1.N3.3a Identify types of information on a Nutrition Facts label. 
    • H1.N3.4 Explain how to use information found on a Nutrition Facts label. 
    • H3.N3.4 Compare and contrast Nutrition Facts labels for nutrition information. 

     Learning Objectives

    • Students will explain the importance of reading Nutrition Facts labels. 
    • Students will identify different parts of sample of Nutrition Facts labels. 
    • Students will evaluate products based on findings provided by Nutrition Facts label information. 

    Formative Assessment

    • You Be the Judge 

    Materials

    Background

    • Lesson #1-Nutrients 
    • Lesson #2-Food Groups 
    • Lesson #3-Dietary Guidelines 

    Procedure

    Introduce the Learning Objective-(PowerPoint) 

    Activity #1: Class Discussion 

    • Quickly review the 5 Dietary Guidelines (see PowerPoint.) 
    • Show examples of Nutrition Facts labels (see PowerPoint) and explain that it is nutrition information about the food in the container.  
    • serving size   
    • ingredients and in order from greatest amount to least  
    • additives  
    • nutrient in each serving 
    • calories 
    • Show video(s) on how to read Nutrition Facts labels (see Materials list above for suggested videos) 

    Activity #2: Guided Activity 

    • Play “Twist that Wrist” game (see PowerPoint slide #7) Students will be focused on evaluating the nutritional information for each food. This game will also be played in lesson #6 after they have studied marketing influences.   

    Activity #3: Food Label War:

    Use teacher discretion as to how many cards you would like to use for each game set.  (see PowerPoint slide #12) 

    • Objective:  Students will practice identifying parts of a food label 
    • Teacher divides students into teams or partners 
    • Find another partner or team to play with 
    • Divide game cards into 2 equal piles with the label side face down 
    • Each team flips a card over from their deck 
    • Teacher calls out a nutrition label category (protein, calories etc...) 
    • The partner/team with the highest (or lowest) number wins that round and keeps the cards.

    Closure Activity

    • Exit Ticket: (Class discussion/Pair share)   
    • How can I use a Nutrition Facts label to help me decide if a food is a GO, SLOW or a WHOA food choice? 

    Extension/Alternate Assessment

    • How can I use a Nutrition Facts label to help me decide if a food is a GO, SLOW or a WHOA food choice? Provide students with the Blank Nutrition Label handout. They can complete this independently, with a partner or as a family engagement activity.
    • Create a Kahoot or other game-based activity version on "Twist That Wrist" game.
    • Create a list of "Go, Slow, Whoa" foods.
    • Self-Reflection on Flipgrid or Seesaw- Students can reflect on their food diaries or on foods they have eaten the previous week. What changes would you make about your food choices? Please explain.
    • You may want to search for free pre-made supplemental activities and content on apps such as:
      • Seesaw app.seesaw.me
      • Kahoot   kahoot.com
      • YouTube youtube.com
      • Choose My Plate    chosemyplate.gov

    Attribution 

    FoodMania: Kids and Food in a Marketing Driven World by Marilyn Cohen, PhD, et al., copyright University of Washington, NW Center for Excellence in Media Literacy. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

    Powerful Choices: Powerful Kids, The Media's Calling: What Will You Do? By Marilyn Cohen, PhD, et all., copyright University of Washington, NW Center for Excellence in Media Literacy. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

    Images without specific attribution are in the public domain or openly licensed and were obtained from Pixabay or Google Images (labeled for reuse).

    Lesson 7: What Influences Your Food Choices?

    Lesson 7: What Influences Your Food Choices?

    Overview

    This lesson is designed to introduce students to concepts that influence our food choices.  The lessons to follow will focus on how our food choices are influenced by propaganda and media messaging.   

    Grade 

    • 3rd and 4th grade 

    Duration  

    • 1 day (30 to 40 minutes) 

    Standards  

    • H2.N6.4: Describe how family, school, community, peers, media, and technology influence food and beverage choices and eating behaviors.  
    • H2.W4.4: Identify how culture influences health decisions and behaviors.  
    • H3.W5.4: Investigate validity of health and wellness information, products, and services.  

    Learning Objectives 

    • Students will reflect on how reading Nutrition Fact labels help them make informed eating choices. (I can use Nutrition Facts labels to make informed food choices.)
    • Students will analyze what influences their food choices (I can recognize who or what influences my food choices.) 
    • Students will reflect on what helps them make good food choices (I can write three things that help me make good food choices.) 

    Formative Assessment 

    • Student flipbook 

    Materials 

    • Chart paper for class discussion 
    • Prepare a flip book for each student (see video) 
    • This flip book will be used for more than one lesson.   
    • Flip book can be used as an informational reference for their culminating activity 
    • Flip book can also be used as a formative assessment.   
    • Student Food Diary (reflection) 
    • Student Media Log (homework extensions and entrance tickets/conversations)

    Background

    • This lesson follows “Food Label Literacy” in the unit “Don’t Be Fooled by Food Messaging”.  Ideally, students will understand how to read food labels, dietary guidelines and have a basic understanding of the 6 nutrients and how each nutrient provides energy for our body. 
    • Students will have been tracking their media influences on the media tracker form(s) and will develop an understanding that marketing and propoganda techniques target them and their food choices, appealing to them to make a purchase.

    Procedure

    Ask students to take out their food diaries. Circulate amongst the class asking students, "Did anyone remember to read the nutritional information about the food they ate yesterday? What did you notice? How did you use the Nuttrition Facts labels to make good food choices?"

    Encourage students to pair share their entrees, noticing heathy choices and discussing NF label information.

    Class Discussion:  What have you eaten today? Why did you eat that? How do you decide what to eat? Who influences the food that you eat? What influences the food that you eat? 

    Activity #1

    This discussion is designed for the teacher to lead students through the flip book as students brainstorm in small groups or with a partner.  Students will be able to use this flipbook in the lessons to follow as they learn more about how other factors that influence their food choices, specifically how media influences their decisions.  Students may also learn resistance skills that help them make good food choices. 

    • Students are organized into small groups or partners for small group discussion throughout teacher directed discussion. 
    • Pass out flip books to students. 
    • Student Talk: Teacher gives students 5 minutes to brainstorm and list WHO influences their food choices.  
    • Teacher: Teacher brings the discussion back to large group.  A few students share their ideas. 
    • Student Talk:  Teacher gives students 5 minutes to work in small group or with partner to discuss OTHER factors that influence their food choices.  (Teacher may want to give students 2 ideas before releasing students to discuss.  For example: “When you go through the lunch line your choices are limited.”; “When I am stressed out, I like to eat.” (emotions/stress) are factors that influence my food choice.)   
    • Teacher:  Teacher brings the group together to share some ideas 
    • Student Talk: Teacher asks small group/partners to write their ideas about what HELPS them make good choices.  The teacher can reference previous lessons before releasing students.  For example: “Think back to My Plate, 6 Nutrients, Dietary Guidelines" but encourage student to come up with their own thoughts as well (for example: going for a walk or bike ride, etc...). 

    Activity #2 Teacher Led Discussion with PowerPoint 

    • Use the PowerPoint to lead discussion as students add documentation to their flip book (at this point, students could make a list, draw pictures, write sentences etc... Differentiate accordingly). 
    • Large Group Discussion:  Teacher can begin with a more in-depth discussion on how family and friends, individual preferences and celebrities influence food choices 
    • Students Write: Students write thoughts on flip chart during discussion.  Teacher can model on their flip chart.  
    • Large Group Discussion: Teacher continues a more in-depth discussion on other factors on the list that influence food choices.   
    • Students Write: Students write thoughts on flip chart during discussion.  Teacher can model on their flip chart. 
    • Teacher collects the flip charts to be used in future lessons.   

    Closure 

    • (refer to PowerPoint slides 5 and 6 to complete today’s activity and prepare students for the next lesson). 
    • Tomorrow we are going to learn more about how the media influences our food choices. For today I’m going to leave you with this cereal commercial. I want you to think about if you would buy this cereal or want to eat it. 
    • Teacher shows video or other animated cereal commercial where kids are obviously the target audience.  

    Extensions/homework

    • Tonight share with your family what you are learning about marketing techniques and nutrition labels. 
    • Select 2 ads that you think are targeting you as the audience or consumer. Add them to your media log. Explain: How did you identify yourself as the target audience?
    • Students can create a Seesaw or Flipgrid entry of the "flipbook" located on slide 3.
    • You may want to search for free pre-made supplemental activities and content on apps such as:
      • Seesaw app.seesaw.me
      • Kahoot   kahoot.com
      • YouTube youtube.com
      • Choose My Plate    chosemyplate.gov

    Attribution

    Images without specific attribution are in the public domain or openly licensed and were obtained from Pixabay or Google Images (labeled for reuse).

    Lesson 8: Media Influences and Propaganda

    Lesson 8: Media Influences and Propaganda

    Day 1: Media Influences Overview

    In this lesson students will recognize some of the sneaky ways that advertisers market food, including product placement and propaganda.  Kids don't like to be tricked, so they'll enjoy sleuthing out not-so-obvious ads.

    Students can use this information as a reference for creating their own advertisements (culminating activity) at the end of the unit.

    Grade

    • 3rd and 4th grade

    Duration

    • 3-4 days (30 to 40 minutes)

    Standards

    • H2.W4.3: Describe how media and technology influence health decisions and behaviors.
    • H3.W5.4: Investigate validity of health and wellness information, products, and services.
    • ITSE standard 3b: Students evaluate the accuracy, perspective, credibility and relevance of information, media, data or other resources.

    Learning Objectives

    • Students will identify appeals found in food ads. (I can identify why I am attracted to an ad.)
    • Students will identify different propaganda strategies. (I can identify different propaganda strategies that are used to influence my food choices.)
    • Students will identify how media influences their health/ food choices to improve their resisting skills.  (I can identify how media influences my health/food choices, allowing me to employ resisting skills.)

    Formative Assessment

    • Media Influences: student check off sheet
    • My Ad/Commercial Analyzer: student worksheet
    • You Be the Judge Game
    • Twist That Wrist Game
    • Optional: Exit ticket/reflection question or prompt for Microsoft Forms or Flipgrid apps
      • Which Propaganda techniques influences you most often?

    Materials

    • Media journals
    • Video clips
    • PowerPoint
    • My Ad/Commercial Analyzer: student worksheet
    • Media Influences: student check off sheet
    • You Be the Judge Game:
    • You Be the Judge handout
    • Twist That Wrist Game and game cards for each group/partnership
    • Go, Slow Whoa Game Board and meters
    • Branding Alphabet (optional) and key
    • Student Food Diary (reflection)

    Background

    • All previous lessons from “Don’t Be Fooled by Food Media” unit.

    Procedure

    As the lesson begins, have students take out media and food logs as teacher passes out the flipbooks that were collected previously. Have students pair share entrees and lead a discussions with questions such as: "What propoganda strategies or marketing techniques did you notice? What "claims" were made? How did you identify the target audience?"

    Introduce the learning targets (PowerPoint Slide 2)

    Activity #1 Get Thinking (PowerPoint slides 3-6):

    •   Teacher refers to questions in the PowerPoint to get students thinking about advertising.  Teacher records student answers on a chart.

    Activity #2 Introduce Media Influences (PowerPoint slides 7- 12)

    • Remind students of the Branding Alphabet lesson they did in library and tell students this lesson is related to those same branding concepts. Ask" Why were you successful at naming the different products in that activity? Because the marketer created a distinctive design, that is easily recognized and appeals to consumers.
    • Ask guided questions as you introduce each slide. 
      • What do you notice about the logos (color, font, size of font, shape, characters)?
      • Which logos pop out to you more than others?
      • How do these logos make you feel?
      • Can you think of a jingle (song) or phrase that goes with one of the logos?

    Activity #3 Media Influences Videos with Student Worksheet (PowerPoint slides 13-14)

    • Formative Assessment:  Media Influences Worksheet.  As students are watching the commercials, they will reflect on what influences their food choices.
    • View Commercials as students identify why they are attracted to an ad.   (If Links have expired:  We chose videos that include different elements of propaganda used in advertisements and we chose to stick with cereal commercials targeted to children)
    • Bring students back to the learning targets to check for understanding.
      • What did you see and hear from the videos that made the products more appealing?
      • Which commercial would you rate as best and why?
      • What makes these commercials appealing to kids?
    • Turn and Talk
      • What do companies use to influence you to purchase their product?
      • Why do companies use these techniques?
      • What will you do next time you’re watching a breakfast cereal ad?

    (This could be a natural stopping point for day 1)

    Day 2: Propaganda

    Activity #4:  Hook the Students with Jingles and Slogans,

    • Review Learning Targets
    • PowerPoint Slide 16:  Students will watch videos that get them thinking about advertising.  This also becomes a teachable moment to discuss jingles and slogans.  Videos are approximately 10 minutes each.  Adjust viewing time to your group of students.   
    •  Review the learning targets: PowerPoint slide 17
    • Define Propaganda (slide 18): How media/advertising influences our thinking.

    Activity #5 Direct Instruction

    •  Introduce propaganda techniques that are used to influence our food choices (PowerPoint slides 18-26).  We realize that this is not a comprehensive list of propaganda techniques used by the media.  We have chosen the ones we feel are most kid friendly. 
    • Students watch Propaganda Techniques by techlearninglab | YouTube (3 minutes)

    (Optional):  Back to Back Activity:

    • Students stand back to back.  One student gives the name of a propaganda technique.  The partner gives an example of the technique. 

    (This could be a natural stopping point for day 1)

    Media Influences Day 3: Review and Apply

    Activity 6: Checking the Backstory (PowerPoint slides 28-32)

    • Checking the backstory is an activity that integrates learning from the lessons on nutrition and media influences.  This activity is meant to help students synthesize all prior learning in the unit. Teacher introduces this activity by briefly activating prior learning and reviewing learning objective for the lesson (slide 28).
    • Directions for You Be the Judge:  The importance of packaging in marketing a food product.  Students are evaluating the front of a cereal box.
      • Examine front panel of sample sweetened cereal of your choice.
      • Ask youth to find a partner.
      • Have each youth reach into a bag to take one cereal box.
      • Give each youth a rating sheet handout.  (“You Be the Judge” handout)
      •  Tell each team to rate the 2 boxes they chose using the criteria listed (5 = great; 1 = not good at all)
    • Part 1:  Form rank-ordered line(s) based on package ratings.
      • Pick a nutrient on the nutrition facts label (sugar, fat, sodium) for students to rate their boxes on. (nutrition analysis) This can be repeated for any/all categories listed above. NOTE: You will need to teach students about the many words for "sugar". This describes how you would rate the boxes using the nutrition facts labels.
      •  Ask students to rate the packaging/marketing vs. healthy aspects of advertised food item. This activity is focused on visual appeal/marketing techniues.
      • Place Cereal Rating Signs numbered 1-5 on one of your walls; these can be used when forming a line.
      • Ask youth in each team to take one of the cereal boxes they’ve been rating.
      • Have everyone stand next to the number that corresponds with the rating their team assigned this cereal.
      • Each group assembled by a number must then decide how to further rate their boxes going left to right, from the best to worst.
      • The final result will be the group forming a line that has been rank-ordered from best box to the one judged not good at all.
      • Have youth briefly discuss the results.
      • Record top rated cereals and lowest rated cereals on easel paper.4
    •  Part 2: (optional extension of game) Form rank-ordered line based on % Daily Value (% DV) for nutrients. (Sugar, salt, sodium) NOTE: Students will need to be introduced to the many words for "sugar" so that they can identify them in the food labels.
      • Example:  Point to location of dietary fiber on Nutrition Facts label.
      • Explain meaning of % DV.
      • Talk about the 5 and 20 rule and how it applies to dietary fiber.
      • The 5 and 20 Rule for % DV. Use the 5 and 20 Rule as a quick guide to help decide what amount of a nutrient to aim toward, the 5 and 20 rule doesn’t define a food as good or bad. Instead, it can show how the food fits into your daily diet. Using this rule, 5% is a low amount and 20% or more is high. When we’re looking for important nutrients our bodies need like fiber: aim high, “the closer you get to 20%, the better!” If it’s 20% or higher, we consider that high; we’re happy to see that. On the other hand, when looking at fats and sodium, nutrients we try to limit in our diets, aim towards 5% or lower.
      • Form rank-ordered line (from left to right) based on % DV of dietary fiber in their cereal. (20% DV and above at head of line; lowest amount at tail end.)
      • Encourage youth to compare results with those given for packaging.
      • Record findings for group on the same sheet of easel paper as used above.

    Media Influences Day 4: Review and Apply

    Activity #7 Twist That Wrist (PowerPoint Slide 34)

    • Twist that Wrist is a card game that evaluates the nutritional value of products and helps students analyze package labels.  The game “Twist that Wrist”: You need the “Go, Slow, Whoa” Meter and deck of “Twist the Wrist” cards.
    • Put kids into teams so that there are two teams per game.
    • Team #1 decide whether a food item on the card is a “Go, Slow or a Whoa” food based on the front picture. Team #2 will decide if team #1 was correct based on the nutritional label for that food item found on the back of the card. (see directions from Food Mania)

    End of Lessons on Media Influences: It’s YOUR TURN

    • Next Lessons (PowerPoint 35):  Lead the students
    • Games: “Checking the Backstory” and “Twist that Wrist” from Food Mania)

    Extended Actitivies

    • You may want to search for free pre-made supplemental activities and content on apps such as:
      • Seesaw app.seesaw.me
      • Kahoot   kahoot.com
      • YouTube youtube.com

    Attribution 

    FoodMania: Kids and Food in a Marketing Driven World by Marilyn Cohen, PhD, et al., copyright University of Washington, NW Center for Excellence in Media Literacy. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

    Powerful Choices: Powerful Kids, The Media's Calling: What Will You Do? By Marilyn Cohen, PhD, et all., copyright University of Washington, NW Center for Excellence in Media Literacy. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

    Images without specific attribution are in the public domain or openly licensed and were obtained from Pixabay or Google Images (labeled for reuse).

    Lesson 9: Culminating Project: Create Your Own Ad

    Lesson 9: Culminating Project: Create Your Own Ad

    Overview 

    This is the culminating project where students will synthesize their learning from past lessons. Students will select a project from a menu of choices, where they will work collaboratively or independently to create an advertisement. This could be for a nutritious food. It could be an anti-ad/package design, where students redesign the packaging, so that it informs the viewer about why they should not believe the original packaging; this is attached as an option for the culminating project. Another option is for students to create an "Eat This, Not That" ad campaign that is focused on selecting the healthier choice. (There are a lot of ideas for how to successfully do this on the internet.) Students will use a worksheet to gather background knowledge on their food and brainstorm a plan for creating an ad using the medium of their choice.

    Grade 

    • 3rd and 4th grade 

    Duration

    • 3-4 days (30 to 40 minutes) 

    Standards 

    • Describe how media and technology influence health (wellness) H1.W4.3
    • Identify how culture influences health decisions and (wellness) H1.W1.4
    • Investigate resources from home, school, and community that provide valid health information. H3.W5.3
    • Identify resources to support achievement of a personal health goal. H6.W8.3
    • Recognize steps to a decision-making model. H5.W6.4

    Learning Objectives 

    • Students will create an advertisement incorporating media influences, propaganda techniques, and nutritional knowledge. Options include:
      • I can create an advertisement to sell a healthy food using a worksheet/checklist.
      • I can create an ad along the theme of "Eat this not that" where the viewer is presented with a healthier food alternative.
      • I can create an anti-ad for a food item to inform the viewer about why s/he should not eat this food option. 

    Formative Assessment 

    • Student completed planning documents
    • Finished product (advertisement)
    • Presentation/Sharing with target audience

    Materials

    • Bag with a variety of food names or pictures that you would like students to advertise (It is suggested that students select from some of the food items presented on the food cards that are used for the analysis of food labeling in previous lessons or real foods like fruits and vegetables.)
    • Handout:  Create an Ad
    • Art materials where needed
    • Computer where needed

    Background 

    • Previous lessons in “Don’t Be Fooled by Media Influences”

    Procedure  

    Activity #1:  Introduce Learning Objectives and Activity

    • Students will create an advertisement  incorporating media influences, propaganda techniques, and nutritional knowledge. 
    • Tell students they may choose to create a video commercial (TV, computer), print ad (magazine, billboard, flyer), PowerPoint, or design a package (cereal box, salad bar).
    • Divide students into partners/groups.

    Activity #2:  Pick Your Product

    • Students can randomly draw a picture of a food item from a hat, students can choose a product, or the teacher can assign a product for students to advertise.

    Activity #3   Plan Your Ad

    • Students work in small groups to complete the “Create Your Ad” planning handout.
    • (optional) Teachers may want students to use a story board/map to plan their advertisement.

    Activity #4 CREATE! And Self Assess

    • Students begin creating their projects

    Activity #5 Sharing/Publishing

    • Students will publish/share their projects with an audience in a variety of ways. (Whole Class, buddy classrooms, parents, STEAM night...)

    Extended Activities:

    • Food Fair:  Students can bring samples of the food items they were advertising, to share. This activity can also be modified so that students are given play money to purchase healthy foods to see if advertising influenced any purchasing choices.
    • Students can share advertisements/products and survey other classrooms to determine which ads were most persuasive. 
    • Research food and nutritional value of food items served in the school cafeteria. 
    • Give each student three chips to vote for best advertisement.
      • Possible awards might be: healthiest, most accurate and most appealing
    • You may want to search for free pre-made supplemental activities and content related to "Eat/Drink This, not That" on apps such as:
      • Seesaw app.seesaw.me
      • Kahoot   kahoot.com
      • YouTube youtube.com
      • Google   google.com

    Attribution 

    FoodMania: Kids and Food in a Marketing Driven World by Marilyn Cohen, PhD, et al., copyright University of Washington, NW Center for Excellence in Media Literacy. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

    ​​​​​​​Powerful Choices: Powerful Kids, The Media's Calling: What Will You Do? By Marilyn Cohen, PhD, et all., copyright University of Washington, NW Center for Excellence in Media Literacy. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

    Images without specific attribution are in the public domain or openly licensed and were obtained from Pixabay or Google Images (labeled for reuse).