Author:
Georgia Boatman, Barbara Soots, Ellen Ebert, Kimberley Astle, Washington OSPI OER Project
Subject:
Education, Elementary Education, English Language Arts, Life Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Level:
Lower Primary
Grade:
1
Tags:
  • ClimeTime
  • Flower
  • Leaf
  • Plant Parts
  • Plants
  • Root
  • STEM
  • Seed
  • Sprout
  • Structure and Function
  • climetime
  • wa-early-learning
  • wa-integrated
  • wa-science
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Downloadable docs, Text/HTML

    Education Standards

    Grade 1 - Elementary Science and Integrated Subjects: Plants and Their Parts

    Grade 1 - Elementary Science and Integrated Subjects: Plants and Their Parts

    Overview

    Elementary Science and Integrated Subjects is a statewide Clime Time collaboration among ESD 123, ESD 105, and the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. Development of the resources is in response to a need for research- based science lessons for elementary teachers that are integrated with English language arts, mathematics and other subjects such as social studies. 

    The template for Elementary integration  can serve as an organized, coherent and research-based roadmap for teachers in the development of their own NGSS aligned science lessons.  Lessons can also be useful for classrooms that have no adopted curriculum as well as to serve as enhancements for  current science curriculum. 

    The EFSIS project brings together grade level teams of teachers to develop lessons or suites of lessons that are 1) focused on grade level Performance Expectations, and 2) leverage ELA and Mathematics Washington State Learning Standards.

    Introduction: Standards, Phenomena, Big Ideas, and Routines

    Washington State Learning Standards

    First Grade Disciplinary Core Ideas include LS1 and LS3

    For LS1 and LS3, students are expected to develop an understanding of:

    • how plants and animals use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs
    • how behaviors of parents and offspring help the offspring survive
    • that young plants and animals are like, but not exactly the same as, their parents
    • availability of light at different times of year

    The Crosscutting Concepts are called out as organizing concepts for these disciplinary core ideas.

    Crosscutting Concepts:

    • patterns
    • structure and function

    Students are expected to use the practices to demonstrate understanding of the core ideas.

    Science and Engineering Practices:

    • planning and carrying out investigations,
    • analyzing and interpreting data,
    • constructing explanations and designing solutions,
    • obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information.

    Performance Expectation(s)

    Identify Performance Expectation(s) from Next Generation Science Standards that will be your focus (Climate Science related PEs preferred but not mandatory). Copy and paste below all the possible disciplinary core ideas and performance expectations that relate to your topic.

    1-LS1-1. Use materials to design a solution to a human problem by mimicking how plants and/or animals use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs.
    [Clarification Statement: Examples of human problems that can be solved by mimicking plant or animal solutions could include designing clothing or equipment to protect bicyclists by mimicking turtle shells, acorn shells, and animal scales; stabilizing structures by mimicking animal tails and roots on plants; keeping out intruders by mimicking thorns on branches and animal quills; and, detecting intruders by mimicking eyes and ears.] Addresses part of the PE

    1-LS3-2. Make observations to construct an evidence-based account that young plants and animals are like, but not exactly like, their parents.
    Clarification Statement: Examples of patterns could include features plants or animals share. Examples of observations could include leaves from the same kind of plant are the same shape but can differ in size; and, a particular breed of dog looks like its parents but is not exactly the same.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include inheritance or animals that undergo metamorphosis or hybrids.]

    Science and Engineering Practices

    Which SEPs will be a focus for investigating this topic/phenomenon?

    Constructing explanations and designing solutions in K–2 builds on prior experiences and progresses to the use of evidence and ideas in constructing evidence-based accounts of natural phenomena and designing solutions.

    (1-LS1-1) Use materials to design a device that solves a specific problem or a solution to a specific problem.

    Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information in K-2 builds on prior experiences and uses observations and texts to communicate new information.

    (1-LS1-2) Read grade-appropriate texts and use media to obtain scientific information to determine patterns in the natural world.

    Scientific Knowledge is based on Empirical Evidence

    (1-LS1-2) Scientists look for patterns and order when making observations about the world.

     

    Crosscutting Concepts

    Which Crosscutting Concepts will be a focus for investigating this topic/phenomenon?

    (1-LS1-2) Patterns - Patterns in the natural world can be observed, used to describe phenomena, and used as evidence.

    (1-LS1-1) Structures and Functions - The shape and stability of structures of natural and designed objects are related to their function(s).

    English Language Arts (ELA) Standards

    How will I Integrate ELA Standards (which standard, what strategy…?)

    (RI.1.1) Ask and answer questions about key details in a text. (Main idea, key details)

    (W1.2) Write Informative/explanatory texts with topic, facts and a closure sentence.

    (SL.1.1) Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 1 topics.

    (SL.1.2) Ask and answer questions about key details in a text, read aloud or information presented orally or through other media.

    (SL.!.5) Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions when appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings.

    (W.1.7) Participate in shared research and writing projects.

    (W.1.8) With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.

    (L.1.5)-Sort common objects into categories to gain a sense of the concepts the categories represent.

    Mathematics Standards

    How will I Integrate Mathematics Standards?

    (MP.2) Reason abstractly and quantitatively

    (MP.5) Use appropriate tools strategically Complete a table with plant growth data.

    (1.MD.2) Express the length of an object as a whole number of length units, by laying multiple copies of a shorter object end to end; understand that the length measurement of an object is the number of same size length units that span it with no gaps or overlaps.

    Phenomena

    Plants use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs.

    How do Plants use their parts to survive and grow?  Students have most likely seen plants that are big and beautiful as well as plants that are wilted and dying. Why do some plants grow so well here and some die? This can be puzzling to the students because there are things it would be fun to see growing in your area, but they do not. They may want to try growing other things at home and this will help them understand what they need to succeed

    The performance expectations should guide the formulation of phenomena beg questions such as these Regional Place Based Questions Teachers Might Consider:

    • Why do some plants grow well in one area and others die?
    • What is needed for a tiny seed to turn into a big plant?
    • What are the things needed for this seed to become an adult plant (water, sunlight, heat, soil)?
    • What would happen if a plant did not get enough of something it needs?
    • Can the seed get too much of something it needs?
    • What would happen if a seed gets too much of something it needs?

    Phenomena Resources:

    Communicating in Scientific Ways | OpenSciEd

    Big Ideas

    In order to grow, plants need to have all of their parts. If any plant part is taken away it will affect the growth of the plant or their ability to reproduce.

    Open Sci Ed Routines

    RoutineDescription of Routine
    Anchoring Phenomenon RoutineDevelop curiosity to drive learning throughout the suite of lessons or unit based on a common experience of a phenomenon
    Navigation RoutineEstablish and reinforce the connections between what we have previously done in a unit, what we are about to do, what we will do in the future, and what our driving purpose is in the contexts of the suite of lessons or unit.
    Investigation RoutineUse scientific practices to investigate and make sense of a phenomenon
    Putting Pieces Together RoutineTake the pieces of ideas we have developed across multiple lessons and figure out how they can be connected to account for the phenomenon we have been working on
    Problematizing RoutineEvaluate the adequacy of our scientific ideas to explain and phenomenon in order to identify what we still need to understand.

    Routines by OpenSciEd | CC BY

    Lesson 1: How Dow We Think Plants Grow?

    Note: Lesson 1 serves as the anchoring phenomena for the learning experiences and can serve as a formative assessment opportunity to determine prior knowledge and partial conceptions.

    Anchoring Phenomenon Routine

    Materials:

    • 8 ½ x 11 “Copier” type paper for each student
    • A seed and a small plant (not necessarily the same species) for the class
    • A large chart paper and markers on which the Teacher will draw students’ initial model, folded into 4 sections
    • A large chart paper that will become the Driving Question Board

    Preparation:

    • Fold student papers into 4 sections for students.
    • Title one chart paper “Our First Model Ideas”
    • Title the next chart paper “Driving Question Board”

    Vocabulary:

    • seed, plant

    Integration Points:

    • Look for integration points for English Language Arts and Mathematics within the procedures below. They will be noted in italics and dark blue.

    Procedures

    Procedure 1

    • Have students look at the small plant and the seed. Ask students How they think the seed becomes the plant.
      Ask, “What are the details in between?” Note: Begin sprouting lima bean seeds for observation and dissection during lesson 6.
    • The students will fold paper in half and again into fourths. Have students write First, Next, Then, and Last at the top of each section. W1.3 recount sequenced events

    Procedure 2

    • Then, have students draw their initial model of how they think a plant grows in 4 progressive steps and including at least 2 labels in each box. W1.3 recount sequenced events

    Procedure 3

    • Gather students in a large group, a “scientist circle” and debrief students’ initial models
    • As students share their models create an initial group consensus model, drawing it in front of the students.
    • Encourage discussion of what should be on the consensus model and areas of disagreement.
    • At this point record those things where the group agrees and indicate with a question mark or written question where the group is unsure. Add labels from students’ thinking. (Save this poster for a later lesson.)

    Procedure 4

    • Ask students to work with a partner and talk about what questions they have about the way plants grow, the parts of a plant, etc.
    • On sentence strips scribe the questions students have about plants, how they grow, their parts etc. - Ex: What happens to a seed as it becomes a plant?
    • Post questions on the chart titled “Driving Question Board” arranging them by types of questions. For example: these questions are all about a part of the plant so let’s put them together. These questions are all about what plants need so we will group them over here.
    • Alternately if students are able, they could write their questions on sentence strips to be posted. RI.1.1-Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

    Lesson 2: Planting Plant Seeds

    Navigation Routine

    Investigation Routine

    Note: Students plant (bean) seeds directly behind plastic of a clear cup or in a baggie taped to a window. Seeds can also be planted in the garden. (The purpose is to see the progression of change in a real plant which can be described using the transitional words, first, next, then and last. This is likely to be a two-day lesson.

    Materials

    • lima bean seeds (or other fast germinating seeds such as radish)
    • baggies/clear plastic cups (optional material could be clear plastic tubes or seed planters with clear panel side)
    • plastic wrap
    • containers of soil
    • 3 oz Dixie cup or other measuring cup
    • spray bottle with water or water with eyedropper
    • permanent marker
    • paper and crayons
    • chart paper for a class measurement chart
    • copies of plant growth chart for student notebooks
    • centimeter cubes, paper strips, cm. ruler-a centimeter measuring tool of some kind

    Preparation

    • Soak seeds overnight (be sure to soak extra seeds for planting for backups in planter cups or for plants that can be dug up, rinsed off and observed from a garden)
    •  Lay out damp soil, soaked seeds, cups/baggies at table groups, and markers. (may choose to put soil into
    •  cups/baggies in advance)
    • OR prepare garden soil for planting seeds
    •  fill three cups with soil - one too dry soil, one too wet soil, and one moist for demonstration of watering procedure
    • Draw a class measurement chart and post it in the room
    • Copy Resource 1: Plant Growth Chart for each student.

    Vocabulary

    • Soil, germination, cm/centimeters, compare, length

    Integration Points

    • Look for integration points for English Language Arts and Mathematics within the procedures below. They will be noted in italics and dark blue.

    Procedures

    Procedure 1

    • Students remind each other of what is on the initial group consensus model and what questions were surfaced yesterday.
    • Have student partners write their name and date on baggie or cup or on a label they attach to their container.

    Procedure 2

    • Have student partners write their name and date on baggie or cup or on a label they attach to their container.
    • Have students measure out one Dixie cup of soil from the soil container into their cup or baggie. (skip step 2 if you pre filled planting containers with soil)

    Procedure 3

    • Have students select their seed and plant it by pushing it down into the soil with a pencil making sure it shows against the plastic.  
    • If planting in a garden space give each student a small plot and have them plant 2 or 3 seeds.
      • plant seed as directed on package (about ⅛ -¼ inch (less than a cm or the depth of their pinky finger fingernail) below surface of moist garden soil
      • have students write their names on craft sticks and place them in the dirt near their seed plot

    Procedure 4

    • Seal baggie/cover cup with plastic wrap and tape to/set near window. The plants need heat to germinate, not necessarily sunlight which they will need as they sprout. plastic wrap will keep them moist. Remove that plastic wrap once the plant sprouts.

    Procedure 5

    • Teach a watering technique using a spray bottle (or eye dropper). Remind students too much water will not be good for the seed/plant. Calibrate spraying technique to say something like, “Only 3 sprays every other day.” Maybe use a generic calendar to show what days are watering days and which are not. Set up some examples of soil in baggies/cups that is too dry, just right and too wet. Have students compare their baggy/cup to the examples to determine if their plant really needs water.

    NOTE: this is a good place to break if the whole lesson cannot be finished in one day.

    Procedure 6

    • Give students another piece of paper and have them fold it into fourths. Label the boxes with first, next, then, and last, as in lesson one. Students should draw in the box labeled ‘first’ a picture of what their seed looks like on the first day of planting. Be sure to include the date. Include at least two labels. Note: additional boxes will be filled during future observations as the plant grows. W1.3 recount sequenced events, SL 1.5 add visual displays

    Procedure 7

    • Tell students that we will measure plants each time we observe them. This is the DAY 1 observation. Right now, the plant is zero centimeters tall. As we measure them, we will record how tall the plant grows using Resource 1: Plant Growth Chart
    • Choose one partner pair’s plant to represent the class measurement and be sure to measure and record that on the class chart. Students could create their own simple chart in science notebooks or a handout with a chart could be created and given to students to record in. 1.MD.2-Express the length of an object as a whole number of length units, MP.5-Use appropriate tools strategically Complete a table with plant growth data.

    Plant Growth

    Day 1 (date)

    Day 2(date)

    Day 3(date)

    Day 4 (date)

    (height in whole cm.)

    (height in whole cm.)

    (height in whole cm.)

    (height in whole cm.)

     

    Procedure 8

    • Continue to make observations of seed/plant in the next few weeks, documenting new growth and periodically drawing changes in the plant. Be sure to include the date of each observation and labels. W1.3 recount sequenced events

    Lesson 3: Plant Parts

    Lesson 3:  Plant Parts

    Navigation Routine

    Investigation Routine

    Notes:  In this lesson students will become familiar with the basic parts of a plant:  root, stem, leaf, sprout or seedling, seed, flower.  They will begin to think about what the parts of the plant do for the whole plant.

    Materials: 

    • Resource 2: Picture Packets (1 set per small group or set of partners)  

    Preparation:

    • Print either the clipart or photo sorting cards and labels (enough sets for your choice of groupings plus one more set for you to use at the end as a display). 
    • Cut apart and bag cards and labels so they are ready for the groups/partners.

    Vocabulary: sort, seed, root, seedling, sprout, leaf,  plant, flower

    Integration Points:

    • Look for integration points for English Language Arts and Mathematics within the procedures below.  They will be noted in italics and dark blue.

    Procedures

    Procedure 1:

    •  Ask students to remind each other of what we did yesterday (planting seeds).
    • Ask them about what the parts of the plants that will grow might be
    •  Review the rules of working in small groups or with partners (take turns, share the materials, listen to each other and respectfully disagree or agree).   

    Procedure 2: 

    • Explain to the students that they will be given a set of cards that show the different parts of plants.
    • Read together the label cards and have students spread those out in a line on their desk/table/floor.
    • Tell students that they will sort plant part picture cards into groups of what they think are roots, seeds, seedlings, plants, and flowers under the label cards.  
    • With their group/partner the students are to look carefully at the cards Resource 2: Picture Packets and discuss why they believe the cards belong in one group and not another.  L.1.5-Sort common objects into categories.

    Procedure 3:  

    • Students work collaboratively to sort the cards with their group/partner.  SL1.1 Collaborative Conversations

    Procedure 4: 

    • When the students have completed sorting, have the groups share with each other how they sorted and why  (this could be done with groups sharing to the class or sets of partners sharing with each other).  SL1.1 Collaborative Conversations

    Procedure 5:

    •  As a class come together and discuss their initial thoughts and any ideas that may have changed as a result of the discussions.   During this discussion come to a classroom agreement and use one set of cards to make a classroom poster to display for students to use as a reference if needed during future work.
    • On the classroom poster, tape or glue each label card and then tape the various plant parts up as indicated in discussion.   Some pictures could be in several of the categories.  It is important to ask students why they would put the picture in that category.  A student might say something like, “the wheat picture has seeds but I also see stems and leaves so it is a picture of the plant.”Point out the significant features of each plant part (example: the roots grow below the ground and seem to point downward.  The kind of look like they have tiny hairs going off a main part or the seedling is small and only has one or two leaves).  SL1.1 Collaborative Conversations

    Procedure 6:  Make observations of seed/plant, documenting new growth drawing changes in the plant..  Be sure to include the date of each observation and labels. This is the DAY 2 observation.  W1.3 recount sequenced events

    Lesson 4: How Do Plants Grow and Use Their Parts

    Notes: In lesson 4 students will learn more about how a plant grows and about what each part of the plant does.

    Materials:

    • Resource 3 video: Bean Time-Lapse - 25 days
    • Resource 4 Four Parts of a Plant video
    • Computer with presentation ability so show the classroom a short video.
    • Sentence Frames on a poster or sentence strips

    Preparation:

    • Have the video ready to play after introduction.
    • Write sentence frames such as these on a poster or sentence strips for visual prompts in discussing plant changes
      • “At first I thought...now I know…”
      • “In the beginning I thought, then I saw… in the books we read. Now I see… in the bean I’ve planted”
      • “When we sorted cards, I noticed...”

    Vocabulary:

    • time-lapse photography

    Integration Points:

    • Look for integration points for English Language Arts and Mathematics within the procedures below. They will be noted in italics and dark blue.

    Procedures

    Procedure 1

    • Revisit students’ initial model of how a plant grows from lesson 1. Have them discuss any changes they have made in their thinking as the lessons have progressed and the plant has grown.
    •  Have students discuss new details using sentence frames such as:
      • “At first I thought...now I know…”
      • “In the beginning I thought, then I saw… in the books we read. Now I see… in the bean I’ve planted”
      • “When we sorted cards, I noticed….”SL1.1 Collaborative Conversations

    Procedure 2

    • Explain that today they will see a video using time-lapse photography of a plant growing. Ask them to watch and see if there is anything they have not thought of yet in the process of a plant growing. (If you have time and students are interested you could run through the video more than one time.)
    • Show Resource 3 VIDEO: Bean Time-Lapse - 25 days

    Procedure 3

    • Ask the students to discuss with partners or table groups what they just saw.
    • Tell them to try and identify the parts of the plant that grew in the video. Have them use the class poster from the previous lesson with the word cards and picture cards to think about what plant parts they saw and to think about any parts they think the video didn’t show.
    • Make a comparison with the video they just watched and the steps of growth they have previously illustrated. Make comparison also with the parts of plants they saw in the card sort from the previous lesson. SL1.1 Collaborative Conversations, W.1.8- Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.

    Procedure 4

    • Revisit the Driving Question Board to see if any initial questions have been answered so far. Ask students if they have new questions about how plants grow or the parts of a plant.  
    • Guide the discussion toward the question about what the parts of the plant do.
    •  Add new questions to the Driving Question Board and group the questions that have been answered so far. SL.1.2- Ask and answer questions about key details in a text, read aloud or information presented orally or through other media.

    Procedure 5

    • Share with students that you have one shorter video that may help us figure out what the parts of the plants do and why they are important.
    • Show the Resource 4 Four Parts of a Plant video, stopping the video after each part to discuss or point out parts of the video. W.1.8- Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.

    Procedure 6

    • Make observations of seed/plant, documenting new growth drawing changes in the plant. Be sure to include the date of each observation and labels. This is the DAY 3 observation. W1.3 recount sequenced events.

    Lesson 5: Thinking About Our Observations

    Notes: This lesson brings together student learning about plants, their growth, parts and why those parts are important. It is likely to need two days for this lesson.

    Materials:

    • student initial models
    • student 4-part paper documenting plant growth with pictures and labels
    • Plant growth table showing growth in centimeters (cubes, paper strips, cm. ruler)
    • Class initial consensus model
    • Driving Question Board

    Integration Points:

    • Look for integration points for English Language Arts and Mathematics within the procedures below. They will be noted in italics and dark blue.

    Procedures

    Procedure 1

    • Have students observe their growing seeds and describe changes, using the scaffolding, “At first I saw___, but now I see___.” Measure and enter DAY 4 height on the data table showing growth in plant length.
    • How many centimeters longer is the plant on day 4 than day 1?
    • Compare your plant to a partner’s. Are they the same length? How much shorter? Longer?
    • Point out that even though they are the very same kind of plant there are differences

    Procedure 2

    •  Revisit students’ initial model from lesson 1 and the class Consensus Model. Have them add to their final drawing on the 4-part document of their plant’s growth and add new details and descriptions of the plant parts and what they do. 

    Procedure 3

    •  Bring the class to the “Scientist Circle” group meeting area along with data and models.
    •  Have students discuss new details using the posted sentence frames such as:

    “At first I thought...now I know…”

    “In the beginning I thought, …. then I saw… in the videos we saw. Now I see… in the bean I’ve planted”

    “When we sorted cards, I noticed….”

     W1.3 recount sequenced events SL1.4 describe events

    • With guidance from the class add to the class Consensus Model modifying it to be more accurate and add new thinking and learning with a different color. Students add new details to their Initial Models in their notebooks. Add the function label to each part. leaf/gather food, thorn/protect, stem/hold plant up, blossom/grow fruit, root/absorb water, skin/protect seed, seedling/push above the soil. Example: “the leaves make food for the plant”. Remind them of the video from the previous lesson. Alternatively, draw a new and more complete and accurate consensus model in front of students and with their input reflecting their learning about how plants grow, what plant parts are and why each part is important.

    Procedure 4

    • At this point revisit the Driving Question Board and discuss answers that have been learned to student questions.

    Procedure 5

    • Students will write an Informational piece to answer the question “Do plants use their external parts to survive?”, using the Initial and final Models both individual and class Consensus Model, and Driving Question Board as references for ideas and science vocabulary.
    • Use the topic sentence, “Plants use their external parts to survive.”
    • Have students write 3-5 supporting sentences, naming plant parts, and describing what that part does for the plant.
    • They can use a closing sentence such as, “Yes, plants do use their external parts to survive.”

    EXTENSION: (this would address the entire Performance Expectation 1LS1-1:

    • Provide a variety of materials, chenille stems, Q-Tips, paper, straws, string or yarn, tissue, small cups, etc. and ask students to choose one plant part that they could use as an idea to solve human problem. For example: a string could piece of yarn in a cup could soak up water and get it to a different place (like a wick) or a straw could suck up water to get it to a human’s mouth like a stem gets water to the leaves.

    Appendix

    There are many read alouds that might be helpful. Those from Epic require a subscription and ask for student information but have a free trial period. Ideally the actual book is available but often a reading of the book can be found on YouTube and might be more accessible for remote, at home learning.

    Resource Books

    Student reading resources

    PLANT LIFE CYCLE

    The following titles are available in EPIC Books. Educators can get free access to EPIC Books for themselves and their class– registration is required.

    • Live Cycle of a Plant: Pam Holden
    • Max Plants a Seed: Kerry Dinmont
    • Investigating: Plant Life Cycles: L. J. Amstutz
    • The Plant Life Cycle: Arnold Ringstad
    • From Seed to Sunflower: Mari Schuh
    • From Seed to Strawberry: Mari Schuh
    • From Acorn to Oak: Mari Schuh
    • Plant Life Cycles: Julie Lundgren

    Additional titles

    • Plants and Seeds (Sunshine Books Science): Colin Walker
    • Seeds Grow (Sunshine Books Science): Colin Walker
    • How a Seed Grows: Helene J. Jordan
    • Seed to Plant: Melvin and Gilda Berger
    • All About Seeds: Melvin Berger
    • Grow Seed Grow: Lisa Trumbauer
    • Seeds Grow!: Angela shelf Medearis
    • From Seed to Plant: Gail Gibbons
    • From Seed to Apple: Ruth Mattison
    • How Plants Grow (TIME for Kids): Dona Herweck Rice

    PLANT PARTS

    The following titles are available in EPIC Books. Educators can get free access to EPIC Books for themselves and their class– registration is required.

    • Exploring Seeds: Kristin Sterling
    • Exploring Roots: Kristin Sterling
    • Exploring Stems: Kirstin Sterling
    • Exploring Leaves: Kirstin Sterling
    • Exploring Flowers: Kirstin Sterling
    • Plants Can’t Sit Still: Rebecca E. Hirsch

    Additional titles

    • Flip, Float, Fly: Seeds on the Move: JoAnn Early Macken
    • Seeds, Seeds, Seeds (Sunshine Books Science): Brian and Jillian Cutting

    UNUSUAL PLANTS

    The following titles are available in EPIC Books. Educators can get free access to EPIC Books for themselves and their class– registration is required.

    • Amazing Plant Bodies: Ellen Lawrence
    • Extreme Trees: Ellen Lawrence
    • Meat-Eating Plants:  Ellen Lawrence
    • Healing Plants: Ellen Lawrence
    • How Plants Clean the Air: Ellen Lawrence
    • Prickly Plants: Ellen Lawrence
    • Poison Petals: Ellen Lawrence
    • Freaky Plant Facts: Ellen Lawrence

    Attribution and License

    Attribution

    Cover photo by Umut AVCI from Pixabay

    NGSS Lead States. 2013. Next Generation Science Standards: For States, By States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press | Public License

    Common Core State Standards © Copyright 2010. National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers. All rights reserved | Public License

    License

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    This resource was adapted from Plants and Their Parts by ClimeTime and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Access the original work for free in the ClimeTime group on the OER Commons Washington Hub.

    This resource was made possible by funding from the ClimeTime initiative, a state-led network for climate science learning that helps teachers and their students understand climate science issues affecting Washington communities