Author:
Clancy Wolf, Jeff Ryan
Subject:
Elementary Education
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Level:
Upper Primary
Tags:
  • ClimeTime
  • OESD114
  • animal adaptations
  • animal structure and function
  • animal-adaptations
  • animal-structure-and-function
  • birds
  • climetime
  • life science
  • life-science
  • models
  • structure and function
  • structure-and-function
  • wa-science
  • License:
    Creative Commons Attribution
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Downloadable docs, Interactive, Text/HTML, Video

    Education Standards

    Birds of a Feather (3-5)

    Birds of a Feather (3-5)

    Overview

    This sequence of instruction was developed to help elementary teachers who were working remotely.  We developed a short storyline that ties together a few sessions to help explore a specific concept.  We tried to include some activities that honored and included the student’s family and experience, and some that included the potential for ELA learning goals.
    Students make observations of the behaviors while watching short videos of Bald Eagles and Hummingbirds.  They then make observations of birds in their own neighborhood or school grounds.  They use these observations to explore th knees of these organisms and behaviors used to meet these needs.
    It is part of Clime Time - a collaboration among all nine Educational Service Districts (ESDs) in Washington and many Community Partners to provide programs for science teacher training around Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and climate science, thanks to grant money made available to the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) by Governor Inslee. 

    Overview

    This sequence of instruction was developed to help elementary teachers who are working remotely.  We developed a short storyline that ties together a few sessions to help explore a specific concept.  We tried to include some activities that honored and included the student’s family and experience, and some that included the potential for ELA learning goals.

    "Birds of a Feather" is designed around students making observations of birds near their home or school to answer the question: "How do birds get what they need from our local environment?"

    It is part of Clime Time - a collaboration among all nine Educational Service Districts (ESDs) in Washington and many Community Partners to provide programs for science teacher training around Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and climate science, thanks to grant money made available to the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) by Governor Inslee. 

    Storyline

    ( pdf version: https://bit.ly/37M07sa )

    The unit of instruction is centered on answering the questions:

    How do birds get what they need from our local environment?

    - Growing Elementary Science Distance Learning Storyline –

     

    How do different kinds of birds get what they need from our local environment?

     

     

     

    Asking Questions & Defining Problems 

    Introduce Phenomena or Problem

    Carrying Out an Investigation

    Investigation
    discussion questions-
    support student use of three-dimensions

    Read, Write, Make Sense

    Interactive read aloud to introduce ideas -model ideas to organize thinking and support literacy connections

    Putting the Pieces Together

    Bring together evidence from activities-synthesize- extending the learning based on student interest

     

     

     

     

    Engaging Students in Practices

    3D Logo

    Phenomena launch:

    Introduce the videos of the two birds, Eagle and Hummingbird.

    WATCH WITHOUT SOUND!

    Watch Bald Eagle: https:
    //bit.ly/3m238NC

     

    Notice and Wonder – Jamboard
    (Make a copy)
    https:
    //bit.ly/3g1DbK1

    Watch the Hummingbird:
    https:
    //bit.ly/3CL8CCf

    Video of the two interacting (optional)

    https:
    //bit.ly/3AFSdNI


    Birds of a Feather Jamboard - For Notice and Wonder Activity

    (This link will ask you to save a copy in your own Google sace.)

    https:
    //bit.ly/3g1DbK1

     

    Investigate:

    Family Wondering
    Bird Walk:

    Introduce the outdoor Family Wondering Bird Walk activity during a synchronous session.  

    PDF Version

    https:
    //bit.ly/3jRul2D

     

    Google Doc Version (must save copy to your own Google space.)

    https:
    //bit.ly/3jTafVR

     

    Preview the data collection sheet, and fill in one or two examples using our eagle and hummingbird videos as a class. (Rewatch the videos; examples of data shown below.)

     

    Students should complete this activity and collect observations asynchronously.

    Jamboard for recording. Make a slice for each student.

    https:
    //bit.ly/3g1DbK1

    Example data from Teachers in Workshop: https:
    //bit.ly/3iHUiSR

    EXTENSION option: If students want to do more, students can choose a bird-related live cam: https:
    //explore.org/
    livecams

    https:
    //explore.org/
    livecams/birds
    /

     

    NOTE:  If students don’t have access to a printer or printed handouts sent home, take time during class to have them set up the data collection form in a notebook or on paper.

     

    Data Analysis:

    Data is shared

    The class creates a class data set of the observations collected by the various families.

    What birds did we predict live near or around our homes?

    What birds did we actually observe?

    What parts of the environment did you think provided for the birds needs?

     

    Example Analysis Sheet:

    https:
    //bit.ly/3CPmfjP

     

    Reading options

    (CHOICE BOARD, teacher-facing part connects to learning goal; student facing part is about the general content of the article)

     

    Students read an article and then think about the needs of birds surfaced in the reading. They can add these ideas to their initial models using the sentence prompts. Ideas surfaced during data sharing should also be added

     

    Teacher facing Choice Board of NewsELA Options:

    https:
    //bit.ly/3yUlmnA

     

    (A free NewsELA account is needed to access these articles, which are available at several reading levels)

    Putting the Pieces Together

    Choose a bird...go visual...support it with evidence.

     

    Pick a bird species that lives in your community. It can be one you have observed or a bird you know lives in WA State.


    Go visual - Make a Bird Board model that illustrates the needs of that bird (habitat- food) and its relationships to other species.

    Examples:

    Drawin (Bald Eagle)

    https:
    //bit.ly/3CU2LL5

    Jamboard (Hummingbird)

    https:
    //bit.ly/3AH0iS6

     

    Gallery walk - compare contrast needs of Birds

     

    Assessment: Each student picks a different bird board and write a paragraph explaining how that bird’s need are different than their bird’s needs and how it meets them in different ways.

    Family and Community Connections

    Home Connections

     

    Ask a family member to help you think about the birds that live around your home and community. Make a list of these ideas on the provided Jamboard Discuss what you think these birds need to survive.  

    https://bit.ly/3AFt1qn

    Investigation done with Family at home.

    Do you know anyone who works outside or spends a lot of time outside?  Interview them about the most interesting birds they have seen or the most interesting things they have seen a bird doing.

     

    Technology Considerations

     

    Technology

    Provide students with links to the videos and Google Jamboard for launching storyline.

     

     

     

    Students collect and share data from their Family Wondering Bird Walk via images (if possible) to a separate Jamboard.

    Newsela articles are shared. This can be done for follow-up asynchronous work.

     

    Storyline Launch →  →  →  →  →  →  →   Investigating → →  →  →  →   →  →  →  Sensemaking

     

    Materials

    Standards Alignment

    This document lists the Science standards that are/can be addressed with these materials at the Third, Fourth and Fifth Grade levels.