Author:
Paige Junge
Subject:
English Language Arts, Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Activity/Lab, Homework/Assignment
Level:
High School
Tags:
  • AEA Learning Online OER Course
  • Argumentation
  • Claims-evidence-reasoning
  • English
  • Iowa K-12 E-Curriculum
  • Persuasive Argument
  • Student Choice
  • License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
    Language:
    English

    Education Standards

    Claim, Support, Question Activity for Persuasive Writing

    Overview

    These guides can be used as part of an anticipatory set to introduce persuasive writing and transition into claim evidence reasoning paragraphs.

     "Claim, Support, Question," is a "Visible Thinking Routine" developed by Project Zero at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. 
     

    Overview of Activity

    Intent

    These discussion and activity guides are designed to use as part of persuasive writing or evaluating arguments units.

    Activities

    The first guide uses a common text: New York Times article that explores the efficacy of "mental health days" for students. The activity asks students to make a claim about the topic and support their claims using evidence from the article or another source.

    After everyone has completed and shared the first activity, they are invited to explore the Times' student opinion pages, select an article that interests them, and repeat the "Claim, Support, Question" protocol. This provides a foundation for class discussion about persuasion and arguments and how they relate to the associated unit.

    Extension

    After students have completed the "claim, support, question" protocols, they move into creating CER (claim, evidence, reasoning) paragraphs. The questions they generate provide the basis for their reasoning - or explantion - for their claims and evidence. 

    Step 1: Claim, Support, Questions: Student Mental Health Days

    Instructions

    1. Navigate to the New York Times opinion article titled "Should Students Get Mental Health Days Off From School?"
    2. Read the article and annotate as you do, using either the supplied thinking codes or your own method. Be sure to provide a key for your teacher so they are able to decipher your annotations. 
    3. Complete the attached graphic organizer which asks you to supply the following on the article's topic:
      1. Claim1: on student mental health days: state your position on an argument put forth in the article. 
      2. Support2: provide evidence or support for your claim. Use evidence from the article, your schema3, or another source. 
      3. Question: Pose questions that you still have about the topic AND questions that you or someone else might have about your specific claim. 

    ________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    Footnotes

    1. "explanation or interpretation of some aspect of a topic"

    2. "Things you see, feel, and know that support your claim"

    3. Previous knowledge, what you already know.

    Step 2: Claim, Support, Questions: Student Choice

    Instructions

    1. Navigate to the New York Times student opinion section and chose a  topic then article that looks interesting to you.
    2. Read your chosen article and annotate as you do, using either the supplied thinking codes or your own method. Be sure to provide a key for your teacher so they are able to decipher your annotations. 
    3. Complete the attached graphic organizer which asks you to supply the following on the article's topic:
      1. Claim1: on student mental health days: state your position on an argument put forth in the article. 
      2. Support2: provide evidence or support for your claim. Use evidence from the article, your schema3, or another source. 
      3. Question: Pose questions that you still have about the topic AND questions that you or someone else might have about your specific claim. 
    4. Review your graphic organizer with a classmate and add any questions they have about your claim. 

    ________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    Footnotes

    1. "explanation or interpretation of some aspect of a topic"

    2. "Things you see, feel, and know that support your claim"

    3. Previous knowledge, what you already know.

    Step 3: Expansion to Claim, Evidence, Reasoning

    Your final step is to use the Claim, Support, Questions thinking protocol to create a CER (claim, evidence, reasoning) paragraph. This style of paragraph is the most effective way to communicate your position or point of view to convince others to agree with you. 

    The biggest difference between the CSQ protocol and CER paragraph is the reasoning portion. Essentially, you can use the questions you and your partner generated to write strong reasoning sentences (the most challenging part of the CER paragraph).

    Instructions

    1. Review your Student Choice graphic organizer, especially the Questions section.
    2. Decide which questions are most relevant to your claim and check if your support answers them. If not, find new evidence that does. 
    3. Come up with at least two reasoning sentences which explains how & why your evidence supports your claim AND answers your questions. 
    4. Review your completed CER template with your partner and help each other strengthen each part, if needed.