Author:
Barbara Soots, Washington OSPI OER Project, Cara Patrick, Tammy Bolen
Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson, Lesson Plan, Teaching/Learning Strategy, Unit of Study
Level:
Upper Primary
Tags:
  • Music
  • SEL
  • Social-Emotional Learning
  • Wa-arts
  • Wa-sel
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Downloadable docs, Text/HTML

    Education Standards

    SEL-Music Unit: Who Am I? Exploring Inner and Outer Space

    SEL-Music Unit: Who Am I? Exploring Inner and Outer Space

    Overview

    This unit, developed by Northshore School District in Washington, contains four days of lessons with suggested extensions that connect with SEL Standards 1, 2, 4, and 5 and Music Standard 2, 3, 4 and 11. The class will create the verses to the song “Floating in Space”. Students will engage in activities where they analyze emotional characteristics of music, practice emoting without words, review “song form” and rhyming patterns, and review space vocabulary words.

    Unit Overview

    This lesson was developed by Tiana Shuford - Northshore School District. The lesson format, with its Welcoming Inclusion, Engaging Strategies and Optimistic Closure are based on the components of the SEL 3 Signature Practices Playbook 2019

    Table of Contents

    Day One: Gaining Space Context with Feelings

    • Activity 1: Four Corners - Feelings with Songs
      Students respond to music excerpts and assign an emotion that best fits the feeling of the song. Each corner will be designated as a set of emotions from the Zones of Regulation.
    • Activity 2: Space Vocabulary Chart (Part 1)
      Class will create a vocabulary chart about space. Part 1 focuses on the “Word” and “Predictions” columns.
    • Activity 3: Space One Word Quip
      This activity is a quick way to end the discussion. Each student provides a one-word answer to a prompt, “What is one feeling or emotion that you associate with being in Space?”

    Day Two: Space Context

    • Activity 1: Pantomime in Space
      Students will practice pantomiming in small groups and as a whole class. The second part of the activity will focus on moving like objects in space. 
    • Activity 2: Space Vocabulary (Part 2)
      Class will finish the “definition” and “sentence” columns in the Space Vocabulary Chart from last lesson. Students will also create an action for each word.
    • Activity 3: Space Read Aloud
      Instructor will read a space-themed illustrated book to help students further engage with the concept of what it might feel like to be in space

    Day 3 - Song Form & Rhyming Patterns

    • Activity 1: Introduction to Song Form
      Students learn about Song Form and use Legos to show patterns in popular songs.
    • Activity 2: Rhyming Pattern
      Students will work in teams to analyze lyrics to find a variety of rhyming patterns.
    • Activity 3: Topics
      Students will brainstorm space song ideas including the mood and possible topics of their song.

    Day 4 - Write Song Verses in Groups

    • Activity 1: Mix and Mingle
      This activity is designed to set expectations of inclusive communication about songwriting while engaging in the questions: “How can composers use their emotions for their songwriting?”
    • Activity 2: Composing a Song
      Students will work in teams to analyze lyrics to find a variety of rhyming patterns.

    Learning Standards

    SEL Standards:

    • SEL.3-5.1A.3 Identify thoughts that are caused by emotions and feelings and how these thoughts affect my actions.

    • SEL.3-5.2A.2 Select and practice specific self-management skills to maintain self-control.
    • SEL.3-5.4A.1 Identify verbal, physical, and situational cues that affect how others may feel.  
    • SEL.3-5.5A.2 I can perform different roles in cooperative groups (e.g., leader, recorder, time-keeper, reporter).

    Music Standards (based on 4th grade):

    • Mu:Cr2.1.4 a. Demonstrate selected and organized musical ideas for an improvisation, arrangement, or composition to express intent, and explain connection to purpose and context.
    • Mu:Cr3.2.4 a. Present the final version of personal created music to others, and explain the connection to expressive intent.
    • MU:Pr4.2.4 a. Demonstrate understanding of the structure and the elements of music (such as rhythm, pitch, and form) in music selected for performance.
    • Mu:Cn11.1.4 a. Demonstrate understanding of relationships between music and the other arts, other disciplines, varied contexts, and daily life.

    Attribution and License

    Attribution

    This lesson was developed by Tiana Shuford - Northshore School District

    SEL 3 Signature Practices Playbook copyright Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL) and developed by the 2016-2017 Oakland Unified School District SEL Team based on the 2013 work of CASEL Consultant Ann McKay Bryson. | License Agreement

    Social Emotional Learning: Standards, Benchmarks, and Indicators developed for the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction by the SEL Workgroup is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

    Washington Arts K–12 Learning Standards by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial 4.0 International License.

    Cover image by psc631798 from Pixabay 

    License

    CC BY logo
    Except where otherwise noted, this lesson by Northshore School District is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License. All logos and trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

     

    Day One: Gaining Space Context with Feelings

    WA SEL Standard: Self-Management, Social Awareness

    • SEL.3-5.2A.2 Select and practice specific self-management skills to maintain self-control.
    • EL.3-5.4A.1 Identify verbal, physical, and situational cues that affect how others may feel.

    WA Music Standard:

    • Mu:Cr2.1.4 a. Demonstrate selected and organized musical ideas for an improvisation, arrangement, or composition to express intent, and explain connection to purpose and context.

    Age Range: Grades 3-5

    Duration: 30-45 minutes 

    Materials:

    • Playlist
    • Corner Feelings Visuals
    • Whiteboard or projector to display ideas
    • Butcher Paper
    • Ball

    Activity One: Four Corners - Feelings of Songs

    This activity is designed to have students respond to music excerpts and assign an emotion that best fits the feeling of the song. Each corner will be designated as an emotion or set of emotions. Students will listen to songs and choose the corner that best represents their corresponding emotion.

    Steps

    • Before the activity, create a playlist of contrasting songs and place an emotion emoji or set of emotions in each corner of the room. (You may choose to use the Zones of Regulation color for each corner if your school has access to that curriculum).
            •  
      • Corner #1: Sad, sick, tired, bored, moving slowly;
      • Corner #2: Happy, calm, feeling okay, focused;
      • Corner #3: Frustrated, worried, silly/wiggly, excited;
      • Corner #4: Mad/angry, terrified, out of control;
    • Instruct students to listen to each song excerpt and choose a corner that most relates to the feeling of the song.
    • After students have moved to their corner, allow students to discuss in partners or trios why they chose that corner.
    • Invite volunteers to share their rationale with the class. Consider hearing one voice from each group.
    • Ask students to consider the size of groups at each corner (“Which corner has the most students?”, “Which corner has the least amount of students?”)  To wrap up the activity, consider asking students which SEL skills they used.

    Variations: If time and space are limited, students may raise their hand for each of the four corners. Technology could be added as well by having electronic polls instead of students moving to each corner. 

    Transition: The last song or songs should tie into our space theme. Allow students to choose the emotion that they think is associated with the ambient sounds. Then, ask students if there is a place that they think this music reminds them of. Once a student suggests space, replay the song and have students move like astronauts back to their spots for the next activity.  

    Activity Two: Space Vocabulary Chart (Part 1)

    Class will create a vocabulary chart about space. Part 1 focuses on the “Word” and “Predictions” columns. This activity is used to provide vocabulary and ideas for students to utilize when they create their own verse about space.

    Steps

    • Prepare a large chart with four columns and tape to a wall visible to students. Label the columns “Word”, “Predictions”, “Definition”, and “Sentence”. Each column should be labeled in a different color throughout the activity.
    • Ask students to turn and talk in groups of 3 or 4 and predict the definition of the word. Once students have had the opportunity to discuss their ideas, call on up to 3 students to give their predictions. Write these predictions in the “Predictions” column in its designated color.
    • Go through the rest of your chosen vocabulary words in the same manner.
    • The “Definition” and “Sentence” columns will be filled out the following lesson.

    Modification

    Consider extending this activity and adding one new word every day to the space vocabulary chart.

    Space Vocabulary Chart

    Word

    Prediction

    Definition

    Sentence Examples

    Moon

     

    floating object, rotating, light source at night, etc.

    Large object orbiting earth. 

    Last night the moon looked like a piece of cheese in the sky.

    Activity Three: One Word Quip

    In this closing activity, each student provides a one-word response to a given prompt.

    Steps

    • Prepare the prompt on the board or on slides: “What is one feeling or emotion that you associate with being in space?”
    • Transition students into a standing circle with a ball. Explain to students when they receive the ball, they must answer the question with only one word and pass it to someone else in the circle. Once they’ve had a turn, they should step back out of the circle.
    • If a student does not want to respond, they may say “pass”.

    Debrief: As a class, reflect on which responses were most common. If time allows, create a word cloud to see how students feel about space.

     

    Day Two: Space Vocabulary/Engaging with Accompaniment

    WA SEL Standard: Self-Management, Social Awareness

    • SEL.3-5.2A.2 Select and practice specific self-management skills to maintain self-control.
    • EL.3-5.4A.1 Identify verbal, physical, and situational cues that affect how others may feel.

    WA Music Standard:

    • Mu:Cr2.1.4 a. Demonstrate selected and organized musical ideas for an improvisation, arrangement, or composition to express intent, and explain connection to purpose and context.

    Age Range: Grades 3-5

    Duration: 30 minutes 

    Materials:

    • Pantomime Cards
    • Pantomime Slides
    • Space Vocabulary Chart
    • Space Read Aloud

    Activity One: Pantomime in Space

    Students will practice pantomiming in small groups and as a whole class. The second part of the activity will focus on moving like objects in space. This activity allows students to move like specific “space” objects and engage in the space-sounding music in a fun, exciting way.

    Steps: 

      • Explain to students that you are going to “speak” to them without using any words - only actions. 
      • Act out a few scenarios and have students guess what you are trying to tell them. Consider starting off with a few emotion related examples (pretend cry to tell the class you are sad, etc.) Pretend to do other actions such as sweeping, singing, writing, or whatever comes to mind. 
      • Explain that “pantomiming” is when we use our actions instead of our words to ‘say’ something.
      • Break students into partners or trios and hand each group a set of Pantomime Cards. Students will take turns pantomiming the emotions and actions on the cards. While one student is pantomiming, the other group member(s) should guess what the card says.
      • Transition to whole-class movement with these Space Pantomime Slides. Play the accompaniment and have students move around the room acting out the given prompts.
      • Lastly, allow students to move to the space song in their own way.

    Debrief:

    • Ask students about their experience pantomiming:
      • “What emotions did you feel as an astronaut on this space adventure?”
      • “How difficult was it to come up with your own story?”
      • “What are some other art forms that we can use to tell a story without words?” (examples: painting, dance, sculpting, etc.)

    Activity Two: Space Vocabulary Chart (Part 2)

    Class will finish the “definition” and “sentence” columns in the Space Vocabulary Chart from last lesson. Students will also create an action for each word.

    Steps: 

    • In the previous lesson, the class began the “Space Vocabulary Chart”. So far, the “Word” and “Prediction” columns have been filled out. 
    • Reveal the definition of each word and read it as a class. Compare student predictions with the provided definition. 
    • Offer a few examples of how to use the word in a sentence. (You may choose to have students turn and talk to come up with their own sentences, and then call out groups to share.)
    • Ask students to turn to a partner and decide a good action for the word based on its meaning. Have students show their actions and pick an action for each word. (You may choose to instead have preselected actions for each word). 

    Activity Three: Space Read Aloud

    Instructor will read a space-themed illustrated book to help students further engage with the concept of what it might feel like to be in space.

    Read Aloud Suggestions:

    • “If I were an Astronaut” by Eric Braun
    • “You are the First Kid on Mars” by Patrick O’Brien
    • “If You Decide to go to the Moon” by Faith McNulty
    • “Pete the Cat: Out of this World” by James Dean
    • You may also choose to have a Read Aloud Video. Check out “Story Time from Space” – a non-profit that has videos of astronauts reading space-themed read-alouds while floating in space.

    Day Three: Song Form and Rhythm Patterns

    WA SEL Standard: Self-Awareness, Self-Management, Social Awareness

    • SEL.3-5.1A.3 Identify thoughts that are caused by emotions and feelings and how these thoughts affect my actions.

    • SEL.3-5.2A.2 Select and practice specific self-management skills to maintain self-control.

    • SEL.3-5.4A.1 Identify verbal, physical, and situational cues that affect how others feel.

    WA Music Standard:

    • Mu:Cr2.1.4 a. Demonstrate selected and organized musical ideas for an improv., arrangement, or composition to express intent, and explain connection to purpose and context.

    • MU:Pr4.2.4 a. Demonstrate understanding of the structure and the elements of music (such as rhythm, pitch, and form) in music selected for performance.

    Age Range: Grades 3-5

    Duration: 30 minutes 

    Materials:

    • Legos

    • Songs

    • Song Lyric Sheets

    • Rhyming Patterns Handout

    • Paper and Pencils

    Activity One: Song Form

    Students learn about Song Form and use Legos to show patterns in popular songs.

    Steps:

    • Introduce the following vocabulary –
      • Form: “a way composers organize music often with repeating sections and patterns”.
      • Chorus: “a section of a song that is repeated often between verses”
      • Verse: “a repeated section of a song with a new set of lyrics at each repetition”.
      • Introduction: “the first part of a song that introduces the feeling and theme before the singing begins”.
    • Assign different Lego colors for each part of the song. For example, red could be the chorus, blue could be the verse and green could be the introduction.
    • Provide student groups with bags of corresponding Lego colors.
    • Play popular songs and have student groups use the colored Legos to recreate the form of each song. (It might be helpful to have the lyrics on the board as students listen).
    • A few song suggestions:
      • “Never Ever Give Up” by Matthew West
      • “The Bare Necessities” by Harris and Reitherman
      • “Brown Eyed Girl” by Van Morrison
      • “Can’t Help Falling in Love” by Elvis Presley
      • “Free Fallin’” by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers
      • “I See the Light” by Mandy Moore and Zachary Levi
      • “Imagine” by John Lennon and the Plastic Ono Band
    • At the end of the song, call on a student to share their answer. Have student groups correct their answers.
    • You may consider labeling the parts of the song form on a lyrics sheet for each song.

    Activity Two: Patterns in Music

    Students will work in teams to analyze lyrics to find a variety of rhyming patterns. The teacher will demonstrate finding a rhyming pattern, then the class will work together to find the pattern for the song. Lastly, students will work in small groups to find the patterns. 

    Steps: 

    • Provide students with the following Rhyming Patterns in Music worksheet.
    • Have students work in pairs or trios to complete the worksheet.
    • “Directions: Please circle each rhyming word. Most often rhyming words are the last word of each line. Once you have identified each rhyming word, label each rhyme with letters A, B, C, etc. to find the pattern. Lastly, write the pattern where it says ‘Rhyme Scheme’.”
    • Demonstrate the first example on the worksheet by circling and labeling each rhyming word and writing the pattern to each rhyme scheme.

    Modification:

    Analyze rhyming patterns of the popular songs from the previous activity.

    Activity Three: Topic

    This activity will allow students to think about what their favorite space theme or characters are in preparation for their lyrics for their songwriting exercise next lesson. 

    Steps: 

    • Hand out a piece of paper and pencil to each student and have them answer the following questions as they listen to the accompaniment of their space song:
      • After listening to the accompaniment for our space song, who or what should be the primary topic of our song?
      • What is the mood or emotion of the song?
      • Any last ideas or details that you would like to add?
    • Have students find a partner or trio and share their answers to the questions.

    Debrief: Explain to students that they should save their idea for their song and that we will use these ideas when we create our space song

    Day Four: Write Song Verses in Groups

    WA SEL Standard: Social-Awareness, Social Management

    • SEL.3-5.4A.1 Identify verbal, physical, and situational cues that affect how others may feel.
    • SEL.3-5.5A.2 I can perform different roles in cooperative groups (e.g., leader, recorder, time-keeper, reporter).

    WA Music Standard:

    • Mu:Cr3.2.4 a. Present the final version of personal created music to others, and explain the connection to expressive intent.
    • Mu:Cn11.1.4 a. Demonstrate understanding of relationships between music and the other arts, other disciplines, varied contexts, and daily life.

    Age Range: Grades 3-5

    Duration: 30-45 minutes 

    Materials:

    • Paper and Pencils

    • Space Song Worksheet

    Activity One: Mix and Mingle

    This activity is designed to set expectations of inclusive communication about songwriting.

    Steps: 

    • Provide students with a slip of paper for students to write down the answer to their mix and mingle prompt. 
    • Write the prompt on the board for students: “How can composers use their emotions for their songwriting?”
    • Turn on music and have students move around the room until the music stops. 
    • Once the music stops, students find a partner and discuss their answers. 
    • Start music again, and the pattern continues as time permits.

    Debrief: 

    • As a whole class, reflect on what everyone learned. 
    • Ask: “What did you hear one of your classmates say that you found interesting or agreed with?”

    Modifications and Variations: The activity can be used as an Engaging Strategy or Welcoming Inclusive Activity. Consider finding other questions that relate to the content and process information. 

    Activity Two: Composing a Song

    Students will work in teams to analyze lyrics to find a variety of rhyming patterns. 

    Steps: 

    • Class will be distributed into 5 groups. Each group will work together to come up with a verse for the song “Floating in Space”. They will begin by choosing an emotion for their song and choose at least one science vocabulary word from our Space Vocabulary Chart.
    • Students groups will fill out their Space Song Worksheet (Pg. 11) together as they come up with their verse.
    • Verses do not have to have a melodic component. They may be spoken word. 
    • Students are encouraged to choose a rhyming pattern. 

    Debrief (turn and talk): 

    • “Think of your favorite song… what does it make you feel and why?”
    • “How might songwriting help someone process their emotions?”

    Extensions

    1. Introduction on how to give appropriate and respectful feedback. Students review each other’s work and provide feedback.
    2. Groups perform their verse for peers.
    3. As a class, determine the order of verses.
    4. Class performs their original song together for friends and family.