Author:
Arts ESU2
Subject:
Performing Arts, Visual Arts, English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson
Level:
Lower Primary
Tags:
  • Character
  • MTA
  • NE Art
  • Nebraska Department of Education
  • Performance
  • Setting
  • ne-art
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike
    Language:
    English

    Education Standards

    In the Jungle

    In the Jungle

    Overview

    This resource was created by Staci Simonsen, in collaboration with Lynn Bowder, as part of ESU2's Mastering the Arts project. This project is a four year initiative focused on integrating arts into the core curriculum through teacher education and experiential learning.

    In the Jungle

    Grade Level: 1st

    Core Subject Area: Language Arts Fine Arts Subject Area: Art, Theater

     

    Standards Alignment

    Nebraska State Content Area Standard(s): LANGUAGE ARTS:

    1.1.6.p I can make connections between printed text and other kinds of text.

    1.1.6.b I can name the characters, tell where they are, and tell what happens in a story

    Nebraska State Fine Arts Standard(s): THEATER:

    2.5.1.e Engage in creative play, using props, to tell a story.

    VISUAL ARTS:

    2.2.4.d Identify how images and objects are used to convey a story, familiar experience, or connection to the world.

    Core Subject Vocabulary:

     

    Setting Characters Dialog

    Fine Arts Vocabulary:

     

    Henri Rousseau Collaboration Performance Voice

    Core Subject Learning Objectives:

     

    I can use clues to figure out the setting and characters of a picture, just like in a book.

     

    I can write dialog for a character.

    Fine Arts Learning Objectives:

     

    I can create a puppet with moving parts. I can tell a story with a puppet.

     

    Procedures:

     

    Day 1) “Script” analysis

    • Students will view the picture “The Dream” by Henri Rousseau (cropped to show animals)

    • Students will work in pairs to answer the following questions (teacher directed questions):

      • Where does the picture take place (setting)

      • Name one of the characters:

      • What is this character doing?

      • Why would your character be doing that?

      • If your character could talk, what would it say?

     

    • Divide students into teams of 4. In those teams, students will use sticky notes to make speech bubbles for the characters in the painting. They will practice acting out the scene as those characters and saying the words they wrote in the bubbles.

    • Formative Assessment: Students will act out the scene for the class to show that they created dialog for all the characters.

     

    Day 2) Puppet making

    • Students will be assigned a jungle character from a list of characters from the story “Romper, Stomper, and Boo”

    • Using basic shapes for body, head, arms, and legs, students will draw a simple animal on tagboard and color with markers.

    • Students will cut and reattach one piece of their animal with a brad to make it moveable.

    • They will tape a craft stick to the back of the pieces to make their animal move.

    • Students will use colored tempera to create a jungle setting for their puppet show on blue poster paper.

    • Formative Assessment: Students will bring their puppet to the board with a jungle image displayed to show that they can make their puppet move using the sticks they attached.

     

    Day 3) Putting on the show

    • Students will listen to the story “Romper, Stomper, and Boo” from their music textbook Spotlight on Music.

    • Students will divide into teams of “elephant” “trapper” “monkey” and “birds” based on the puppets they made.

    • Students will be asked to decide as a team what kind voices their characters would have and create a sound for each character, based on their physical appearance and their what their role in the play is.

    • Students will practice saying their lines as a team in their small groups.

    • Students will perform the play using their puppets with the voices they created.

    • Summative Assessment: Attached Rubric

     

    Closure)

    • Ask students follow up questions about the painting and puppets:

      • How did your group create voices for your characters?

      • How did it feel to work with a group?

      • How did looking at the painting help you plan your puppet background?

      • Henri Rousseau had never been to a real jungle before. How can we learn about a place if we’ve never visited that place before? (apply to future art and lit lessons)


     

    Modifications:

    • Most students should need little to no modification for success in this lesson. Modification for emerging readers and writers will be to pair with peer models for the writing portion of the lesson. Students can contribute ideas and have peers help them with the writing. Students with developing spatial awareness will be given simplified

     


     

    Assessment and Reflection

    Content Assessment:

    Summative Assessment Rubric attached

    Arts Assessment:

    Summative Assessment Rubric attached

    Student Reaction (Engagement):

     

    I was only able to actually carry out the first half of this lesson in my room so I can only reflect on that, but the students were highly engaged. The students absolutely loved this project. They had a lot of fun guessing what the characters would be doing and saying in the painting, and they loved being able to make the puppets move. The only part they didn’t really respond well to was that I had to assign them a character and they didn’t get to pick their own.

    Teacher Reflection:

     

    In hindsight, maybe for next year we will have the kids pick their own characters and then write their own plays in groups. I could see this working with their classroom teacher for a writing assignment as well! I had never done puppet making before and I was nervous that having the students cut and reattach a body part would be too difficult. I really tried to avoid that problem by proactively reminding and modeling how to draw BIG on their paper and use big, simple shapes. I think that front loading really helped because all of my students were able to do that part of the project easily.



     

    Learning Goal

    Beginning

    Proficient

    Advanced

    I can use clues to figure out the setting and characters of a picture, just like in a book.

    Student was able to name the setting or a character of the painting on their own or with assistance.

    Student was able to name the character and the setting of the story when asked with little to no assistance.

    Student was able to explain the difference between character and setting and identify both in the painting with no assistance.

    I can write dialog for a character.

    Student was able to contribute orally and create a single line of dialog for one character on their own or with assistance.

    Student was able to create written dialog for the characters to contribute in a group setting with little to no assistance.

    Student was able to create written dialog with voices and expression and act as a peer model for other students.

    I can create a puppet with moving parts.

    Student was able to create a puppet with basic shapes but no moving parts on their own or with assistance.

    Student was able to create a puppet with basic shapes with one moving piece with little to no assistance.

    Student was able to create a puppet with complex shapes and details with a moving piece with no assistance

    I can tell a story with a puppet.

    Student participated in puppet show by watching from the audience or by holding their puppet without speaking on their own or with assistance.

    Student participated in the puppet show by holding and moving their puppet or by voicing a character if able.

    Student actively participated in the puppet show by holding and moving their puppet and voicing their character with expression.