Author:
Educurious ., Educurious .
Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson, Lesson Plan, Module, Teaching/Learning Strategy, Unit of Study
Level:
Middle School
Tags:
  • PBL
  • Project Based Learning
  • Social Studies
  • Tribal soveriegnty
  • Washington
  • Washington State History
  • pbl
  • project-based-learning
  • social-studies
  • tribal-soveriegnty
  • wa-social-studies
  • washington
  • License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Downloadable docs, Text/HTML

    Education Standards

    #Rights #Representation #Change

    #Rights #Representation #Change

    Overview

    Students learn how young people in Washington exercised their rights and responsibilities through “fish-in” protests to fight for tribal fishing rights in the 1960s. Students use this example of civic engagement to reflect on their rights and responsibilities today, then begin to consider the unit-driving question: How can we use social media to engage community members on issues of injustice? Working in teams, students examine a case study on one of three critical issues: natural resources, the environment, or hazard preparedness. The case studies help students understand how social media can be used to raise awareness and promote action. Finally, teams create a social media campaign that engages their local elected officials and community on an issue of social and environmental justice.

    Educator Welcome

    Dear Educator,

    We understand the joy every teacher experiences when they discover what lights up a student, and how that breakthrough can make way for a powerful shift in student learning. We’re thrilled to partner with you in bringing project-based learning (PBL) to your classroom, and we think you’ll love these lessons, which were created in collaboration with educators, learning scientists, and experts in the field.   

    Whether this is your first voyage into PBL or you’re a seasoned pro, we’re sure you’ll agree that this approach sparks interest, ignites possibility, fuels a love for learning in students, and brings wonder to the classroom.

    We believe Open Educational Resources (OER) promote equitable access to standards-aligned, high-quality instructional materials for all educators to adapt and use. Contact us at info@educurious.org to learn more about how Educurious can support district or school adoption of this curriculum and the development of PBL teaching practices. Explore Educurious.org to discover other PBL courses and order printed materials.

    As you join your students on this learning journey, we’d love to hear from you. We want to experience your students’ curiosity, celebrate their projects, and hear about your successes, as well as what we can do better. Click here to share your thoughts. Thank you for taking us along on your adventure. 

    Onward!

    Your friends at Educurious

    Acknowledgements

    Unit Credits & Acknowledgments

    Educurious would like to express sincere gratitude to our partners from the Issaquah School District, Mercer Island School District, Riverview School District, and Tahoma School District for contributing their expertise, insights, and energy. Their collaboration was instrumental in the co-design of this project-based learning Washington State History unit.

    A special thank you to Amy Abrams at Kent School District, Linda Henderson at Issaquah School District, Mark Klune at Riverview School District, Fred Rundle at Mercer Island School District, and Bridget Vannice at Tahoma School District for their leadership and support throughout this project.

    Design Teachers and Districts:

    • David Swisa, Tahoma School District
    • Elizabeth Honn, Issaquah School District
    • Linda Henderson, Issaquah School District
    • Natalie Page, Riverview School District

    The Educurious Team:

    Unit Development Team:

    • Writer: Chris Carter
    • Educurious Reviewer: Sara Nachtigal
    • Editors: Eddie Kim

    Production Team:

    • Erik Robinson, Haewon Baik

    Project Manager:

    • Haewon Baik

    Educurious Leadership:

    • Jane Chadsey, CEO

    Unit Poster Image Credits:

    • Poster created by Educurious with Canva

    License & Attribution

    copyright

    Except where otherwise noted, #Rights #Representation #Change by Educurious is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. You are free to share this material (by copying and redistributing it in any medium or format) and adapt it (by remixing, transforming, or building upon it). However, you must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate whether changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your adaptation. You may not use this material, or any adaptation of it, for commercial purposes. Please take care that adaptations do not introduce cultural bias.

    All logos and trademarks are the property of their respective owners. All art, illustrations, and photos in this work are used with permission and are not included in the open license. This resource contains links to websites operated by third parties. These links are provided for your convenience only, and do not constitute or imply any endorsement or monitoring by Educurious. Please confirm the license status of any third-party resources and ensure that you understand their terms before use.

    If you adapt this work, please note the substantive changes, retitle the work, and provide the following attribution: “This resource was adapted from #Rights #Representation #Change, which was produced and published by Educurious in 2022 and is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0.

    Unit At A Glance & Teacher's Edition Download

    Download full PDF Teacher's Edition Here

     

    Unit at a Glance       3 weeks (13 hours)                                   

    Driving Question:How can we use social media to engage community members on issues of injustice?
       

    [Engagement with an authentic, local problem provides a need to know.]

    Module 1: Rights and Representation

    DQ: What are my rights, and who represents me?

    Lesson 1.1: Our Rights, Our Responsibilities, Our Issues(45 min)

    Lesson 1.2: Local School Boards and Social Media(55 min)

    Lesson 1.3: District Legislators and Social Media(50 min)

    Lesson 1.4: Case Study Assignments(70 min)

    [Relevant knowledge is explored and applied to the problem.]

    Module 2: Issues and Opportunities

    DQ: How have people identified problems and responded to them?

    Lesson 2.1: Organizing and Educating(60 min)

    Lesson 2.2: Action and Advocacy(55 min)

    Lesson 2.3: Design Your Social Media Campaign(140 min)

    [Understanding deepens as students apply learning to new contexts.]

    Module 3: Change Campaigns

    DQ: How can I use social media to educate, advocate, and encourage others to take informed action?

    Lesson 3.1: Create Your Posts        (100 min)

    Lesson 3.2: Feedback and Revision(55 min)

    Lesson 3.3: Social Media Simulation(55 min)

    Lesson 3.4: Pinwheel Discussion(70 min)

       

    [PBL product—a complex performance task that illustrates student’s ability to apply skills, concepts and knowledge learned in the unit]

    Students create social media campaigns to raise awareness and promote action on an issue of social or environmental justice in their state and community.

     

    Unless otherwise noted, #Rights #Representation #Change by Educurious is licensed under CC BY 4.0.

    Module 1: Rights and Representation

    Module OverviewIcon

    Module 1: Rights and Representation

    #Rights #Representation #Change

    Unit Driving Question

    How can we use social media to engage community members on issues of injustice?

    Module Driving Question

    What are my rights, and who represents me?

    Module Overview

    In this module, students explore what their rights are, who represents them, and what issues are impacting their community and state. The launch lesson has students sort a series statements as rights or responsibilities to help them review what they know about civics. They see civics in action by studying the “fish-ins” and how young people participated. In Lesson 2, students research the people elected to the school board in their district and seek to understand the authority and function of the school board by looking at what issues taxpayer money is spent on. In Lesson 3, students listen to public comments on a sweetened beverage tax bill and vote in support or opposition to the bill, helping them understand some of the responsibilities of their legislators. Then, they research the people elected to the state legislature in their district and review their bill sponsorship records to understand what issues they care about and support. Finally, students begin zooming in on three key issues, which surfaced in their Module 1 research, and are assigned a case study to more deeply learn about that issue through an organizations effort to educate, advocate, and encourage informed action in the community.

    As students learn about their elected officials in this module, they are also considering how those officials use social media. This helps students begin thinking about which elected officials they want to tag in their social media campaign.

    Lesson 1.1: Our Rights, Our Responsibilities, Our Issues (45 minutes)

    Learning Targets

    I can:

    • Differentiate between a right and a responsibility.
    • Define right and responsibility in my own words.
    • Brainstorm issues affecting people in the community where I live.
    In this lesson, students begin exploring the differences between rights and responsibilities in order to discuss issues affecting people in their community. They start with the task of categorizing statements on 10 cards as rights or responsibilities. Then, students learn how young people in Washington have exercised their rights and responsibilities in the past to help others hold the government accountable to the Treaty of Point Elliot and the Boldt decision. Finally, students are introduced to the unit project (creating a social media campaign to cause change) and create a class Know & Need to Know chart.
    Lesson 1.2: Local School Boards and Social Media (55 minutes)

    Learning Targets

    I can:

    • Identify elected school board members for the district I attend.
    • Research the responsibilities of the school board and what issues they fund and prioritize.
    • Determine which social media platforms to use to engage my local school board.
    In this lesson, students learn about the people elected to their school district’s board of directors and what issues they prioritize and why. Students explore their district’s website for information on functions and responsibilities of the school board and the issues they prioritize spending tax revenue on. Then, students reflect on the extent to which their local school board has the will and authority to address the issues they care about. Finally, students decide if their social media campaign should include members of their local school board.
    Lesson 1.3: District Legislators and Social Media (50 minutes)

    Learning Targets

    I can:

    • Consider public testimony and practice voting on a proposed bill in a mock legislative meeting.
    • Identify elected district legislators in the community where I live.
    • Determine which social media platforms I will use to engage district legislators.
    In this lesson, students learn about state representatives elected to serve the people in the county where they live and the issues they care about. First, students listen to and consider two different perspectives on taxing soda and vote in support or opposition of the proposed bill on sweet beverages. Then, students identify their state representative and explore the bills they recently sponsored to begin understanding the issues they care about, and how their issues compare to the issues students care about. Finally, students draw on research to decide how their social media campaign should engage the state representatives.
    Lesson 1.4: Case Study Assignments (70 minutes)

    Learning Targets

    I can:

    • Examine content posted on social media platforms for key facts and details about issues impacting people in the state.
    • Identify hashtags, tags, and content people use to communicate about issues.
    • Determine how many times district legislators have sponsored or co-sponsored bills in support of natural resources, the environment, and hazard preparedness.
    In today’s lesson, students examine posts and content on various social media platforms about three issues (natural resources, the environment, and hazard preparedness). Then, they go back to their district legislators profile pages from the previous lesson to determine how many bills the legislators sponsored or co-sponsored that, in some way, support these three issues. Lastly, students meet their social media campaign team and are assigned a case study that informs their social media campaign planning.
    Module Assessments
    • Lesson 1.1: Rights and Responsibilities Group Slide Deck, Know & Need to Know chart
    • Lesson 1.2: School Board Election Ballot, Local School Board Research Guide, Social Media Campaign Planner
    • Lesson 1.3: District Legislators Research Guide, Social Media Campaign Planner
    • Lesson 1.4: Social Media Analysis, Social Media Campaign Planner
    Vocabulary
    • local levy: a local property tax passed by voters of a school district that generates tax revenue for local school districts
    • platform: a technology that allows people to connect and communicate—e.g., Twitter and TikTok
    • responsibility: an obligation to follow a rule or norm, and to accept the consequences if you ignore or break a rule or norm
    • right: something that should not be taken away and is often written into law
    • tax: money that people pay to the government for public services—e.g., education, police, and sewers

    Unless otherwise noted, #Rights #Representation #Change by Educurious is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0.

    Lesson 1.1: Our Rights, Our Responsibilities, Our Issues

    Module 1 Icon

    Unit Driving Question:

    How can we use social media to engage community members on issues of injustice?

    Module Driving Question:

    What are my rights, and who represents me?

    Learning Targets

    I can:

    • Differentiate between a right and a responsibility.
    • Define right and responsibility in my own words.
    • Brainstorm issues affecting people in the community where I live.

    Purpose

    In this lesson, you will begin exploring the differences between rights and responsibilities in order to discuss issues affecting people in your community. You will start with the task of categorizing statements as rights or responsibilities. Then, you will learn how young people in Washington have exercised their rights and responsibilities in the past to help hold the government accountable to the Treaty of Point Elliot and the Boldt decision. Finally, you will be introduced to the unit project (creating a social media campaign to cause change) and create your class Know & Need to Know chart.

    Lesson Steps

    1. Examine the difference between a right and a responsibility. Use the Rights and Responsibilities handout to discuss the differences between rights and responsibilities, then define a right and a responsibility in your own words.
    2. Learn about young people exercising their rights and responsibilities. Watch a portion of the video As Long as the Rivers Run to see an example of students exercising their rights and responsibilities in support of tribal treaty rights. Discuss what rights and responsibilities the students exercised, and infer how the government and the tribes perceived their civic actions.
    3. Create class Know & Need to Know chart. Learn about the unit and the unit project, creating a social media campaign to promote change. Use the Know & Need to Know chart handout to discuss in your group the issues affecting students and the community where you live. Finally, record questions you have about the project.
    Explore More

     

    Teacher Preparation Notes

    Pacing
    Lesson Timing:45 minutes
    Standards
    C4.6-8.2: Describe the relationships between the actions of people in Washington state and the ideals outlined in the Washington state constitution.H4.6-8.2: Analyze how a historical event in Washington state history helps us understand contemporary issues and events.
    • CCSS
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.1: Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.
    Lesson Resources
    For StudentsFor EducatorsMaterials
    • Scissors  
    • Chart paper and markers (optional)
    Lesson Overview
    In this lesson, students begin exploring the differences between rights and responsibilities in order to discuss issues affecting people in their community. They start with the task of categorizing statements on 10 cards as rights or responsibilities. Then, students learn how young people in Washington have exercised their rights and responsibilities in the past to help others hold the government accountable to the Treaty of Point Elliot and the Boldt decision. Finally, students are introduced to the unit project (creating a social media campaign to cause change) and create a class Know & Need to Know chart.
    Teacher Preparation
    • Step 1: Decide how you want to manage materials. Students are provided a handout with 12 cards that they need to cut out. You can either have students cut out the cards in real time during the lesson, which takes several minutes, or you can cut out the cards in advance and paper clip them in order to save time.
    • Step 2: Practice playing the video in your classroom. The sound and video quality varies at points. Preview the portion students are watching and check that the volume of different speakers can be heard in your space with your equipment.
    • Step 3: Decide where to locate your class Know & Need to Know chart. Create this chart during this lesson and refer back to it throughout the unit to track new understandings and new questions. The chart should be accessible to students and visible in your room.

    Lesson Steps in Detail

    Step 1: Examine the difference between a right and a responsibility (15 min)

    Purpose: Students launch into this unit by sorting and categorizing statements as rights and responsibilities. Some of these statements are from the Constitution of Washington State, one is from a tribal treaty, and others are from school websites or the U.S. Constitution. Ultimately, students draw on their learning to define right and responsibility in their own words.

    You might say: To kick off this unit, titled #Rights #Representation #Change, you will be tasked with sorting statements into two categories, rights and responsibilities. This will help you start to think about the difference between the two, and why both are important.

    [Slide 2] Facilitate student sorting of rights and responsibilities.

    • Slide 2. Distribute the Rights and Responsibilities handout and review the directions.
      • Organize students into pairs or trios.
      • Explain to students they have five minutes to discuss and sort the statements, and that they should be ready to share why they sorted the cards the way the did.
    • Use the Rights and Responsibilities Teacher Key to monitor and support student sorting of the ten statements.
    • When students have finished sorting, invite them to share the statements in each category.
    • Ask students probing questions to make student thinking visible, such as.
      • Why is this statement a right and not a responsibility?
      • Why is this statement a responsibility and not a right?
    • Explain to students that rights and responsibilities come from different places.
    • Talking points:
        • Many of the rights we enjoy today are found in the state Constitution’s Bill of Rights.
        • Some rights are found in tribal treaties that are specific to tribes in Washington.
        • Other rights can be found in student handbooks in the schools.
        • Many of our responsibilities can also be found in the state’s Constitution, tribal treaties, and student handbooks. Others responsibilities are found in laws, such as speed limits.

    [Slides 3–4] Define right and responsibility.

    • Slide 3. Prompt pairs and trios to find the cards where they define each term and provide an example.
      • Review the directions with students.
        • Define right in your own words and provide an example of a right not identified in the card sort activity.
        • Define responsibility in your own words and provide an example of a responsibility not identified in the card sort activity.
      • Explain to students they have five minutes to discuss, define, and provide an example, and that they should be ready to share with the class.
      • Use the Rights and Responsibilities Teacher KEY to monitor and support student thinking.
      • Invite students to share their definitions and examples with the class.
    • Slide 4. Share definitions for the terms right and responsibility.
      • A right is something that should not be taken away and is often written into law.
      • A responsibility is an obligation to follow a rule or norm, and to accept the consequences if you ignore or break a rule or norm.

    You might say: Throughout this unit, you will learn about where your rights and responsibilities come from, who protects those rights, and how you can cause change if your rights or the rights of others are not being protected.

    Step 2: Learn about young people exercising their rights and responsibilities (15 min)

    Purpose: Students watch part of a corresponding video, As Long as the River Runs, from the STI curriculum unit Contemporary Washington State – The Boldt Decision: 40 Years Later (Boldt I&II), to learn about how young people exercised their rights and responsibilities to support tribes and promote change. This helps students begin understanding and seeing that students have a voice, they can and do represent themselves, and they can cause real and meaningful change.

    You might say: Historically, youth have been active participants in civic action in Washington. One the most powerful examples of youth civic action in state history was when young people joined tribes to protest and hold the government accountable to their commitments in the Steven’s Treaties. Today, we will learn key facts about “fish-ins,” why youth got involved, and what was the outcome.

    [Slide 5] Introduce students to tribal-treaty fishing rights.

    • Talking points:
      • In the 1960s there were a series of “fish-in” protests in Washington to fight for tribal fishing rights that were promised in the treaties signed by governor Isaac Stevens in the 1850s.
      • These protests attracted many young people.
      • The protests and civil disobedience led up to the court decision U.S. vs. Washington, known as the Boldt decision, where the issue of fishing rights was finally settled.
      • However, the Boldt decision did not end the conflict of fishing rights between tribes, the government, and others. Conflict and issues still persist today, with much attention of the effect of dams on tribal fishing rights.

    [Slides 6–7] Learn about civil disobedience and the Nisqually Indians of Frank’s Landing in Washington.

    • Slide 6. Explain to students that they are watching a 5-minute clip from a 1971 documentary on the “fish in” protests that attracted young people from across Washington and the nation.
    • As students watch, have them take notes on two questions.
      • What rights were students and tribes exercising?
      • Whose responsibility was it to uphold the treaties?
    • Play the video As Long as the Rivers Run from 15:00–20:19. The full documentary is one hour and five seconds long.
    • Prompt students to discuss and respond to the two questions in their pairs or trios.
    • Invite students to share out their responses with the class.
      • Possible response: Students and tribes were exercising their right to free speech and assembly/protest. Tribes were exercising their tribal-treaty fishing rights.
      • Possible response: The government is responsible for respecting tribal-treaty rights, and in this instance, they violated that sacred responsibility, so the people held them accountable.
    • Slide 7. Ask: What other examples can you think of where young people have exercised their rights and/or caused change?
    • Slide 8. Share with students the youth issues that the United Nations has identified. Consider projecting the webpage (https://www.un.org/youthenvoy/youth-statistics/), rather than referring to the slide, in order to improve readability.
      • Explain to students that countries from around the world have identified the following issues confronting youth today.
      • Read each issue aloud.
      • Ask:
        • How could these topics present issues for young people?
        • How are these topics similar or different from what you observed in the “fish-ins” protest?
    Step 3: Create class Know & Need to Know chart(15 min)

    Purpose: Students review the unit poster and learn about the project they are working on in this unit. Then, they draw on their prior knowledge, lived experiences, and identities to reflect on what they know about issues affecting their community and what questions they have about creating and implementing social media campaigns to raise awareness and cause change. This helps students ground themselves with the focus of the unit and leverage their thinking to start making sense of the unit project.

    [Slide 9] Provide an overview of the unit.

    • Talking points:
    • Unit Driving Question: How can we use social media to engage community members on issues of injustice?
    • Module 1 Driving Question: What are my rights, and who represents me?
    • Module 2 Driving Question: How have people identified problems and responded to them?
    • Module 3 Driving Question: How can I use social media to educate, advocate, and encourage others to take informed action?
    • Final Product: Students create social media campaigns to raise awareness and promote action on an issue of social or environmental justice in their state and community.

    [Slide 10] Have students access their prior knowledge about issues affecting young people and social media campaigns that raise awareness and cause change.

    • Create a class Know & Need to Know chart to engage students in activating what they already know about the unit topic and final product, as well as raising questions they want to answer.
    • Facilitate a turn-and-talk on the three questions below, then a whole-class share-out. As students share out on the class Know & Need to Know chart.
      • What issues are affecting you and your community? Identify which groups of people are most affected by each issue.
      • What do you know about social media campaigns that raise awareness and cause change?
      • What do you need to know about creating a social media campaign to raise awareness about, or cause change for, one of the issues you identified?
    • Explain to students that as they progress through the unit, they continue revisiting and updating the Know & Need to Know chart.
    Teacher Tip: Tracking and Resolving Questions with a Know & Need to Know ChartA Know & Need to Know chart provides an opportunity for students to track how their thinking changes over time on a whole-class level. For project-based learning units, the chart helps leverage students’ ideas about the connections between the content they are learning and their project work. To learn more about Know & Need to Know charts in PBL, read about different tactics and pedagogical considerations at the Opening Paths Consulting website and how to use students’ questions for planning and assessment from PBL Works.

    Unless otherwise noted, #Rights #Representation #Change by Educurious is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0.

    Lesson 1.2: Local School Boards and Social Media

    Module 1 Icon

    Unit Driving Question:

    How can we use social media to engage community members on issues of injustice?

    Module Driving Question:

    What are my rights, and who represents me?

    Learning Targets

    I can:

    • Identify elected school board members for the district I attend.
    • Research the responsibilities of the school board and what issues they fund and prioritize.
    • Determine which social media platforms to use to engage my local school board.

    Purpose

    In this lesson, you will learn about the people elected to your school district’s board of directors and what issues they prioritize and why. You will explore your district’s website for information on functions and responsibilities of the school board and the issues they prioritize spending tax revenue on. Then, you will reflect on the extent to which your local school board has the authority to address the issues you care about. Finally, you will decide how your social media campaign should engage members of your local school board.

    Lesson Steps

    1. Vote in a school board election. Use the School Board Election Ballot to review three candidate profiles and cast your vote for one candidate. Reflect on how the class voted and discuss the implications of giving students the right to vote in a school board election.
    2. Research the issues important to your district. Use the Local School Board Research Guide, and reference the How to Navigate a School District’s Website as needed, to learn about the people elected to your district’s school board, their obligations to voters, and what issues they spend school district tax revenue on.
    3. Begin planning your social media campaign. Using your research and the Social Media Fact Sheet, indicate in your Social Media Campaign Planner how you will engage your local school board on social media.
    Explore More

    Teacher Preparation Notes

    Pacing
    Lesson Timing:55 minutes
    Standards
    C4.6-8.3: Employ strategies for civic involvement that addresses a state or local issue.E3.6-8.2: Analyze the role of government in the economy of Washington state through taxation, spending, and policy setting in the past and present.
    • CCSS
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.6: Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author's point of view or purpose (e.g., loaded language, inclusion or avoidance of particular facts).
    Lesson Resources
    For StudentsFor EducatorsMaterials
    • n/a
    Lesson Overview
    In this lesson, students learn about the people elected to their school district’s board of directors and what issues they prioritize and why. Students explore their district’s website for information on functions and responsibilities of the school board and the issues they prioritize spending tax revenue on. Then, students reflect on the extent to which their local school board has the will and authority to address the issues they care about. Finally, students decide if their social media campaign should include members of their local school board.
    Teacher Preparation
    Step 1: Decide on a voting system. Students participate in a mock election. Consider having students submit their vote via a Google Form, or other online survey, so students can see the results in real time.Step 2: Complete the Local School Board Research Guide handout. Students navigate their school district’s website in order to find information on elected school board members. Every website is different. It is helpful for you to complete the handout in advance of your students so you can foresee any challenges or questions students might have.

    Lesson Steps in Detail

    Step 1: Vote in a school board election(10 min)

    Purpose: Students try their hand at voting in a mock school board election. Students are provided a ballot and three candidate profiles. They consider their issues, the issues each candidate cares about, and vote for the candidate they think will best represent them. This helps students experience the responsibility of voting, and creates interest in learning about their local school board.

    You might say: This lesson helps you get to know the people that are elected to our district’s school board. School boards are a form of government and make decisions about what students learn and how students learn. They decide how districts will spend millions of dollars each year. To kick-off this lesson, you will vote in a mock school board election to experience the responsibility of voting, and the joys and challenges of that responsibility.

    [Slide 2] Introduce the election ballot.

    • Distribute a School Board Election Ballot to each student and review the directions.
    • Orient students to the information on each ballot.
      • Elected experience
      • Professional experience—where they have worked
      • Education
      • Community service
      • Statement of their position, beliefs, and values
    • Explain to students that they should read each profile and vote for one candidate that they feel best represent their values, beliefs, and issues.
    • Provide students time to read and vote.

    [Slide 3] Facilitate a debrief of the election.

    • Tally up the votes for each candidate and share the results with the class.
    • Have students turn and talk.
      • Did the results surprise you? Why or why not?
      • What qualities made you think the candidate you voted for would best represent your values, beliefs, and issues as a student?
      • Why do you think most local school boards, and school boards around the country, do not elect students or young people?

    Open and project the article, "Few Student Board Members Can Vote. Should that Change?"

    • Scroll down to the map titled “Local School Boards” and share the following fact.
      • In 30 states, students are able to serve on some local school boards, but in only 2 states are students able to vote.
    • Explain to students that in this lesson, they have a chance to see if there are students who serve on their local school board and how the issues they identified in the previous lesson compare to the issues the school board has authority to address.
    Step 2: Research the issues important to your district(25 min)

    Purpose: Students explore the responsibilities and functions of the people elected to their school district’s school board. They research who was most recently elected, their responsibilities to students and families, and what issues they prioritize spending tax revenue on to improve the educational experience and outcomes of students. Students apply what they learn in this step to help them design their social media campaign in the next step.

    [Slide 4] Introduce students to their guided research task.

    • Organize students into pairs or trios.
    • Distribute a copy of the Local School Board Research Guide to each pair or trio and review the directions.
    • Share the school district’s website with students or have them identify it through a search.

    Demonstrate for students how to navigate their school district’s website to find the information they need. Refer to the How to Navigate a School District’s Website resource to support your demonstration.

    • Demonstrate how to find the school board section of a district website.
    • Demonstrate how to find details about each elected school board member.
    • Demonstrate how to find the responsibilities and functions of the school board.
    • Demonstrate how to find the most recent levy information.
    • Demonstrate how to find the issues the school board prioritizes to spend tax money on.

    Provide students time to engage in research.

    [Slide 5] Facilitate small group and whole class reflection and discussion on their research. When students have completed their research, ask:

    • How are issues prioritized by your local school board similar and different from the issues you identified in in the previous lesson?
      • Reference the class Know & Need to Know chart.
    • Based on your research, what issues do you think school boards have the authority to address?
    • What issues are beyond their control? And why?
    Step 3: Begin planning your social media campaign(20 min)

    Purpose: Students meet their social media teams and explore different ways they can engage local school board members in their social media campaign. Students have not yet identified their issue, which happens in Module 2. By the end of Step 3, students have learned who their local school board members are, what authority they have, and the different ways they can engage them on social media.

    [Slide 6] Organize students into their social media teams for this unit.

    • Create teams of 3 or 4.
    • Provide a team building activity if students have not work together before.

    [Slides 7–9] Explain the purpose of a social media campaign as a final product.

    • Slide 7. Establish the power of social media.
    • Talking points:
    • Each of us have probably texted a friend or posted something online that was not planned. Maybe you were on a vacation or trip, took a selfie, and posted it.
    • According to one study, 72% of adults in the United States are active on social media. (To learn more, read the Social Media Fact Sheet). Given this fact, communicating through social media platforms has become an effective way to inform others, engage others, and promote change.
    • Slide 8. Define social media campaign.
    • A social media campaign is when a group of people works together to publish planned content using multiple social media platforms, like Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Pinterest, to achieve a goal.
    • Social media campaigns have different goals. Some want to increase followers. Some want to promote an event. Others want to inform a particular audience about a new topic or product.
    • Slide 9. Share more details about the final product.
    • Talking points:
    • You will work collaboratively with your team, throughout this unit, to plan a social media campaign that raises awareness and promotes change on one of three issues impacting young people and communities throughout Washington: tribal-treaty rights, river restoration, and climate change.
    • You will learn about these three enduring issues first, then decide which one you are most interested in focusing your social media campaign on.

    [Slide 10] Introduce the Social Media Campaign Planner.

    • Distribute a copy of the Social Media Campaign Planner to each student, direct students to Part 1 – Engaging Your Local School Board, and review the directions.
    • Open and project the Pew Research Social Media Fact Sheet.
    • Show students the six topics the report has information on.
      • Social media use over time
      • Who uses social media
      • Which social media platforms are most common
      • Who uses each social media platform
      • How often Americans use social media sites?
      • Find out more
    • Explain to students that when they read about apps, platforms, sites, we refer to them as platforms and they all mean the same thing.
    • Give students a few minutes to skim and explore each topic in the report to have them think about what information is available and what information might be most helpful.
    • Ask students:
      • Which topic will have information on the most popular or widely used social media platforms?
    • Response: “Which social media platforms are most common”
    • Navigate to that topic, “Which social media platforms are most common,” in the report and demonstrate hovering your curser over the top line, “YouTube,” and stop on the data point, “February 8, 2021.”
    • Ask: What does this data point indicate?  
      • (That 81% of U.S. adults have used YouTube at some point.)
    • Engage students in making sense of the chart by inviting them to make a claim supported by the data; if needed, use prompts like the following:
      • Which platform has grown the most in popularity over time? (Instagram went from 9% to 40% over the nine-year time span.)
      • Which platforms no longer appear to be increasing in popularity? (WhatsApp, SnapChat, LinkedIn)
    • Prompt students to independently read the chart and create a list of most commonly used social media platforms in Part 1 – Engaging Your Local School Board, then rank order of the platforms by the percentage of the population that uses them.

    [Slide 11] Teams identify which social media platforms they want use to engage board members.

    • Prompt students to reference their Local School Board Research Guide where they created a profile of their school board.
    • Explain to students that they are using the profile they created and the section of the report titled “Who uses each social media platform” to identify which social media platforms they want to use to engage their local school board.
    • Navigate to the section titled, “Who uses each social media platform,” and show students the four tabs to the left.
      • Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn
      • Twitter, Pinterest, Snapchat
      • YouTube, WhatsApp, Reddit
      • TikTok, Nextdoor
    • Explain to the students that they are using the information in the profile of their local school board to identify which social media channel their board members most likely use.
    • Consider doing a think aloud to support student connections and sense making. You might share this example.
      • If you identify your school district as urban, 84% of people who identified as living in urban areas use YouTube. In contrast, only 24% of people who live in urban areas say they use TikTok. Given this information, you might conclude that YouTube is a better channel to post content. However, depending on the age of the school board members, you might want to consider a different channel.
    • Provide teams time to work together to compare the research with their profile and come up with two or more platforms to engage board members.
      • Point out to students that there is a link to an article in their Social Media Campaign Planner, where they can learn more about the different social media platforms.
    • Invite groups to share their findings. As students share, ask probing and clarifying questions as needed.

    Unless otherwise noted, #Rights #Representation #Change by Educurious is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0.

    Lesson 1.3: District Legislators and Social Media

    Module 1 Icon

    Unit Driving Question:

    How can we use social media to engage community members on issues of injustice?

    Module Driving Question:

    What are my rights, and who represents me?

    Learning Targets

    I can:

    • Consider public testimony and practice voting on a proposed bill in a mock legislative meeting.
    • Identify elected district legislators in the community where I live.
    • Determine which social media platforms I will use to engage district legislators.

    Purpose

    In this lesson, you will learn about state representatives elected to serve the people in the county where you live and the issues they care about. First, you will listen to and consider two different perspectives on taxing soda and vote in support or opposition of the proposed bill on sweet beverages. Then, you will identify your state representative and explore the bills they recently sponsored to begin understanding the issues they care about, and how their issues compare to the issues you care about. Finally, you will draw on your research to decide how your social media campaign should engage your state representatives.

    Lesson Steps

    1. Vote on a proposed sweet beverage tax. Learn about one of the primary functions of an elected state representative by listening to testimony on a proposed bill (SB 5371) to tax beverages that have added sugar, like soda. Based on testimony, decide whether or not you would vote in support of this bill.
    2. Research the elected state representatives where you live. Use the District Finder and the District Legislators Research Guide to learn about the people elected to the state House and Senate for the county where you live, their responsibilities, and what issues they care about.
    3. Continue planning your social media campaign. Using your research and the Social Media Fact Sheet, indicate in your Social Media Campaign Planner how you will engage your state representatives on social media.
    Explore More

     

    Teacher Preparation Notes

    Pacing
    Lesson Timing: 50 minutes
    Standards
    E3.6-8.2: Analyze the role of government in the economy of Washington state through taxation, spending, and policy setting in the past and present.
    • CCSS
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.6: Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author's point of view or purpose (e.g., loaded language, inclusion or avoidance of particular facts).CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.3: Delineate a speaker's argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.
    Lesson Resources
    For StudentsFor EducatorsMaterials
    • n/a
    Lesson Overview
    In this lesson, students learn about state representatives elected to serve the people in the county where they live and the issues they care about. First, students listen to and consider two different perspectives on taxing soda and vote in support or opposition of the proposed bill on sweet beverages. Then, students identify their state representative and explore the bills they recently sponsored to begin understanding the issues they care about, and how their issues compare to the issues students care about. Finally, students draw on research to decide how their social media campaign should engage the state representatives.
    Teacher Preparation
    • Step 1: Cue up the testimony. The video features on the website can seem choppy and slow. The best practice for showing the two video clips is to open two tabs in your browser and cue up one video in one tab and one video in the other. Navigating from the transcript timestamps below does not always work.
    • Step 2: Decide if there are other facts you would like to share about the state legislature. This lesson is meant to introduce students to the state legislature and their primary function. You might want to share more information than is included.
    • Step 2: Practice using the district finder. This tool is very intuitive, but requires a full physical address (street name and number, city, state, zip code). Consider having students use the school’s address if you have students in the classroom experiencing homelessness or if students do not know the physical address where they live.

    Lesson Steps in Detail

    Step 1: Vote on a proposed sweet beverage tax(15 min)

    Purpose: Students take on the role of a state representative in a committee hearing where they hear testimony from two people on a bill that would fund public health services and programs by creating a new tax on beverages that have added sugar, like soda. This gives students a window into some of the major responsibilities for an elected state representative and promotes interest in learning more about the people elected to represent the community they live in.

    You might say: The primary responsibility of an elected state representative is to vote on bills and propose bills that advance the interests of their constituents (people who voted for them) and the broader public. To better understand this responsibility, you will listen to public testimony on a proposed sweetened beverage tax, then vote in support of it or in opposition to it.

    [Slide 2] Introduce the Senate Bill, SB 5371, on the sweetened beverage tax.

    • Talking points:
    • Several large cities around the United States have decided to tax sodas, as a way to discourage people from drinking beverages with added sugar. The money raised by these new taxes fund public health programs that increase awareness about the effects of drinking sweetened beverages.
    • Washington is the first state to consider taxing sweetened beverages.
    • The tax is controversial, with people on both sides of the debate.
    • Listen to testimony at a senate committee hearing, consider both sides of the issue, consider the benefits and consequences, and vote whether the state should add a 21-cent tax to each can of soda.

    [Slide 3] Play testimony from the February 22, 2021 Senate Health & Long Term Care Committee.

    • Explain to students that they are hearing testimony from someone who supports the tax and someone who opposes the tax.
    • Invite students to take notes on facts and details presented by each person testifying.
    • Play testimony (16:42–19:25) from Ruch Kapoor of the American Heart Association, who is testifying in support of the tax.
    • Invite students to share the facts they heard and record them on the board or on a piece of chart paper.
    • Play testimony (48:24–50:49) from Samantha Louderback of the Washington Hospitality Association, who is testifying in opposition of the tax.
    • Invite students to share the facts they heard and record them.

    [Slide 4] Discuss SB 5371.

    • Prompt students to turn and talk:
      • Considering the facts and testimony presented and what you know about the community where you live, would you vote in support or opposition to Senate Bill 5371? Why or why not?
    • Invite students to share out with the whole class.
    • Ask: Is there other information you’d like to know before voting on this bill?

    Vote on SB 5371.

    • Explain to students that, in committee meetings like this, it is common for the committee chair to take a voice vote. However, for our purposes, we are doing a head-down, hand-up vote.
    • Prompt students to put their heads down and shut their eyes, then ask who supports the tax. Tally the number of votes, then ask who opposes the tax. Tally the number of votes.
    • Write the vote tally on the board.

    [Slide 5] Debrief the experience. Discuss the following questions:

      • What was challenging about considering multiple perspectives?
      • Were their perspectives you would have liked to hear from that you didn’t?
      • What did you learn about the job of elected state representatives that you didn’t know before?
    Step 2: Research the elected state representatives where you live(20 min)

    Purpose: Students build on their inquiry about the role and function of state representatives from Step 1 and conduct guided research into which elected officials in the legislature represent the community where they live. Students consider what issues those officials care about, and how do those issues compare to the issues they identified in Lesson 1.1?

    [Slide 6] Show a map of the legislative districts.

    • Talking points:
    • The state legislature in Washington is a bicameral body, meaning there are two chambers. One is the senate and one is the house.
    • This map shows the 49 districts that elect members to the house and senate. Each district is made of several counties, cities, and towns.
    • There are 49 members of the senate and 98 members of the house.
    • In order for a bill to become a law, it must be approved by the senate and the house, then signed by the governor.
    • Ask: In which legislative district is our school located?

    [Slide 7] Prepare students for guided research on their district legislators.

    Demonstrate for students how to use the District Finder to locate the information they need. Refer to the How to Navigate the District Finder resource to support your demonstration.

    • Demonstrate how to find the district in which the school is located.
    • Demonstrate how to find biographic information for each legislator.
    • Demonstrate how to find the bill’s sponsors.

    Provide students time to engage in research.

    • Use the How to Navigate the District Finder resource and the District Finder to support student research.

    [Slide 8] Facilitate small group and whole-class reflection and discussion on their research. When students have completed their research, ask the following questions:

    • How are issues prioritized by your district legislators similar and different from the issues you identified in the first lesson of this unit?
      • Reference the class Know & Need to Know chart.
    • Based on your research, what issues do you think state legislatures have the authority to address?
    • What kind of issues do you think are beyond a state legislatures control?
    Step 3: Continue planning your social media campaign(15 min)

    Purpose: Students reconvene with their social media campaign teams and explore different ways they can engage their district legislators in their social media campaign. Students have not yet identified their issue, which happens in Module 2. By the end of Step 3, students have learned who their district legislators are, what authority they have, and the different ways they can engage them on social media.

    [Slide 9] Teams identify which social media platforms they want to use to engage state legislators.

    • Organize students into their social media campaign teams.
    • Explain to students that they are using the profile they created in their District Legislators Research Guide and the section of the Social Media Fact Sheet titled “Who uses each social media platform” to identify which social media platforms they want to use to engage their district legislators.
    • Navigate to the section titled “Who uses each social media platform” and review the four tabs to the left with the students.
      • Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn
      • Twitter, Pinterest, Snapchat
      • YouTube, WhatsApp, Reddit
      • TikTok, Nextdoor
    • Remind students that they are using the information in the profile of their district legislators to identify which social media platforms their legislators are most likely to use.
    • Provide teams time to work together to compare their research with the profile they created in order to come up with two or more platforms with which to engage district legislators.
      • Remind students that there is a link to an article in their Social Media Campaign Planner where they can learn more about the different social media platforms.
    • Invite groups to share their findings. As students share, ask probing and clarifying questions as needed.

    Unless otherwise noted, #Rights #Representation #Change by Educurious is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0.

    Lesson 1.4: Case Study Assignments

    Module 1 Icon

    Unit Driving Question:

    How can we use social media to engage community members on issues of injustice?

    Module Driving Question:

    What are my rights, and who represents me?

    Learning Targets

    I can:

    • Examine content posted on social media platforms for key facts and details about issues impacting people in the state.
    • Identify hashtags, tags, and content people use to communicate about issues.
    • Determine how many times district legislators have sponsored or co-sponsored bills in support of natural resources, the environment, and hazard preparedness.

    Purpose

    In today’s lesson, you will examine posts and content on various social media platforms about three issues (natural resources, the environment, and hazard preparedness). Then, you will go back to your district legislators profile pages from the previous lesson to determine how many bills the legislators sponsored or co-sponsored that, in some way, support these three issues. Lastly, you will meet your social media campaign team and be assigned a case study that will inform your social media campaign planning.

    Lesson Steps

    1. Learn about three key issues in Washington. In small groups and using the Social Media Analysis, organize social media posts by issue and analyze them for key facts, as well as details, content, hashtags and tags, and purpose.
    2. Determine which of these issues your legislators supported. Using what you have learned about three issues, go back to the three district legislator homepages using the District Finder. Review the bills they sponsored and co-sponsored over the last 1–3 years and identify the number of times they supported each of these issues through a bill. Record your findings in Part 4 of your Social Media Campaign Planner.
    3. Receive your case-study assignment. Highlight the case study you are assigned in Part 5 of your planner. Read the “A Brief History” section in your case study and work with your social media team to brainstorm possible goals for your campaign. Record your ideas in Part 6 of your planner.
    Case Studies

    Teacher Preparation Notes

    Pacing
    Lesson Timing:70 minutes
    Standards
    SSS3.6-8.1: Engage in discussion, analyzing multiple view- points on public issues. G2.6-8.3: Explain and analyze how the environment has affected people and how human actions modify the physical environment, and in turn, how the physical environment limits or promotes human activities in Washington state in the past or present. 
    • CCSS
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.1: Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sourcesCCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.2: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.
    Lesson Resources
    For StudentsFor EducatorsMaterials
    • n/a
    Lesson Overview
    In today’s lesson, students examine posts and content on various social media platforms about three issues (natural resources, the environment, and hazard preparedness). Then, they go back to their district legislators profile pages from the previous lesson to determine how many bills the legislators sponsored or co-sponsored that, in some way, support these three issues. Lastly, students meet their social media campaign team and are assigned a case study that informs their social media campaign planning.
    Teacher Preparation
    • Step 1. Familiarize yourself with the talking points. Consider adding additional facts and details about each of the issues from your local context. Consider reaching out to members of the tribe(s) in your community to help you understand these issues in your local context.
    • Step 2. Determine how you will group students. Students should be in groups of three for this step. Ideally, they are working with people who are not on their social media campaign team.
    • Step 3. Determine case-study assignments. This is an opportunity for student voice and choice. Consider inviting groups to rank order the issues they would like to study by level of interest, or you can randomly assign case studies. Students use what they learned in their case study to plan a social media campaign on the case study’s issue.
    • Step 3. Read the first section of each case study. Identify words that might be unfamiliar or challenging. Consider pre-teaching certain vocabulary. Consider additional supports students might need to access the text and aid in comprehension.

    Lesson Steps in Detail

    Step 1: Learn about three key issues in Washington(30 min)

    Purpose: Students read and sort of social media posts by issue. This provides students with some initial facts and details about each of the issues they are learning about in this unit, which supports their social media campaign planning.

    You might say: Begin learning about three key issues in Washington—natural resources, the environment, and hazard preparedness—by reviewing social media posts about these key issues by different people and organizations.

    [Slides 2–4] Introduce the three issues students are addressing in their social media campaigns.

    • Slide 2. Tribal-Treaty Rights & Natural Resource Management.
    • Talking points:
      • “As the salmon disappear, so do our cultures and treaty rights. We are at a crossroads, and we are running out of time.”
    • To learn more, read: "We need to win the battle for salmon recovery."
      • These are the words of the late tribal leader, Billy Frank Jr.
      • Tribal-treaty rights have long been recognized and they have long been ignored.
      • Today, you will learn about rights that tribes have and their leadership in helping people in the state better manage its natural resources.
    • Slide 3. River Reclamation & the Environment.
    • Talking points:
      • The Duwamish River that runs through Seattle is one of the most endangered rivers in the United States, according to the American Rivers organization.
      • According the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the river is so polluted that it is unsafe to eat shellfish and fish that live in the river. Repeated exposure to the polluted water and sediment in the river increases a person’s chance of cancer.
      • It is estimated that 500,000 people live within the basin or watershed of the Duwamish River.
      • Today, you will learn more about the Duwamish River and the actions people, communities, tribes, and governments are taking to restore the river.
    • Slide 4. Preparing for Extreme Weather & Natural Hazards.

    [Slide 5] Facilitate student analysis and discussion on social media posts about these three issues.

    • Organize students into groups of three or four. For the sake of variety and engagement, consider having students work with students who are not in their social media campaign team.
    • Distribute a copy of the Social Media Analysis group slide deck to each group and review the directions.
      • Step 1: Review different posts and links.
      • Step 2: Group posts (Slides 6–14) under their related issue analysis. If you think a slide belongs to multiple issues, make a copy of it and group it under all related issues.
      • Step 3: Analyze groups of posts for key facts and details about the issue and problem, types of content, hashtags and tags, and purpose. Record your notes on Slides 3, 4, and 5. Be ready to share your findings with the class.
    • Model how to move slides and manipulate the slide deck to complete Step 2.
    • Consider doing a think-aloud of analyzing one of the posts for each of the questions/prompts at the top of the four columns. Use the Social Media Analysis Teacher Key to support your think-aloud.
    • Provide students time to work collaboratively and use the Social Media Analysis Teacher Key to support student analysis.
    • Invite groups to share out their findings and update the class Know & Need to Know chart from Lesson 1.1 as appropriate, or consider creating a Know & Need to Know chart for each issue.
      • For the latter, consider using the same chart for each issue across classes to support your materials management.
    Step 2: Determine which of these issues your legislators supported(15 min)

    Purpose: Students use what they have learned so far about each of the key issues and return to their district legislators’ bill sponsor and co-sponsor records to determine to what extent they have supported or opposed any key issues in the past. This helps students better understand how to engage their legislators in their social media campaigns.

    You might say: Use what you have learned about the key issues to research the records of district legislators in the community where you live, to determine the extent to which local elected officials have supported these key issues in the past.               

    [Slide 6] Prepare students to analyze their district legislators’ bill records on these key issues.

    • Prompt students to return to their Social Media Campaign Planner, and direct them to Part 4.
    • Project the planner on the screen and review the directions.
      • Identify the number of bills each of your district legislators have sponsored or co-sponsored, in the last 1–3 years, that support or oppose the key issues you studied today—natural resources, the environment, and hazard preparedness.

    Review with students how to find their district legislators’ records.

    • Use the How to Navigate the District Finder slide deck from Lesson 1.3 to review with students how to find their legislators and their bill sponsorship and co-sponsorship records.
    • Have students complete Part 4 independently, but work with their groups if they have questions.

    [Slide 7] Facilitate a share-out on their findings.

    • Invite students to share out their findings with the whole class.
    • Record on the board the number of bills that district legislators supported on each issue.
    • Ask: Did the findings surprise you, or were they what you expected? Why?
    Step 3: Receive your case-study assignment(25 min)

    Purpose: Students are organized into their social media campaign teams to receive the case study they are working with in Module 2. There are three case studies, each relating to one of the key issues the students learned about today. This is also where you introduce students to the Navigating Text framework for the first time in this unit.

    You might say: Throughout this project, one of the important ways we will learn about key issues is by reading texts. Some will be primary sources and others, like the case studies we are reading today, will be secondary sources. I’d like to introduce you to the way we’ll approach learning from texts, and then each of your teams will try it out as you read a case study about one of the issues we studied today.

    [Slide 8] Assign teams their case studies.

    • Organize students into their social media campaign teams.
    • Assign and distribute case studies, then have students highlight in Part 5 of their Social Media Campaign Planner which case study they have been assigned.
    • Explain to students that the issue their case study is focused on is the same issue as their social media campaign focus.

    [Slide 9] Introduce the Navigating Text approach as illustrated on the slide.

    You might say: Throughout this project, one of the important ways we will learn about Washington history is by reading texts. Some are primary sources and others, like sections of case studies we’ll read today, are secondary sources. I’d like to introduce you to the way we’ll approach learning from texts, and then we’ll try it out with your assigned case studies.

    Walk students through the Navigating Text approach: Tell students that we can approach learning from text like a wayfinder approaches going on a journey. Ask students what they know about wayfinders (see the Teacher Tip for more information) and what they think needs to happen before wayfinders begin a journey. What do they do while they are journeying? And what happens when they arrive at their destination? Elicit ideas and review each step of the three-part approach:

    • Set a Navigation Plan: The teacher prepares students to read.
    • Stay on course: Students engage in active sensemaking as they read and take notes with a partner.
    • Arrive, unpack, and share: Students reflect on what they have read and apply what they learned to the project.

    You might say: A Navigation Plan helps wayfinders get where they are going. What do you think a Navigation Plan includes? [elicit ideas]

    Wayfinders need navigation skills, or they will certainly get lost! We are going to think about reading the same way wayfinders think about going on a voyage. A good Navigation Plan for reading means we have a clear purpose in mind. We know where we are going and why it matters for our project.

    Then, we need to “map our course,” or figure out how we are going to reach our destination. Just as wayfinders prepare to navigate through unfamiliar places, we’ll take a look at the text to see if anything ahead looks tricky or challenging.

    Wayfinders use their knowledge of the environment (such as stars, waves, and the flight patterns of birds) and special tools like maps and compasses. We’ll also make sure we have the right tools for reading, like graphic organizers or sticky notes.

    We’ll pack what I like to call our “Survival Kit.” A wayfinder’s Survival Kit might contain things like a fire starter, extra food, and other essentials to use in unexpected conditions. In our case, we’ll need a set of strategies for when we get lost in a text or stumble on words or ideas we don’t know.

    Wayfinders often work as a team. We’ll also gather a team, finding partners to read and talk with.

    While we are reading, just like wayfinders are constantly checking their maps and using their tools to stay on course, we’ll keep our purpose for reading in mind so we stay focused on the project goals. We’ll work with our teammates to read and make sense of texts, and we’ll use our Survival Kits if we have any trouble.

    At the end of a journey, wayfinders arrive at their destination, unpack their gear, and share their experiences. For us, arriving at the end of a text means that we’ll make sense of what we learned and apply it to our project work.

    Let’s try this out as we read our case studies.

    [Slide 10] Set a Navigation Plan for reading “A Brief History” in each case study.

    • Review the reading purpose for each case study:
      • Case study 1: Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission
    • Read to learn about the history of tribal fishing rights, how tribes continue to fight for these rights, and how the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission supports the tribes.
      • Case study 2: Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition
    • Read to learn about how the Duwamish River became polluted, what it means to be a Superfund Site, and how the Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition fights for environmental justice on behalf of the people who live near and use the river.
      • Case study 3: City of Seattle Office of Emergency Management
    • Read to learn about the natural hazards facing Seattle, including extreme weather events and earthquakes, and how the city’s Office of Emergency Management prepares for them.
    • Map our course: Prompt students to scan the article’s structure, noting its length, section headers, and vocabulary support.
      • Have students identify the title and ask them what they already know about the focus of their case study and what questions they might have about them.
      • Ask students to identify anything that looks difficult and address any immediate concerns or questions.
    • Identify tools: Explain that students should use the annotation system they might have used before as they identify evidence that supports the purpose for reading. Remind students of the following symbols:
      • ü = information that supports the purpose for reading (add summarizing notes)
      • ? = anything confusing (words, phrases, sentences)
    • Prepare the Survival Kit: Review the following strategies that help students if they get stuck:
      • Lost or confused? Reread, read on, stop and clarify, ask for help, or review the purpose for reading.
      • Stuck on unfamiliar words or ideas? Break down complex words, phrases, or paragraphs.
      • Need more help or information? Use all text features, such as graphics, captions, or defined vocabulary words for support.
    • Prompt teams to read only the first section of their article aloud. Explain that they read sections 2 and 3 in an upcoming lesson.

    Stay on course.

    • Circulate the room as teams are reading. As you circulate, check student progress through the articles by noting their strategies and process.
    • When appropriate, support students in clarifying confusing sections (marked with a question mark).
    • Periodically ask students in each group to explain why and where they used check marks—and how the information they marked relates to the reading purpose.

    [Slide 10] Have students discuss the problem their case study highlights.

    • As teams finish reading section 1 of their case study, post the following prompts:
      • What problem or problems does the case study highlight?
      • List 1–2 questions you have about the problem or problems.
    • Prompt teams to discuss and respond to the two prompts when they have finished reading.
    • Invite students to share out their responses.
    • Add to the class Know & Need to Know chart as appropriate.

    [Slide 11] Facilitate team brainstorming on possible goals for their social media campaign.

    • Prompt students to Part 6 of their Social Media Campaign Planner and review the directions.
      • After you have read section 1 of your case study, brainstorm ideas for how your social media campaign team can address the problem. Be creative and think outside of the box! If need be, look back at the Social Media Analysis activity for inspiration and ideas.
    • Give students a moment to independently brainstorm and write down their ideas before they brainstorm as a team.
    • Invite teams to share out their ideas with the whole class.

    [Slide 12] Facilitate a reflection and discussion on the Module 1 Driving Question: What are my rights, and who represents me?

    • Explain to students that, during this module, they have reflected on their rights and the issues they care about, learned about the responsibilities that local and state-level elected officials have to voters, and explored three issues that are critically important to the future of Washington.
    • Have students turn and talk:
      • Are young people represented in local school boards and the state legislature? Explain.
      • Do elected legislators in your district support three issues critical to Washington’s future? Explain.
    • Invite students to share out their response with the whole class and share any helpful framing as students conclude Module 1.

    Unless otherwise noted, #Rights #Representation #Change by Educurious is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0.

    Module 2: Issues and Opportunities

    Module Overviewicon

    Module 2: Issues and Opportunities

    #Rights #Representation #Change

    Unit Driving Question

    How can we use social media to engage community members on issues of injustice?

    Module Driving Question

    How have people identified problems and responded to them?

     

    Module Overview

    In this module, students continue to learn about their assigned issue (natural resources, the environment, or hazard preparedness) through reading their case study and conducting research. In the first lesson, students learn about how people are addressing some of the problems in their case studies by listening to first-hand accounts and research what educational materials exist that they can pull into their social media campaign to educate people about the problem. In the second lesson, students analyze social media posts from the organization in their case study, or similar organizations, to learn about how people are taking informed action and advocating for solutions that address the problem or problems they are studying. Then, students research what actions and advocacy materials they can highlight in their social media campaign that encourage and move people from learning about a problem to wanting to do something about a problem. In the third and final lesson of this module, students analyze a social media feed (i.e., a sequence of posts) from the focal organization of their case study to seek to understand how a menu of planned content can help them achieve a specific goal. Students conclude this module by applying what they have learned to create a detailed social media campaign plan that uses content and social media strategies to achieve a specific goal and affect change on the problem or problems they have been studying.

    Lesson 2.1: Organizing and Educating (60 minutes)

    Learning Targets

    I can:

    • Listen to first-hand accounts of how people are addressing problems impacting the state.
    • Read my case study for key facts and details about what led people to recognize there was a problem and how people responded.
    • Research educational materials that can help me educate others about the problem highlighted in my case study.
    In this lesson, students hear from people who recognized problems with the management of natural resources, the environment, or hazard preparedness and took informed actions. Then, students read more from their assigned case study to learn how groups of people worked together to respond to the issue. Finally, students use what they have learned to research educational materials they can share in their social media campaign to help others learn about the problem.
    Lesson 2.2: Action and Advocacy (55 minutes)

    Learning Targets

    I can:

    • Analyze social media posts for evidence of advocacy and action.
    • Define taking informed action and advocating in my own words.
    • Read my case study for key facts and details about action and advocacy on my issue.
    • Research actions and advocacy that I can share with others in my social media campaign to help mobilize them around my issue.
    In this lesson, students learn about how people and organizations have taken informed action and supported public policy through advocacy. First, students study and sort social media posts into two categories, action and advocacy. This helps them build understanding of these two ideas and define them in their own words. Second, students read the “Informed Action and Advocacy” section in their case study to learn about actions and advocacy people have taken on the problem they have been studying throughout this unit. Lastly, students use this new understanding to help identify actions and advocacy they can share through their social media campaign to encourage people to move beyond learning about an issue, to supporting an issue.
    Lesson 2.3: Design Your Social Media Campaign (140 minutes)

    Learning Targets

    I can:

    • Analyze a group’s social media feed for evidence that it is accomplishing a specific goal.
    • Identify the goal of my team’s weeklong social media campaign.
    • Use notes in my Social Media Campaign Planner to design a campaign that educates others, encourages informed action, and advocates for a change.
    In this lesson, students move from the research and planning phase of their social media campaign to the design phase. Social media teams identify the target audience, focus, and goal of their social media campaign. Then, they explore and discuss why organic content on a social media feed is not always enough, and that planning out a menu of content, over time, on education, taking informed action, and advocacy can help achieve specific goals. Finally, students draw on what they have learned throughout this unit to work with their social media team to design a campaign that helps them achieve their goal.
    Module Assessments
    • Lesson 2.1: Social Media Campaign Planner
    • Lesson 2.2: Action and Advocacy Sort, Social Media Campaign Rubric
    • Lesson 2.3: Social Media Campaign Plan
    Vocabulary
    • advocate: to publicly support a cause or policy
    • hashtag: a clickable word or phrase that helps you categorize your post by topic and allows you to see content you “like”
    • tag: clickable name associated with a profile on a social media platform
    • taking informed action: individuals or groups of people taking action to address a social or political question, following a process of inquiry, analysis, reflection, and decision-making
    • S.M.A.R.T.: specific, measurable, actionable, realistic, and time-bound

    Unless otherwise noted, #Rights #Representation #Change by Educurious is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0.

    Lesson 2.1: Organizing and Educating

    Module 2 Icon

     

    Unit Driving Question:

    How can we use social media to engage community members on issues of injustice?

    Module Driving Question:

    How have people identified problems and responded to them?

    Learning Targets

    I can:

    • Listen to first-hand accounts of how people are addressing   problems impacting the state.
    • Read my case study for key facts and details about what led people to recognize there was a problem and how people   responded.
    • Research educational materials that can help me educate others about the problem highlighted in my case study.

    Purpose

    In this lesson, you will hear from people who recognized problems with the management of natural resources, the environment, or hazard preparedness and took informed actions. Then, you will read more from your assigned case study to learn how groups of people worked together to respond to the issue. Finally, you will use what you have learned to research educational materials you can share in your social media campaign to help others learn about the problem. 

    Lesson Steps

    1. Listen to first-hand accounts. Using Part 7 of your Social Media Campaign Planner, listen to a first-hand account about how the problem you are studying has been addressed by people, organizations, and governments working together. Discuss what motivated people to act and what information they want others to know about their work.
    2. Read the “About the Organization” section of your case study. Learn when people first recognized there was a problem and how the NWICF, DRCC, or City of Seattle first responded to the problem.
    3. Research educational content for your social media campaign. Identify resources on the NWICF, DRCC, and City of Seattle websites that you can share with people in your social media campaign to help raise awareness.
    First-hand Accounts:

    Teacher Preparation Notes

    Pacing
    Lesson Timing:55 minutes
    Standards
    H.4.6-8.2: Analyze how a historical event in Washington state history helps us to understand contemporary issues and events.
    • CCSS
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.9: Analyze the relationship between a primary and secondary source on the same topic.CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.7: Conduct short research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question), drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration.
    Lesson Resources
    For StudentsFor EducatorsMaterials
    • n/a
    Lesson Overview
    In this lesson, students hear from people who recognized problems with the management of natural resources, the environment, or hazard preparedness and took informed actions. Then, students read more from their assigned case study to learn how groups of people worked together to respond to the issue. Finally, students use what they have learned to research educational materials they can share in their social media campaign to help others learn about the problem.
    Teacher Preparation
    • Step 2. Read the second section (“About the Organization”) of each case study. Identify words that might be unfamiliar or challenging. Consider pre-teaching certain vocabulary. Consider additional support students might need to access the text and aid in comprehension.

    Lesson Steps in Detail

    Step 1: Listen to first-hand accounts(15 min)

    Purpose: Students begin this lesson by listening to people who are on the front lines addressing one or many problems highlighted in their assigned case study. This humanizes the issue and helps students deepen their understanding about the problem and what can be done about it.

    You might say: Today, you will hear from three people who have been hard at work on the key issues you are studying. They will share about their experience and what people can do to help address a problem or problems.

    [Slides 2–3] Prepare students to listen to first-hand accounts of people working on the issues and problems they are learning about.

    • Slide 2. Explain to students that they have the opportunity to learn more about the issue their case study is focused on by hearing from someone who is working to address the problems associated with their issue.
    • Prompt students to navigate to Part 7 of their Social Media Campaign Planner and review the directions.
      • Listen to first-hand accounts of people working with others to address one of the three issues you learned about in the first section of your case study. As you listen, take notes on why they have chosen to work on the issue, what problem they are addressing, and what steps they are taking to address the problem.
    • Introduce the people.
      • Lorraine Loomis was the Swinomish tribe’s fisheries manager and chaired the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission. Prompt those reading the NWIFC case study to listen to Lorraine’s story. (For more about Lorraine Loomis’ story, read: NWIFC Chairperson Lorraine Loomis Walks On)
      • Alberto Rodriguez was the outreach coordinator for the Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition. Prompt students reading the DRCC case study to listen to Alberto’s story.
      • Ryan Wilkes is a YouTuber who lives in an earthquake zone in California. He shares information about how to prepare for an earthquake by preparing an earthquake emergency kit. Prompt students reading the City of Seattle Office of Emergency Management case study to listen to Ryan’s story.
    • Slide 3. Review the guiding questions students take notes on while watching their video.
      • What is the issue?
      • Why has this person or group decided to work on this issue?
      • What problem are they addressing?
      • What steps have they taken to address the problem?
      • What can other people do to help?
    • Set up three stations in different corners of the room with a laptop and one of the three videos cued to play on each.
    • Prompt students to gather with other students assigned the same case study to watch and discuss the video.

    Students watch, take notes on, and discuss the video that supports their case study.

    • Have students start their videos at the same time, as they are similar in length.
    • Encourage students to take notes while the videos are playing.
    • When the videos have ended, prompt groups to discuss and record their answers on the five guiding questions.

    [Slide 4] Facilitate a reflection and share out on student inquiry.

    • Ask: If this person or group were here today, what follow-up questions would you want to ask them about the issue/problem you are studying?
    • Invite students to share out their questions.
    Step 2: Read the “About the Organization” section of your case study(15 min)

    Purpose: Previously, students learned about the problem they are studying in their case study. Now, they learn about people and communities who organized and are working together to address the problem; this primes students to consider what information they want to share about the organization’s work in their social media campaign.

    [Slide 5] Set a navigation plan for reading Section 2 (“About the Organization”) of the case studies.

    • Review the reading purpose for each case study:
      • Case study 1: Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission
    • Read to learn about the history of tribal fishing rights, how tribes continue to fight for these rights, and how the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission supports the tribes.
      • Case study 2: Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition
    • Read to learn about how the Duwamish River became polluted, what it means to be a Superfund Site, and how the Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition fights for environmental justice on behalf of the people who live near and use the river.
      • Case study 3: City of Seattle Office of Emergency Management
    • Read to learn about the natural hazards facing Seattle, including extreme weather events and earthquakes, and how the City of Seattle Office of Emergency Management prepares for them.
    • Map our course: Prompt students to scan the case studies structure, noting its length, section headers, and vocabulary support.
      • Ask students to identify anything that looks difficult and address any immediate concerns or questions.
    • Identify tools: Explain that students should use the annotation system they might have used before as they identify evidence that supports the purpose for reading. Remind students of the following symbols:
      • ü = information that supports the purpose for reading (add summarizing notes)
      • ? = anything confusing (words, phrases, sentences)
    • Prepare the Survival Kit: Review the following strategies that help students if they get stuck:
      • Lost or confused? Reread, read on, stop and clarify, ask for help, or review the purpose for reading.
      • Stuck on unfamiliar words or ideas? Break down complex words, phrases, or paragraphs.
    • Need more help or information? Use all text features, such as graphics, captions, or defined vocabulary words for support.
    • Provide time for students to read and annotate Section 2 of their case study.

    Stay on course.

    • As you circulate, check on how students are progressing through the case studies by noting where they are annotating.
    • When appropriate, support students in clarifying confusing sections (marked with a question mark).
    • Periodically ask students in each group to explain why and where they used check marks—and how the information they marked relates to the reading purpose.

    [Slide 6] Have students discuss the problem their case study highlights.

    • As teams finish reading Section 2 of their case study, post the following prompts:
      • What event or events contributed to the start of the organization?
      • List 1–2 questions you have about the organization.
    • Prompt teams to discuss and respond to the two prompts when they have finished reading.
    • Invite students to share out their responses.
    • Add to the class Know & Need to Know chart as appropriate.
    Step 3: Research educational content for your social media campaign(25 min)

    Purpose: Students think about the content they have engaged throughout this unit, including social media posts, videos of first-hand accounts, and case studies. Then, they look at the website of the group their case study is focused on to identify content they can use to educate others about the issue there are studying.

    You might say: Learn about the different ways in which the group your case study is focused on educates the public, encourages others to take informed action, and advocates for change. You will use some of the content you identify today in your team’s social media campaign.

    Review examples of content that can be used in social media campaigns.

    • Use the Social Media Analysis Teacher Key from Lesson 1.4 to review with students the different types of content they can post in their social media campaigns. Highlight the following content.
      • Articles
      • Videos
      • Online games
      • Websites
      • Fundraising pages
      • Interactive maps
    • Explain to students that each case study is focused on a particular group, and that each group has a website with content.
    • Project websites one at a time and spotlight one resource so students begin to understand how to navigate each site.
      • For the NWIFC case study, navigate to https://nwifc.org.
        • Click on the left-hand tab “Northwest Treaty-Tribes Magazine.”
        • Click on “Summer 2021 Magazine.”
        • Scroll down so students can see the various articles, topics, and images.
      • For the DRCC case study, navigate to www.duwamishcleanup.org.
        • Click on the “News & Events” tab at the top.
        • Scroll down so students can see the various articles, topics, videos, and interviews.
      • For the City of Seattle case study, navigate to https://www.seattle.gov.
        • Navigate to the “Menu” tab at the top right.
        • Click on “Departments.”
        • Scroll down and click on “Emergency Management.”
        • Click on the yellow box marked “Hazard Explorer.”
        • Point out the various hazards.
        • Encourage students to explore this tool for content and other tabs and resources on the City of Seattle Office of Emergency Management webpage.

    [Slide 7] Focus and support student research.

    • Prompt students to navigate to Part 8 of their Social Media Campaign Planner and review the directions.
      • Part 8: Using the website of the group you are learning about in your case study, identify content you can use in your social media campaign to raise awareness about the issue and educate others. Working with your team, identify at least one piece of content for each category below. There are two blank rows for content you find that is from a category of content not listed.
    • Encourage students to work together on this task. For example, each person in the team can look for content for 2–3 categories. Then, students can share out their findings.
    • Actively monitor student research and support students who have less experience with independent online research.

    [Slide 8] Facilitate a reflection of online research.

    • Have students turn and talk:
      • What piece of content are you most excited about including in your social media campaign? And why?
    • Invite students to share their reflections with the whole class.

    Unless otherwise noted, #Rights #Representation #Change by Educurious is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0.

    Lesson 2.2: Action and Advocacy

    Icon

    Unit Driving Question:

    How can we use social media to engage community members on issues of injustice?

    Module Driving Question:

    How have people identified problems and responded to them?

    Learning Targets

    I can:

    • Analyze social media posts for evidence of advocacy and action.
    • Define taking informed action and advocating in my own words.
    • Read my case study for key facts and details about action and advocacy on my issue.
    • Research actions and advocacy that I can share with others in my social media campaign to help mobilize them around my issue.

    Purpose

    In this lesson, you will learn about how people and organizations have taken informed action and supported public policy through advocacy. First, you will study and sort social media posts into two categories, action and advocacy. This will help you build understanding of these two ideas and define them in your own words. Second, you will read the “Action and Advocacy” section in your case study to learn about actions and advocacy people have taken on the problem you have been studying throughout this unit. Lastly, you will use this new understanding to help identify actions and advocacy you can share through your social media campaign to encourage people to move beyond learning about an issue, to supporting an issue.

    Lesson Steps

    1. Analyze social media posts for action and advocacy. Use the Action and Advocacy Sort slide deck to review social media posts on three issues you and your classmates have been studying this unit. Analyze the posts for evidence of action and advocacy. Using your analysis and discussion, define action and advocacy in your own words.
    2. Read the “Action and Advocacy” section of your case study. Learn about what action and advocacy people have taken at the organization you are studying, as well as how action and advocacy is shared on social media.
    3. Research action and advocacy content for your social media campaign. Identify resources on the NWICF, DRCC, and City of Seattle websites that you can share with people in your social media campaign about action and advocacy, as well as how they might get involved.
    Explore More

    Teacher Preparation Notes

    Pacing
    Lesson Timing:55 minutes
    Standards
    H4.6-8.2: Analyze how a historical event in Washington state history helps us to understand contemporary issues and events.
    • CCSS
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.9: Analyze the relationship between a primary and secondary source on the same topic.CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.7: Conduct short research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question), drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration.
    Lesson Resources
    For StudentsFor EducatorsMaterials
    • n/a
    Lesson Overview
    In this lesson, students learn about how people and organizations have taken informed action and supported public policy through advocacy. First, students study and sort social media posts into two categories, action and advocacy. This helps them build understanding of these two ideas and define them in their own words. Second, students read the “Action and Advocacy” section in their case study to learn about actions and advocacy people have taken on the problem they have been studying throughout this unit. Lastly, students use this new understanding to help identify actions and advocacy they can share through their social media campaign to encourage people to move beyond learning about an issue, to supporting an issue.
    Teacher Preparation
    Step 2. Read the “Action and Advocacy” section of each case study. Identify words that might be unfamiliar or challenging. Consider pre-teaching certain vocabulary. Consider additional support students might need to access the text and aid in comprehension.

    Lesson Steps in Detail

    Step 1: Analyze social media posts for action and advocacy(10 min)

    Purpose: Students work in their social media campaign teams to evaluate social media posts and categorize them as action or advocacy. This helps students consider what content they can post in their social media campaigns that move people beyond learning about an issue to doing something about an issue.

    You might say: Today, you will work in your teams to evaluate social media posts on the three key issues (natural resources, the environment, and hazards preparedness) for evidence of action and advocacy. This will help you understand what content you can post that can inspire and encourage people to take informed action and advocate for an issue.

    [Slides 2–5] Introduce students to the idea of social media content that is focused on action and advocacy.

    • Organize students into their social media campaign teams.
    • Slide 2. Distribute one copy of Action and Advocacy Sort to each team in the form of a collaborative document (e.g., a Google Slide Deck) and review the directions.
      • Step 1: Define “Taking Informed Action” and “Advocating” in your own words.
      • Step 2: Review the posts.
      • Step 3: Group posts (Slides 4–9) in two categories, “Taking Informed Action” and “Advocating.” If you think a post belongs in both categories, make a copy of it and group it under both categories.
    • Slide 3. Facilitate a small group discussion on key terms.
      • Give teams time to define the terms in their own words, then invite them to share their definitions with the whole class.
      • Slide 4. Taking Informed Action
    • Possible response: Individuals or groups of people taking action to address a social or political question, following a process of inquiry, analysis, reflection, and decision-making
      • Slide 5. Advocating
    • Possible response: Publicly supporting a cause or policy.
    • Consider adding these terms to your classroom word wall.
    • Consider modeling how to move slides and reorder them, then release teams to complete the sort.
    • Use the Action and Advocacy Sort Teacher Key to monitor and support team progress on the task.
    • When teams are finished, invite a team to share out the correct groupings.
    Teacher Tip: Developing a Word WallAs the class builds out vocabulary on the wall, you can give students opportunities to interact with the words by grouping them into categories or placing them in opposition to one another. The following resources may be helpful for developing your Word Wall.
    Step 2: Read the “Action and Advocacy” section of your case study(20 min)

    Purpose: Students read section 3 of their case study. In section 2, they learned about people and communities who organized and were working together to address a problem or set of problems. In this final section of the case study, students learn about specific actions and advocacy taken to directly address the problem or set of problems. This helps students consider what content they can post in their social media campaigns that move people from learning about an issue to doing something about an issue.

    [Slide 6] Set a navigation plan for reading Section 3, “Action and Advocacy" of the case studies.

      • Case study 1: Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission
    • Read to learn about the history of tribal fishing rights, how tribes continue to fight for these rights, and how the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission supports the tribes.
      • Case study 2: Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition
    • Read to learn about how the Duwamish River became polluted, what it means to be a Superfund Site, and how the Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition fights for environmental justice on behalf of the people who live near and use the river.
      • Case study 3: City of Seattle Office of Emergency Management
        • Read to learn about the natural hazards facing Seattle, including extreme weather events and earthquakes, and how the City of Seattle Office of Emergency Management prepares for them.
    • Map our course: Prompt students to scan the article’s structure, noting its length, section headers, and vocabulary support.
      • Ask students to identify anything that looks difficult and address any immediate concerns or questions.
    • Identify tools: Explain that students should use the annotation system they might have used before as they identify evidence that supports the purpose for reading. Remind students of the following symbols:
      • ü = information that supports the purpose for reading (add summarizing notes)
      • ? = anything confusing (words, phrases, sentences)
    • Prepare the Survival Kit: Review the following strategies that help students if they get stuck:
      • Lost or confused? Reread, read on, stop and clarify, ask for help, or review the purpose for reading.
      • Stuck on unfamiliar words or ideas? Break down complex words, phrases, or paragraphs.
    • Need more help or information? Use all text features, such as graphics, captions, or defined vocabulary words for support.
    • Provide time for students to read and annotate section 3 of their case study.

    Stay on course.

    • As you circulate, check on how students are progressing through the case studies by noting where they are annotating.
    • When appropriate, support students in clarifying confusing sections (marked with a question mark).
    • Periodically ask students in each group to explain why and where they used check marks—and how the information they marked relates to the reading purpose.

    [Slide 7] Have students discuss the problem their case study highlights.

    • As teams finish reading Section 3 of their case study, post the following prompts:
      • How has the organization in your case study addressed the problem or problems you are studying?
      • What further actions could the organization take to address the problem or problems?
      • List 1–2 questions you have about their action and advocacy work.
    • Prompt teams to discuss and respond to the three prompts when they have finished reading.
    • Invite students to share out their responses.
    • Add to the class Know & Need to Know chart as appropriate.
    Step 3: Research action and advocacy content for your social media campaign(25 min)

    Purpose: Students go beyond thinking about what content people need to begin understanding an issue and work toward what content people need in order to take informed actions and advocate in ways that cause real change. Teams identify content they can use in their social media campaign that highlight informed actions people are taking, actions people can take, and advocacy work people are doing and can do.

    [Slide 8] Review types of content that can be used in social media campaigns to show action and advocacy, and encourage it.

    • Articles
    • Videos
    • Online games
    • Websites
    • Fundraising pages
    • Hashtags

    [Slide 9] Remind students that each case study is focused on a particular group, and that each group has a website with content.

    [Slide 10] Focus and support student research.

    • Prompt students to navigate to Part 9 of their Social Media Campaign Planner and review the directions.
      • Part 9: Using the website of the group you are studying in your case study, identify content you can use in your social media campaign to raise awareness about the issue and educate others. Working with your team, identify at least one piece of content for each category below. There are two blank rows for content you find that is from a category of content not listed here.

    [Slide 11] Facilitate a reflection of student research.

    • Distribute the Social Media Campaign Rubric and review the criteria in the research row.
      • Students collect and analyze detailed information about their elected officials and target audience, using their analysis to select two social media platforms for their campaign.
    • Invite social media teams to discuss and locate themselves on the rubric, then explain to students that they are now ready to move to the next phase in the next lesson, planning their social media campaign posts and content.

    Unless otherwise noted, #Rights #Representation #Change by Educurious is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0.

    Lesson 2.3: Design Your Social Media Campaign

    Module 2 Icon

    Unit Driving Question:

    How can we use social media to engage community members on issues of injustice?

    Module Driving Question:

    How have people identified problems and responded to them?

    Learning Targets

    I can:

    • Analyze a group’s social media feed for evidence that it is accomplishing a specific goal.
    • Identify the goal of my team’s weeklong social media campaign.
    • Use notes in my Social Media Campaign Planner to design a campaign that educates others, encourages informed action, and advocates for a change.

    Purpose

    In this lesson, you will move from the research and planning phase of your social media campaign to the design phase. You will identify the target audience, focus, and goal of your campaign. Then, you will explore and discuss why organic content on a social media feed is not always enough, and that planning out a menu of content, over time, on education, taking informed action, and advocacy can help achieve specific goals. Finally, you will draw on what they have learned throughout this unit to work with their social media team to design a campaign that helps them achieve their goal.

    Lesson Steps

    1. Identify the goal of your social media campaign. In your Social Media Campaign Plan, identify the goal of your campaign.
    2. Discuss organic content vs. planned content. Using social media feed handout for your case study group (Social Media Feed – City of Seattle Office of Emergency Management, Social Media Feed – DRCC, Social Media Feed – NWIFC), evaluate the extent to which the organic content in the feed helps the group achieve its mission.
    3. Design your campaign. Outline your campaign in your Social Media Campaign Plan by identifying channels, content, and posts that help you achieve your goal through education, informed action, and advocacy.
    Explore More

     

    Teacher Preparation Notes

    Pacing
    Lesson Timing:140 minutes
    Standards
    C4.6-8.3. Employ strategies for civic involvement that address a state or local issue.
    • CCSS
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.9: Analyze the relationship between a primary and secondary source on the same topic.CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.7: Conduct short research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question), drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration.
    Lesson Resources
    For StudentsFor EducatorsMaterials
    • n/a
    Lesson Overview
    In this lesson, students move from the research and planning phase of their social media campaign to the design phase. Social media teams identify the target audience, focus, and goal of their social media campaign. Then, they explore and discuss why organic content on a social media feed is not always enough, and that planning out a menu of content, over time, on education, taking informed action, and advocacy can help achieve specific goals. Finally, students draw on what they have learned throughout this unit to work with their social media team to design a campaign that helps them achieve their goal.
    Teacher Preparation
    • Have students conduct local research on their audience and focus area. The case studies for this unit address issues and problems in western Washington. If your district is in the mountains or eastern Washington, build time into this lesson for students to focus on researching a river near their community that is polluted, hazards specific to their region, and tribal-treaty right issues that may or may not be related to salmon. See examples in Step 1 of what this might look like and consider extending the length of Step 1 for students to do this local context work.
    • Step 4: Curate resources for students. If students conduct local research on their audience and issue, plan to curate additional resources they can draw on to identify content for their social media campaign. The content from the case study websites may or may not be applicable to your local context.

    Lesson Steps in Detail

    Step 1: Identify the goal of your social media campaign(25 min)

    Purpose: Students decide who their target audience is for the social media campaign and their focus, then write S.M.A.R.T. goals for their social media campaigns.

    You might say: In order to identify your goal for your social media campaign, you need to decide who your audience is, as well as the focus of your campaign. Let’s look at an example of what this could look like for each case study. Then, your social media team will have time to discuss and identify audience and focus.

    [Slides 2] Share that every social media campaign needs a target audience and focus.

    • Talking points:
    • Slide 2. Before you can identify your campaign goal, you need to first identify the target audience and focus of your social media campaign. This will include elected officials from your legislative district and may or may not be the same audience as the organizations in the case study.
    • If you have been reading the case study on City of Seattle Emergency Management but live in Leavenworth, your audience would be people who live in that region, and you would focus your campaign on hazards unique to that area—e.g., wildfires and avalanches.
    • If you have been reading the case study on the Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition and you live next the Snake River, your audience would be people who live near the Snake River, and you would focus your campaign on the pollution of that river.
    • If you have been reading the case study on the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission and you live in Walla Walla, then your audience would be people that live in your region, and you would focus on tribal-treaty rights around fishing and hunting specific to your region.

    (Optional) Provide teams time to research and identify their target audience and focus.

    • See teacher preparation section for more information.

    [Slide 3] Break down the mnemonic acronym, S.M.A.R.T., to give students criteria for creating a social media campaign goal.

    • S = Specific
    • M = Measurable
    • A = Actionable
    • R = Realistic
    • T = Time-bound

    [Slides 4–8] Explain each component of S.M.A.R.T.

    • Slide 4. A specific goal is one area of something you can improve. For example, if you want to improve people’s understanding about wildfires, you might decide to educate people on how wildfires start, actions they can take to prevent the start of wildfires, and understanding that people cannot have open fires when there is a fire ban.
    • Slide 5. A measurable goal is a quantity of something that changes. For example, if you are running a social media campaign on educating people about how wildfires start so they can take actions to prevent wildfires from starting, you want people to “like” or “share” posts in your campaign raising awareness about wildfire prevention activities that any person can take.
    • Slide 6. An actionable goal has a clear set of tasks and actions you can take towards the goal. Your social media team will identify content and curate content that will be posted in a particular sequence to progress toward a specific goal.
    • Slide 7. A realistic goal states what results you can achieve with the resources you have. Using the example of wildfire awareness, it is not realistic that your social media campaign stops wildfires from starting, but it might be realistic that students in your school and elected officials are more aware of what they can do to prevent wildfires.
    • Slide 8. A time-bound goal means what it sounds like. Your social media campaign has a start date and end date. It does not go on forever.

    [Slide 9] Social media teams create a S.M.A.R.T. goal for their campaign.

    • Prompt students to go to Part 9 in their Social Media Campaign Planner and review the directions.
      • Come up with S.M.A.R.T. goals for your social media campaign. Respond to the guiding questions for each letter of S.M.A.R.T., then try and synthesize all of your responses into a one-sentence goal statement. Make sure everyone on your team understands the goal because, in the next lesson, you use the goal to plan your social media campaign.
    • Provide students time to respond to the questions independently so they are prepared to discuss their ideas with their team.
    • Prompt students to share their ideas with their teams and remind them that their goal is to come to consensus on each component of their S.M.A.R.T. goal.
    • When teams have their S.M.A.R.T. goals, invite groups to share them out with the class.
      • Use the descriptions and examples of S.M.A.R.T. goals in Part 9 of the Social Media Campaign Planner to monitor and support teams.
    Step 2: Discuss organic content vs. planned content(15 min)

    Purpose: Students examine posts that their case study organization created or shared over 1–2 weeks in order to determine if their posts helped them achieve a specific goal. This helps students think about the value of planning out content to achieve a goal, versus posting content or sharing content somewhat organically.

    You might say: To help us understand why planning content through a social media campaign is one successful way to cause change, we’ll examine social media posts made by your case study organization to infer their goals and progress they made toward those goals.

    [Slides 10–11] Facilitate an investigation into social media content that is organic vs. planning.

    • Organize students into their social media teams.
    • Slide 10. Distribute the Social Media Feed slide decks and have teams access the one that is the focus of their case study, then review the directions.
      • Review social media posts shared over 1–2 weeks from your case study organization.
      • Identify the purpose of each post as: educational, taking informed action, or advocating.
      • Using the content you have reviewed, infer the group’s social media goal and explain whether they it or not.
    • Prompt students to scroll down to the last slide and explain that this is where they type in their inference and assessment of whether or not their organization achieved a specific goal.
    • Provide teams time to work.
    • Slide 11. Invite teams back as a whole class to share out on the last two prompts.
      • Did they have a specific goal?
      • What do you think they achieved through these posts?
    • Explain to students that organic content is an important part of social media, and in order to achieve a certain goal, organizations have to be deliberate about what they post and what they don’t post.
    Step 3: Design your campaign(100 min)

    Purpose: Teams design their social media campaign by drawing on their research throughout the unit, identifying the channels, content, timeline, and tags required to help them achieve their goal.

    You might say: Now it’s time for your social media team to draw on your research from your Social Media Campaign Planner to develop a social media campaign that uses rich and engaging content to educate, advocate, and encourage people to take informed action. You will use the plan your team comes up with today to create the social media feed for your campaign in the next lesson.

    [Slide 12] Review the design template that teams use to outline their social media campaign.

    • Distribute the Social Media Campaign Plan as a collaborative online document to each team and review the directions with students.
      • Use the checklist to guide your team through the design of your social media campaign. Check off components when they are completed. You will use your plan to create your social media posts in the next lesson.

    [Slide 13] Share helpful tips for completing their social media campaign plan.

    • Talking points:
    • Use your research! Draw on your research from your Social Media Campaign Planner to help you create your plan.
    • Divide up the work! Assign roles or tasks to different people in your group to help you complete your plan.
    • Manage your time! Come up with a plan for how to manage your work time. It is helpful for someone to keep time and have the group check back in on their progress every 15–20 minutes.

    As teams are working, use the checklist on the Social Media Campaign Plan to monitor and support students.

    [Slide 14] Facilitate a reflection on planning a social media campaign.

    • Have students turn-and-talk:
      • What content have you identified that will inspire your audience to get involved and take informed action to address a problem?
      • What questions do you have? Or what help does your team need?
    • Invite students to share out.
    • Update the class Know & Need to Know chart as needed.

    Unless otherwise noted, #Rights #Representation #Change by Educurious is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0.

    Module 3: Change Campaigns

    Module Overviewicon

    Module 3: Change Campaigns

    #Rights #Representation #Change

    Unit Driving Question

    How can we use social media to engage community members on issues of injustice?

    Module Driving Question

    How can I use social media to educate, advocate, and encourage others to take informed action?

    Module Overview

    In this module, students take their social media campaign live through an in-class social media simulation. In the first lesson, students create a team hashtag that helps people connect to their social media campaign. Students then create their sequence of posts, which include content, tags, hashtags, and text. In the second lesson, students share their social media campaign feed with at least two other teams, and those teams use the Social Media Campaign Rubric to give specific and actionable feedback. Then, teams review their feedback and make revisions that help them engage more people and achieve their campaign goal. In the third lesson, students engage in a social media simulation where they scroll through each team’s feed to learn about the three key issues from a youth perspective and what they can do to take informed action and advocate for change. In the fourth and final lesson, students read one or more articles about youth using social media to cause change and reflect on what they have learned about youth civic action in this unit by discussing and responding to the Unit Driving Question.

    Lesson 3.1: Create Your Posts (100 minutes)
    Learning TargetsI can:
    • Identify hashtags that others are using when they share similar or related content.
    • Create a team hashtag for our team’s social media campaign that helps others connect with our content and message.
    • Create engaging and authentic text for posts that are 100–140 characters in length.
    In this lesson, students identify and create hashtags and text that go along with their content. First, students review hashtags that are being used to share content on the issue and problem identified in their case study. Then, they create a team hashtag and text for each post that creates interest and engagement in their content. In the next lesson, students share their work with other social media teams to receive feedback and make revisions.
    Lesson 3.2: Feedback and Revision (55 minutes)
    Learning TargetsI can:
    • Share my team’s social media campaign posts with the class and receive feedback in order to maximize engagement and impact.
    • Collaborate with my social media team to evaluate and provide specific and actionable feedback to other social media teams on their campaign posts.
    In this lesson, students share the social media campaign they have designed with other social media teams in order to receive feedback. They will then regroup with their team to review feedback and make necessary revisions, changes, additions, and subtractions in preparation for making social media feeds public in the next lesson.
    Lesson 3.3: Social Media Simulation (55 minutes)
    Learning TargetsI can:
    • Engage with each social media team’s campaign feed to learn about their issue and what informed action I can take to support the issue.
    • Identify impactful posts from campaign feeds and explain why they are effective.
    • Review user data and feedback in order to determine the extent to which my team achieved our social media campaign goal.
    In this lesson, students have time to scroll through and engage with each team’s social media campaign feed. They identify one post from each feed that they would share on their social media accounts and explain why. Finally, working with their team, students analyze their social media campaign’s user data and reflect on the extent to which their team achieved its goal.
    Lesson 3.4: Pinwheel Discussion (70 minutes)
    Learning TargetsI can:
    • Follow the Pinwheel format to engage in collegial discussion.
    • Use evidence from articles on youth civic action to support my responses in the discussion.
    • Reflect on what I have learned about youth civic action through social media to educate, advocate, and encourage informed action.
    In this lesson, students prepare for and participate in a Pinwheel Discussion that supports them in responding to the Unit Driving Question: How can we use social media to engage community members on issues of injustice?
    Module Assessments
    • Lesson 3.1: Hashtag handout, Social Media Campaign Feed
    • Lesson 3.2: Social Media Campaign Rubric, Team Reflection
    • Lesson 3.3: Feedback Card
    • Lesson 3.4: Pinwheel Notes Tracker, Provocateur Guide, Pinwheel Discussion Rubric
    Vocabulary
    No new vocabulary

    Unless otherwise noted, #Rights #Representation #Change by Educurious is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0.

    Lesson 3.1: Create Your Posts

    Module 3 Icon

    Unit Driving Question:

    How can we use social media to engage community members on issues of injustice?

    Module Driving Question:

    How can I use social media to educate, advocate, and encourage others to take informed action?

    Learning Targets

    I can:

    • Identify hashtags that others are using when they share similar or related content.
    • Create a team hashtag for our team’s social media campaign that helps others connect with our content and message.
    • Create engaging and authentic text for posts that are 100–140 characters in length.

    Purpose

    In this lesson, you will identify and create hashtags and text that go along with your content. First, you will review hashtags that are being used to share content on the issue and problem identified in your case study. Then, you will create a team hashtag and text for each post that creates interest and engagement in your content. In the next lesson, you will share your work with other social media teams to receive feedback and make revisions.

    Lesson Steps

    1. Identify hashtags for your campaign. Write the goal of your social media campaign on the Hashtag handout. Identify five hashtags that are being used on the issue and problem in your case study. Create a team hashtag that your team will use in each post. Your hashtag should help you achieve your campaign goal.
    2. Design your posts. Practice using the Social Media Campaign Rubric to evaluate example social media posts. Then, use what you have learned from this practice to write text for each of your team’s social media posts in your Social Media Campaign Feed. Your posts should use your voice and style, and help you achieve your campaign goal.

    Teacher Preparation Notes

    Pacing
    Lesson Timing:100 minutes
    Standards
    C4.6-8.3: Employ strategies for civic involvement that address a state or local issue.
    • CCSS
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audienceCCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.7: Conduct short research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question), drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration.

     

    Lesson Resources
    For StudentsFor EducatorsMaterials
    • n/a
    Lesson Overview
    In this lesson, students identify and create hashtags and text that go along with their content. First, students review hashtags that are being used to share content on the issue and problem identified in their case study. Then, they create a team hashtag and text for each post that creates interest and engagement in their content. In the next lesson, students share their work with other social media teams to receive feedback and make revisions.
    Teacher Preparation
    • Step 1. Consider encouraging students to use their smart phones for research. Students are asked to identify hashtags that are used for content on the issue and problem they have been learning about in their case study. Students can use examples of social media posts from previous lessons, and it might be helpful for them to be able to search social media platforms for other hashtags. It is common for schools to block students from accessing social media on their school-issued laptops. Alternatively, if conducting research on social media is not possible using student phones and/or school-issued laptops, consider assigning Step 1 as homework before this lesson.

    Lesson Steps in Detail

    Step 1: Identify hashtags for your campaign  (25 min)

    Purpose: Students explore social media platforms for content on their issue and problem, and note the hashtags associated with that content. Then, students work together with their team to create a team hashtag that is unique to their social media campaign and helps them achieve their goal.

    You might say: Today, you will research hashtags that are associated with similar content in order to brainstorm a hashtag that helps your team engage more social media users and make progress toward your goal.

    [Slides 2–4] Students research a variety of hashtags related to their issue and problem.

    • Slide 2. Explain to students that they are watching a short video on hashtags. As students are watching the video, have them listen for information on two questions.
      • What are hashtags?
      • Why do people use them?
    • Play the video: Instagram Hashtag Strategy Session: How to use hashtags to get SEEN to 4:44. The entire video is 6 minutes and 30 seconds long.
    • Invite students turn and talk, returning to the two questions.
      • What are hashtags?
      • Why do people use them?
    • Invite students to share out their responses. Possible responses include:
      • Hashtags are a tool that helps you categorize your post by topic, and hashtags help you see content you “like.”
      • People use hashtags to expand their reach to a wider audience.
    • Slide 3. Distribute the Hashtag handout and review the directions with students.
      • Conduct research on what hashtags people and organizations are using when they post content that is similar to the focus on your social media campaign. Use this information to help you brainstorm hashtags that are unique to your campaign and help you in achieving your goal. Then choose one hashtag that helps people connect to your social media campaign.
    • Slide 4. Highlight helpful resources that students can return to for this task. If you decide to have students use their phones or school-issued laptops to do research on social media channels, remember to check with your principal and/or technology specialist about your school’s technology policies.
    • When teams have finished their research and identified a unique hashtag, invite them to share out what they have learned and created.
    Step 2: Design your posts(75 min)

    Purpose: Students create the text they want to post for each piece of content. This is the last step in the design phase of their social media campaign before they receive feedback from their peers and their teacher.

    You might say: Before you create posts for your team’s campaign, you will have a chance to practice using the Social Media Campaign Rubric to deepen your understanding about the qualities of an engaging social media post.

    [Slides 5–8] Evaluate example social media posts using the rubric criteria.

    • Slide 5. Distribute the Social Media Campaign Rubric.
      • Explain that they have been working on three rows: “Research,” “Goal,” and “Content.”
      • Review the rows “Tags and Hashtags” and “Text.”
    • Slide 6. Show example post #1. Ask:
      • Based on the information we have in this single post and the rubric, what are the strengths of this post and what feedback would you give the person who posted this?
        • Possible strengths: This post launches a social media campaign around Prepare to Protect. There is a hashtag aligned to this goal/theme and the post invites people to share how they prepare.
        • Possible feedback: Consider tagging local and state elected officials, so they can support the social media campaign.
    • Slide 7. Show example post #2. Ask:
      • Based on the information we have in this single post and the rubric, what are the strengths of this post and what feedback would you give the person who posted this?
        • Possible strengths: The post opens with a question that immediately engages the audience and invites them to respond. There are hashtags that relate to two topics or social media campaigns, where people can learn more.
        • Possible feedback: Consider tagging local and state elected officials, so they can support the social media campaign.
    • Slide 8. Show example post #3. Ask:
      • Based on the information we have in this single post and the rubric, what are the strengths of this post and what feedback would you give the person who posted this?
        • Possible strengths: The post provides an update on community action that recently took place to improve the environment and fish habitat.
        • Possible feedback: Consider tagging local and state elected officials, so they are aware of the action being taken. Create a hashtag where people can learn about other examples of action people are taking to clean up watersheds and basins.

    [Slides 9–10] Create a draft of your social media campaign feed.

    • Slide 9. Distribute the Social Media Campaign Feed slide deck and review the directions.
      • Using your Social Media Campaign Plan and your Hashtag handout, draft your posts in the sequence in which they are scheduled. For each post, include text, content, hashtags, and tags. Your text should be 100–140 characters. It should be engaging and authentic, and catch the attention of your audience/followers.
    • Slide 10. Share the following tips for how students can work together to complete this team task.
      • Divide up the work. Assign each person on your team a certain number of posts to design.
      • Manage your time. Have someone set a timer for chunks of work time so students can check back in on their team’s progress during this extended work time.
      • Proof read. When your team has all the posts designed in your Social Media Campaign Feed slide deck, have someone read through each post to make sure there are no typos or errors.
      • Check alignment. Have someone check that the content and sequence of content matches what’s in your plan.
      • Check the links. Have someone go through and check that all the links work and send your audience and followers to the right location.
    • As teams are working, use the Social Media Campaign Rubric to provide feedback and coach students on their design and the development of their posts.

    [Slide 11] Return to the class Know & Need to Know chart. Discuss the following questions:

    • Looking back on this unit, what have you learned about creating a social media campaign that educates, advocates, and encourages informed action?
    • Are there any questions we still have about creating a social media campaign to cause change?

    Unless otherwise noted, #Rights #Representation #Change by Educurious is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0.

    Lesson 3.2: Feedback and Revision

    Module 3 Icon

    Unit Driving Question:

    How can we use social media to engage community members on issues of injustice?

    Module Driving Question:

    How can I use social media to educate, advocate, and encourage others to take informed action?

    Learning Targets

    I can:

    • Share my team’s social media campaign posts with the class and receive feedback in order to maximize engagement and impact.
    • Collaborate with my social media team to evaluate and provide specific and actionable feedback to other social media teams on their campaign posts.
    PurposeIn this lesson, you will share the social media campaign you have designed with other social media teams in order to receive feedback. You will then work with your team to review feedback and make necessary revisions, changes, additions, and subtractions in preparation for making social media feeds public in the next lesson.Lesson Steps
    1. Evaluate social media campaigns and provide feedback: Collaborate with your social media team to evaluate each social media team’s campaign posts using the Social Media Campaign Rubric. Give feedback that is constructive and affirming.
    2. Review feedback and make revisions: Review and discuss the feedback your team received from other teams. Identify revisions you want to make and why, then update your campaign.
    3. Complete the Team Reflection: Using the Team Reflection, reflect on your team’s successes and challenges in preparation for your social media campaign.

    Teacher Preparation Notes

    Pacing
    Lesson Timing:55 minutes
    Standards
    SSS3.6-8.1: Engage in discussion, analyzing multiple viewpoints on public issues.
    • CCSS
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.1.B: Support claim(s) with logical reasoning and relevant, accurate data and evidence that demonstrate an understanding of the topic or text, using credible sources.CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.5: With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.

     

    Lesson Resources
    For StudentsFor EducatorsMaterials
    • n/a
    Lesson Overview
    In this lesson, students share the social media campaign they have designed with other social media teams in order to receive feedback. They will then regroup with their team to review feedback and make necessary revisions, changes, additions, and subtractions in preparation for making social media feeds public in the next lesson.
    Teacher Preparation
    • Step 1. Decide which teams evaluate which feeds. The ideal outcome is that each team receives feedback from two different teams. Depending on your class size or the number of teams, this might require you to adjust the timing and expectations for Step 1.

    Lesson Steps in Detail

    Step 1: Evaluate social media campaigns and provide feedback(25 min)

    Purpose: Students gather in their social media teams to evaluate one or multiple social media campaigns. Each team completes a rubric with affirming and constructive feedback.

    You might say: Your task will be to evaluate at least two social media campaign feeds using the project rubric. Your objective is to help other teams find opportunities in their feed to help them achieve their goal and make the greatest impact on the problem.

    [Slide 2] Have students gather in teams.

    • Share social media campaign slide decks and the Social Media Campaign Rubric with each team, making sure that teams are reviewing and evaluating two different social media campaigns.
    • Share the feedback protocol:
      • You have 25 minutes to review and discuss two social media campaigns.
        • Take six minutes to review the campaign and evaluate it with the rubric.
        • Take six minutes to share out and discuss your ratings. One team member should take notes on a copy of the Social Media Campaign Rubric that is shared with the team.
      • Then place the completed rubric aside for the moment and repeat the process.
    • Consider modeling specific and actionable feedback for students using a team’s social media campaign and the Social Media Campaign Rubric.
    • As teams are engaged in the protocol, support teams and students by managing time with a timer, coaching students to use the language in the Social Media Campaign Rubric to give specific and actionable feedback.
    • After students have completed both rounds, prompt teams to deliver their completed rubrics to the appropriate teams.
    Step 2: Review feedback and make revisions (25 min)

    Purpose: Social media teams review feedback, then discuss and revise their social media campaign feed slides.

    You might say: You will now review feedback from fellow social media teams. Read their feedback carefully and prioritize the changes your team should make based on which changes will help you best position your team to reach your goal and have the greatest impact on the problem.

    [Slide 3] Have teams review feedback on the Social Media Campaign Rubric and identify revisions they want to make.

    • Explain to teams that their next task is to go through the feedback on the rubrics they received to identify ways they can strengthen their social media campaign design. Have teams consider the following questions:
      • What is your social media campaign goal?
      • Based on peer feedback, what revisions will you make?
      • How will these revisions help you reach your campaign goal?
    • Provide teams time to review, discuss, and identify the revisions.
    • Invite teams to share out with the class what they are revising and why.
    • Provide teams time to make revisions.
    • Use the Social Media Campaign Rubric to support and coach teams as they are making revisions.
    Step 3: Complete the team reflection(5 min)

    Purpose: Social media teams reflect on their process of creating a social media campaign as a way to celebrate their hard work and give voice to challenges and successes.

    [Slide 4] Have social media teams complete a Team Reflection.

    • Distribute the Team Reflection and have teams respond to the following prompts.
      • What team successes have you experienced in preparing your social media campaign?
      • What challenges have you experienced in preparing your social media campaign?

    Unless otherwise noted, #Rights #Representation #Change by Educurious is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0.

    Lesson 3.3: Social Media Simulation

    Module 3 Icon

    Unit Driving Question:

    How can we use social media to engage community members on issues of injustice?

    Module Driving Question:

    How can I use social media to educate, advocate, and encourage others to take informed action?

    Learning Targets

    I can:

    • Engage with each social media team’s campaign feed to learn about their issue and what informed action I can take to support the issue.
    • Identify impactful posts from campaign feeds and explain why they are effective.
    • Review user data and feedback in order to determine the extent to which my team achieved our social media campaign goal.

    Purpose

    In this lesson, you will have time to scroll through and engage with each team’s social media campaign feed. You will identify one post from each feed that you would share on your social media accounts and explain why. Finally, working with your team, analyze your social media campaign’s user data and reflect on the extent to which your team achieved its goal.

    Lesson Steps

    1. Read social media campaign feeds. Your teacher will share your social media feed with other teams in the class. Read each social media feed and use the Feedback Card to identify a post that demonstrated an effective social media campaign strategy and explain why.
    2. Review and discuss user data. Your teacher will distribute the completed social media feedback cards to each team. Analyze the cards for information that will help you determine the extent to which your team achieved your social media campaign goal.

     

    Teacher Preparation Notes

    Pacing
    Lesson Timing:55 minutes
    Standards
    SSS1.6-8.1: Analyze positions and evidence supporting an issue or an event. SSS3.6-8.1: Engage in discussion, analyzing multiple view- points on public issues. 
    • CCSS
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.1: Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.7: Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts.

     

    Lesson Resources
    For StudentsFor EducatorsMaterials
    • n/a
    Lesson Overview
    In this lesson, students have time to scroll through and engage with each team’s social media campaign feed. They identify one post from each feed that they would share on their social media accounts and explain why. Finally, working with their team, students analyze their social media campaign’s user data and reflect on the extent to which their team achieved its goal.
    Teacher Preparation
    • Step 1. Decide how you want to share student social media campaign feeds. Consider locating every team’s feed in one shared location, such as Padlet, where students can “like” and comment on posts.
    • Step 1. Adjust time for larger classes. Students should be provided five minutes to review each team’s social media feed. This works for classes of 25 or smaller. For classes that have more than 25 students, consider reducing the review time to four minutes, or you can make this a two-day lesson, so students are able to read their peers’ feeds in the classroom.

    Lesson Steps in Detail

    Step 1: Read social media campaign feeds(30 min)

    Purpose: Students read the social media campaign feeds from different teams to learn more about the three issues through the perspectives of other students. Students identify one post from each campaign that they believe is the most impactful and one that they would share on their social media account(s).

    You might say: Today is the moment we have been working toward! You will have a chance to view your peers’ social media campaign feeds to learn more about the three issues we have been studying and what actions people can take to effect change.

    [Slide 2] Students review social media feeds.

    • Provide students access to an online folder where they can view the various social media campaign feeds created by their peers.
    • Distribute multiple copies of the Feedback Card to each student.
    • Review the directions.
      • You will have five minutes to review each team’s feed.
      • You will have one minute to give the team feedback using the feedback card.
      • Then repeat this process until you have reviewed all social media feeds.
    • Explain to students they have time to review the feedback cards for their team later in the lesson, and that they should work independently for this part of the lesson.
    • Keep track of time for students, and prompt them when it is time to review a new feed or complete a feedback card.
      • Students do not review their team’s feed.
    • Collect feedback cards as they are completed or after all feeds have been reviewed.
    Step 2: Review and discuss user data(25 min)

    Purpose: Students get back into their social media teams to reflect on their team’s goal using user feedback.

    You might say: Now, you will analyze user feedback to determine which post or posts in your feedback were most impactful. Then, you will have a chance to use the data to reflect on the extent to which you achieved your social media campaign goal.

    [Slides 3–4] Teams review user feedback.

    • Distribute the completed Feedback Cards to the appropriate teams.
    • Slide 3. Review the directions for user analysis:
      • Organize feedback cards by post (i.e., slide numbers).
      • Read aloud the feedback cards for the top three posts.
      • Discuss what posts and content were most engaging to your followers and why.
      • Determine the extent to which your team met its goal.
      • Be prepared to share out your response with the class.
    • Slide 4. After teams have reviewed and discussed feedback, provide time to respond to these prompts:
      • Explain what parts of your campaign goal were met or exceeded. Use evidence from your analysis to support your response.
      • Based on user feedback, what would your team do differently if you were tasked with creating another social media campaign?
    • Invite teams to share out their responses to the prompts. Encourage teams to use data to support their responses.

    Unless otherwise noted, #Rights #Representation #Change by Educurious is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0.

    Lesson 3.4: Pinwheel Discussion

    Module 3 Icon

    Unit Driving Question:

    How can we use social media to engage community members on issues of injustice?

    Module Driving Question:

    How can I use social media to educate, advocate, and encourage others to take informed action?

    Learning Targets

    I can:        

    • Follow the Pinwheel format to engage in collegial discussion.
    • Use evidence from articles on youth civic action to support my responses in the discussion.
    • Reflect on what I have learned about youth civic action through social media to educate, advocate, and encourage informed action.
    PurposeIn this lesson, you will prepare for and participate in a Pinwheel Discussion that supports you in responding to the Unit Driving Question: How can we use social media to engage community members on issues of injustice?Lesson Steps
    1. Introduce the Pinwheel Discussion: Become familiar with the discussion format that you will use.
    2. Organize your thinking: Read articles on youth civic action on social media. A group of students will organize and develop questions—these are the provocateurs. Provocateurs use the Provocateur Guide to learn about their roles in the discussion and prepare to support and advance the discussion.
    3. Prepare discussion questions: Create Need to Knows with your group to move the discussion toward building a consensus.
    4. Facilitate discussion: Engage in the Pinwheel Discussion to synthesize learning and build consensus. Discussion group members record their thinking on their Pinwheel Notes Tracker. Provocateurs use their guides. Discussants and Provocateurs reflect on what they have learned in the discussion.
    Articles on Youth Civic Action:

    Teacher Preparation Notes

    Pacing
    Lesson Timing:70 minutes
    Standards
    SSS2.6-8.1: Create and use research questions to guide inquiry on an issue or event. SSS3.6-8.1: Engage in discussion, analyzing multiple view- points on public issues. 
    • CCSS
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.1: Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.4: Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.
    Lesson Resources
    For StudentsFor EducatorsMaterials
    • Chart paper and markers
    Lesson Overview
    In this lesson, students prepare for and participate in a Pinwheel Discussion that supports them in responding to the Unit Driving Question: How can we use social media to engage community members on issues of injustice?
    Teacher Preparation
    • Decide if this lesson is one or two days. Consider separating this lesson into two class periods. The first class period is where students read articles and prepare for the discussion, and the second class period is where students conduct the discussion.
    • Step 2: Choose your provocateurs. This group works best with students who have experience, and/or enjoy, guiding discussions. Their job is to facilitate and help lead the discussion. Provocateurs ask questions, probing for evidence and supporting the discussion moving forward in a thoughtful and interesting way.
    • Step 4: Familiarize yourself with the discussion format. Watch this Teaching Channel video about how to facilitate a Pinwheel Discussion. To learn more about the role of the provocateur, review this resource from the National Council for the Social Studies.

    Lesson Steps in Detail

    Step 1: Introduce the Pinwheel Discussion(5 min)

    Purpose: This step introduces the expectations for the Pinwheel Discussion that students use to debrief their research and their social media campaigns as they answer the Unit Driving Question. What makes this discussion strategy unique is that it supports every student being engaged in the discussion at all times.

    You might say: You have done incredible work in this unit to break down and understand complex issues and think about how you can use social media to educate, advocate, and encourage others to take informed action on these complex issues. You have thought about how you would address these issues and how you would engage others, including elected officials. Today, we are going to wrap up our work by having a discussion using a format called a Pinwheel Discussion. This format will help us build consensus around our Unit Driving Question: How can we use social media to engage community members on issues of injustice? Our goal in this discussion is to understand what it takes for youth to lead change and cause change, and the role of social media in youth civic action.

    [Slide 2] Present students with the roles and process for the discussion.

    • Students get into groups of four or more students. Most are in a discussion group. One group is comprised of “provocateurs” who have a different role in the discussion.
    • One student from each team, including the provocateur group, sits, knees together, in the inner circle. They are supported by their teammates behind them.
    • The provocateur facilitates the discussion and asks questions for those in the inner circle to discuss.
    • After 3–5 minutes, the teams rotate a new member into the circle to continue the discussion.
    • This process continues until all team members have had a chance to be in the inner circle.

    Establish discussion groups. Assign students to groups of four or more.

    Step 2: Organize your thinking(25 min)

    Purpose: Students process their experience in this unit and learn about the experiences of other youth leading change through social media.

    [Slide 3] Engage students in preparing for the Pinwheel.

    • Have students join their groups.
      • Distribute three articles to students who are discussants.
    • Review the following discussion questions, which each group should answer, in preparation for the discussion. Remind students that they need to use evidence from the articles to support their responses to the questions.
          • Should youth be leading change at the local government level or with other teens?
          • How are youth using social media to address state and local issues?
          • What are the challenges and opportunities when using social media as a tool for change?
      • Distribute the Provocateur Guide to each member of the provocateur group.
    • As students in the discussion groups share their ideas, use the Provocateur Guide to explain the provocateur’s role and expectations.
    • Emphasize that the provocateurs need to be driving the discussion toward defining how any organization can use social media to engage elected officials and community members in order to effect change on social and environment justice issues.
    Step 3: Prepare discussion questions(10 min)

    Purpose: Students develop a list of questions based on what they need to know to have a consensus around the Unit Driving Question. This process builds on the work they have already done around establishing a class Know & Need to Know chart.

    [Slide 4] Have students develop their questions.

    • For the discussion groups:
      • Distribute chart paper and markers.
      • Remind students about the work they have already done with Know & Need to Know chart.
      • Prompt them to generate questions about what they need to know to come to a consensus about the Unit Driving Question.
      • Tell discussion groups that they are creating Need to Knows on their chart paper, and that these need to be in the format of a question.
    • Example: I need to know what civic action means à What does it mean to engage in civic action?
      • Explain to students that the quality of their questions is what makes or breaks this discussion. The more they care about the questions they come up with, the more engaging the discussion will be.
    • For the provocateur group:
      • Divide the provocateur group into pairs or trios.
      • As the discussion groups generate their Need to Know questions, have the pairs or trios of provocateurs circulate to read over the questions and think together about questions that can support the group in their discussion.
      • They should record their ideas and generate questions that drive the discussion toward consensus building on the first page of the Provocateur Guide.
      • Five minutes before the discussion, have the provocateur group come back together to share their ideas and facilitation questions with each other, and establish roles for when they are not facilitating discussion (Timekeeper, Question Manager, Evaluator).
    Step 4: Facilitate discussion(30 min)

    Purpose: This is the main event! Students cite their evidence from the articles they read as they share their thinking about the role of social media in youth civic action, while the provocateurs keep the conversation going.

    [Slide 5] Set up the discussion.

    • Distribute the Pinwheel Notes Tracker to each discussion group member. Provocateurs have different roles during the discussion and do not use this notes tracker.
    • Move students into the appropriate seating configuration.
      • The inner circle should be knee to knee and the rest of the class should be seated such that moving between roles can happen quickly.
    • Establish norms and expectations.
      • If your students are divided politically on their issues, remind them about the power and importance of a respectful dialogue. This is not cable news with people shouting at each other and sticking to their talking points.
      • Students have the articles in hand, and they read and use evidence from them during the discussion to support their responses.
      • Clarify the role of students outside the circle: Support their inner circle representative when prompted by the provocateur.
      • Clarify your role as the teacher during the discussion: Observe and mediate—only if norms and expectations are not followed.
    • Give clear and equal timing for discussion groups and have a member of the provocateur team manage the clock during each session.
    • Give the provocateur team the power to call a coaching break, where participants can move back into their teams for further discussion and the collecting of evidence. Make sure this is limited.

    Launch the discussion. Engage students in the Pinwheel Discussion. Remain in a facilitation role—this is intended to be a student-led discussion.

    [Slide 6] Conclude with reflection.

    • Have students return to their seats.
    • As a final reflection, have students write a brief response to the following prompts:
      • How did the Pinwheel Discussion support or change your thinking about the role of social media in youth civic action?
      • Is there anything you wish you had said?

    Unless otherwise noted, #Rights #Representation #Change by Educurious is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0.