Author:
Victor Ochoa
Subject:
U.S. History, Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab, Assessment, Lecture, Lecture Notes, Lesson Plan, Primary Source, Reading, Unit of Study
Level:
High School
Tags:
  • Hispanic History
  • Latino Arts and Culture
  • Latino/a American
  • Latinx History
  • Oregon History
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Downloadable docs, Graphics/Photos, Video

    Education Standards

    Latinos in Oregon

    Latinos in Oregon

    Overview

    This unit provides an overview on the presence, influence, and stories of Oregon's Latino community. Your students will be given a chance to challenge thier skills as aspiring historians while celebrating and discovering my beautiful community.

    Letter from the Author

    To the dedicated educators,

    Before you dive into the materials of this unit I wish to provide some context. Firstly, this unit was created during my teacher candidacy as my submission to the edTPA that I taught to my Oregon History students. In light of this, much of the unit was made in connection with historigraphical skills that my students here honing. While you review this unit, each lesson will contain previous pedogagical approaches I have taken, hyperlinks to the files via Google Drive, and PDF copies of said materials. Lastly, I wish to personally thank you for teaching your students the history of my beautiful community. If you ever find yourself in need of assistance or would like to share anything please feel free to reach out to me at vochoa.research@gmail.com

    Seguimos Adelante,

    Victor Ochoa

    LT1 Construction of Oregon's Latino Community

    Learning Target 1: By the end of the period, students will be able to describe the Spanish and early Latino presence in Oregon by creating a timeline with primary and secondary sources.

    Lecture Slides

    • There is an animation on slide 11 that is meant to provide an emphasis of the document and where students are to look.

    • Slide 12 is intended to be a class discussion before furthering the lecture. You may have to define/revisit the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and its impacts on Mexicans.

    • The video on slide 14 is supposed to show the students the horsemanship that originated with the Spanish and continued with the vaqueros.

    • On slide 17, you can provide an example of the issues in historical research. The text atop of the image denotes Mexican packers with the symbol “>” on the left hand margin. However, they are nowhere to be found and the column titled “No.” has similar symbols that appear to be denoted as a “7” but they appear similar. The lesson here is that when research is being done in the field of history there can always be small issues like this that could become a larger obstacle for further research.

    • Slide 17 has an animation  that is meant to provide an emphasis of the document and where students are to look.

    • The images on slide 18 are to demonstrate the expertise that the Mexican mule packers had and what the skills required for the profession.

    • Before beginning the activity, be sure to go over the O.P.V.L. analysis method through the diagram.

     

    Activity

    1. Arrange your students into groups of four by whichever means you see fit.

    2. Provide students with a digital or physical copy of the graphic organizer found in the “LT1 Materials” PDF file.

    3. Use a dice, or whatever randomization generator available, to determine the order in which the groups choose their document to analyze.

    4. Once all the groups have their materials ready, set a timer either for 20 or 25 minutes depending on your classroom dynamics. 

    5. Before the timer sounds off, be sure to place numbers around your classroom for the group portion of the activity.

    6. Once the timer ends, students are now to become “experts” in their documents and you are to number them off into jigsaw groups (you can also prepare jigsaw groups prior to the activity).

    7. When the students are getting settled into their jigsaw groups be sure to provide them with construction paper to assemble their timeline.

    8. Students are to utilize their documents and lecture materials to create a timeline of the Latino presence in Oregon with the content they have learned (students may utilize the internet but must cite their sources).

    9. Set a timer for the time you have left in your class period (be sure to leave some time if possible for the reflection).

    10. After completing the activity, students are to complete the reflection that is prompted in the lecture slides (or Google classroom).

    In this section, you will be seeing an overview of the Spanish presence in the Pacific Northwest and observe the growth of Oregon's Latino community. 

    Learning Target 1: By the end of the period, students will be able to describe the Spanish and early Latino presence in Oregon by creating a timeline with primary and secondary sources.

    Click here to view the lecture slides associated with this section.

    Click here to view the materials associated with this section.

    LT2 Scholarship of Oregon's Latino History

    Learning Target 2: By the end of the period, students will be able to identify the gaps in the scholarship of Latino history in Oregon by comparing and contrasting a selection of secondary source excerpts.

    Lecture Slides

    • Throughout slides 4-5 be sure to emphasize the issues of demographics, experiences, biases, sourcing issues, etc., that appear in historical research and the historians themselves.

    • Slides 6-8 are meant to become reflection points for your students that build up to a class discussion on the prompts presented on slide 9.

    Activity Procedure

    *DISCLAIMER* The reading materials for this activity are academically dense and you will be heavily advised to stick to assigning large reading groups for each one.

    1. Prior to the activity, be sure to provide digital or physical copies of the readings and learning support for your students. This includes creating the reading groups as well (it is highly recommended to attain the best learning experience).

    2. Once the groups are settled, cast a die to determine the order in which groups choose their reading.

    3. Before releasing the students, be sure to advise them to divide their texts and reading questions amongst one another. Preferably students should have at least one reading buddy. 

    4. Set a timer for at least 25 minutes and adjust accordingly to your students’ needs.

    5. While the students are working, be sure to number off places in your classroom for the jigsaw groups (it is highly recommended to create the jigsaw groups as well).

    6. Once the timer expires, number off the students and send them to their jigsaw groups.

    7. When the groups are settled, students are to share summaries and topics of their readings to their jigsaw groups.

    8. Following that, students are to discuss the similarities and differences in their readings within the group. Examples include author demographics, topics covered, missing voices/representations, and further inquiry brought by the students. 

    9. Set a timer for at least 20 minutes and adjust accordingly to your students’ needs.

    10. Lastly, students are to post a reflection on a prompt in the lecture slides (or you can run it as a class discussion).

    In this section, you will be reviewing the gaps in past and contemporary scholarship on Oregon's Latino history. 

    Learning Target 2: By the end of the period, students will be able to identify the gaps in the scholarship of Latino history in Oregon by comparing and contrasting a selection of secondary source excerpts.

    Click here to view the lecture slides associated with this section.

    Click here to view the materials associated with this section.

     

    LT3 Miniature Research Project

    Learning Target 3: By the end of the period, students will be able to demonstrate their historical research skills by researching on a topic related to the history of Oregon’s Latino community.

    Lecture Slides

    • Slide 3 presents two points that students are to know about before conducting the activity. It is important to note the impact cultural contexts provide in historical research of a community.

    • On slide 4, this is depicting one of the tools students will be using to complete this activity. If your students do not have any experience with historical research it would be recommended to teach them prior to this activity.

    • Slide 7-8 depicts the graphic organizer that your students will be using during the activity.

    • When you begin the activity, leave slide 9 on your device so students could reference the instructions. Slide 10 serves the same purpose.

    • Slide 13 and 14 is an optional reflection if your students are adept in historiography.

    Activity

    *RECOMMENDATION* per prior results, many students preferred to extend this activity out as many enjoyed the research experience. I would recommend extending this out to at least two days.

    1. Be sure to provide a digital or physical copy of the activity materials.

    2. After the instructions are given via the lecture slides, students are to choose a topic from the given list. Students are allowed to work either alone or with a partner and if students have a topic in mind, allow for it.

    3. Provide ample time based on your knowledge of your students to research their topic. If this spills into another day be prepared for it.

    4. Be sure to check periodically with your students on their progress and if you feel right to do so, allow them room to work (i.e. be there when THEY need you).

    5. Prepare numbered areas in your classroom for jigsaw groups.

    6. Once your students complete their research, number them off into groups and bring up the prompts. Allot an amount of time based on your students’ needs. Students are to discuss their topics and their findings with their groups.

    7. Once you feel the groups are finished sharing, bring them back to the class and have the students share out.

    In this section, you will be researching several topics around Oregon's Latino community including but not limited to figures, events, cities, towns, movements, programs, court cases, buisnesses, etc. 

    Learning Target 3: By the end of the period, students will be able to demonstrate their historical research skills by researching on a topic related to the history of Oregon’s Latino community.

    Click here to view the lecture slides associated with this section.

    Click here to view the materials associated with this section.

    LT4 The Interview

     

    Learning Target 4: By the end of the period, students will be able to apply their knowledge of the procedural and technological components of an interview by participating in a mock interview and then creating an interview that will be conducted with participating members of the Latino community in Oregon.

    Lecture Slides

    • The prompt on slide 3 is to be used as the bell ringer (class discussion).

    • Slide 4’s video gives an overview on the importance of oral history and dispels several myths.

    Activity

    1. Be sure to provide students with writing supplies to conduct the two mock interviews.

    2. Students are to choose a partner to conduct a mock interview with the content taught in mind.

    3. Provide at least 10 minutes for students to compose a few interview questions.

    4. Once the time allotted ends, provide ample time for students to interview their partner based on your students’ needs.

    5. When the time concludes, provide time for a reflection as a class on what went wrong, what felt right, and what questions students still have about the process.

    6. Following that, have students assemble in groups that make sense with your class numbers.

    7. Provide topics to the groups to create interview questions for you.

    8. Repeat step 3.

    9. When the groups are ready, take each outside the classroom to conduct the interview.

    10. You will be assessing their ability to create interview questions, create follow up questions, and your interview etiquette. 

    11. Once all the groups have gotten a chance to interview you have the students write or discuss a response to the prompt on slide 15.

    *IMPORTANT NOTICE* There is an interview assignment that is attached to this learning target. Be sure to give ample time for students to complete this as it will aid their attempt at the summative assessment.

    In this section, you will be practicing the skills required of an interview for you to then apply it. Following this lesson you will be tasked to conduct an interview with a member of the Latino community within your town, city, or rural area.

    Learning Target 4: By the end of the period, students will be able to apply their knowledge of the procedural and technological components of an interview by participating in a mock interview and then creating an interview that will be conducted with participating members of the Latino community in Oregon.

    Click here to view the lecture slides associated with this section.

    Click here to view the materials associated with this section.

    LT5 Interpreting Oral History Data

    Learning Target 5: By the end of the period, students will be able to understand the personal narratives of the members of Oregon’s Latino community in the greater context of their relationship and contribution to Oregon by examining and interpreting the data collected from the interviews the students conducted.

    Activity

    1. Students are to gather their interview data (audio, notes, etc.) in preparation for the activity.

    2. Students are to work through the “Interview Data Evaluation Worksheet” for an allotted amount of time appropriate for your students’ needs.

    3. Once the allotted time concludes, have students pair up or be in groups of 3 to discuss their findings. Again, allot an amount of time appropriate for your students’ needs.

    4. When the time concludes, students are to complete the reflection prompted on slide 8.

    In this section, you will be analyzing the data from your interview and interpreting it through a series of evaluations. 

    Learning Target 5: By the end of the period, students will be able to understand the personal narratives of the members of Oregon’s Latino community in the greater context of their relationship and contribution to Oregon by examining and interpreting the data collected from the interviews the students conducted.

    Click here to view the lecture slides associated with this section.

    Click here to view the materials associated with this section.

    LT6 Latinos in Oregon Summative Assessment

     

    Learning Target 6: By the end of the period, students will be able to evaluate the economic and cultural contributions of Oregon’s Latino community by creating a thesis derived from primary and secondary sources along with the collected narratives from the student-led interviews.

     

    This will be the summative assessment for the unit. All materials associated with this learning target can be found on the PDF file marked “LT6 Materials”.

    This section is will conclude the unit with the summative assessment. Students will be tasked to write an essay responding a given prompt. 

    Learning Target 6: By the end of the period, students will be able to evaluate the economic and cultural contributions of Oregon’s Latino community by creating a thesis derived from primary and secondary sources along with the collected narratives from the student-led interviews.

    Click here to view the materials associated with this section.