Author:
Pamela Sanders
Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Level:
High School
Tags:
  • How the Monuments Came Down
  • Monuments
  • Richmond
  • Social Justice
  • VPMmonuments
  • Virginia
  • Voting Rights Act of 1965
  • voting-rights-act-of-1965
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Downloadable docs, Video

    Education Standards

    Teaching Cultural Diversity

    Teaching Cultural Diversity

    Overview

     

     

    Original Title :

    How the Monuments Came Down

    Author:

    Created by on October 8,2021 by #GoOpenVA.Administrator.

    License: Common Attributive

    It is a great tool for teaching both writing and cultural diversity. It has a refreshing theme. It guides students to a 21st century relavant approach to Black History. Most students are repetitiously taught lessons about what happened back then. The lessons include current events which presents a connection between the present the past and the future generations.

     

    Series Introduction

    How the Monuments Came Down explores the complex history of Richmond, Virginia through the lens of Confederate monuments, supported by an extensive visual record never before presented in a single work.

    Through personal stories from descendants and history-makers, the film uncovers how Confederate monuments came to shape Richmond’s landscape and why protestors demanded they come down.

    In this collection, you will find film clips and learning resources designed to engage students with primary sources found in the film. These curriculum resources were written by Rodney Robinson, the 2019 National Teacher of the Year and a 20-year veteran of Richmond Public Schools.  For a PDF version of the guide, with extension activities, visit vpm.org/monuments.

    How the Monuments Came Down is a production of Field Studio, in association with VPM.

     

    NOTE TO TEACHERS:

    The video clips, Caricatures of African Americans and Monument Avenue Commission, include depictions of blackface; in an effort to provide authentic and transparent resources about the historical experiences of Black Americans, these moments were not censored. Some abusive language appears in one primary resource in The Right to Vote.

    The “n” word appears in one archival source commenting on the suppression of the Black vote in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

    A reporter notes that a City Council member said that the city “still has a hell of a long way to go.”

     

    Sensitive: This resource contains material that may be sensitive for some students. Teachers should exercise discretion in evaluating whether this resource is suitable for their class.

     

    Episode List and Direct Links

    Curriculum Guide Introduction

    Dear Teachers,

    Thank you for taking a moment in your busy day to consider this curriculum guide for How the

    Monuments Came Down, an essential film for viewing — and teaching.

    How the Monuments Came Down is a fascinating documentary that tells a 160 year struggle for suffrage, political power, and respect for Black Richmonders. It combines great storytelling with outstanding primary sources to reveal narratives that have widely been dismissed in many documentaries.

    I have taught history in Richmond more than 20 years, and this film captures so much of the history of the city, the struggle, the political strife, the systemic racism, and the determination of the people to overcome. All students and teachers should watch this film and have deep, thoughtful discussions about systemic racism and how it appears in everything from legislation passed by the state lawmakers to statues to police and public interactions. I challenge teachers and students to watch and have respectful, open, and honest conversations about power and race in the city of Richmond.

    The guide is organized into two sections: the first presents graphic organizers for use with document analysis; the second offers document based questions. Each learning opportunity within is supported by a clip from the film and a primary source for students and teachers to analyze, in order to develop a deeper understanding of the film and the historical eras it explores. There is also a list of project-based activities to tap into deeper learning for your students. And every element of this guide is connected to the relevant Virginia Standards of Learning and Common Core State Standards.

    I hope that you find this guide as meaningful to teach as it was to create. My best wishes for your work,

    Rodney Robinson
    Richmond Public Schools
    2019 National Teacher of the Year

     

    Cultural Diversity

    How the Monuments Came Down is a fascinating documentary that tells a 160 year struggle for suffrage, political power, and respect for Black Richmonders. It combines great storytelling with outstanding primary sources to reveal narratives that have widely been dismissed in many documentaries. This lesson was put together by a teacher that has taught history in Richmond more than 20 years, It includes films that capture much of the history of the city, the struggle, the political strife, the systemic racism, and the determination of the people to overcome. I concur that all students and teachers should watch this film and have deep, thoughtful discussions about systemic racism and how it appears in everything from legislation passed by the state lawmakers to statues to police and public interactions. It is a challenge for teachers and students to watch and have respectful, open, and honest conversations about power and race not just in the city of Richmond but the United States abroad The guide is organized into two sections: the first presents graphic organizers for use with document analysis; the second offers document based questions. Each learning opportunity within is supported by a clip from the film and a primary source for students and teachers to analyze, in order to develop a deeper understanding of the film and the historical eras it explores. There is also a list of project-based activities to tap into deeper learning for your students. And every element of this guide is connected to the relevant Common Core State Standards. I hope that you utilize this guide for the dual purpose teaching writing across the curriculum as well as cultural diversiity through history,