All resources in Oregon Arts

Saksanica: Cultural Appreciation vs. Cultural Appropriation

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Award-winning filmmaker Leya Hale explores the traditional dress-making culture of Lakota and Dakota communities. Tanner Peterson, a member of the Upper Sioux Community, is the videographer and production assistant. Interviews with Gaby Strong, Pejuta Haka Red Eagle, Gabrielle Tateyuskanskan, Leah Thomas, Marcy Fiddler and Lonna Stevens discuss the materials, hand craft, adornments and cultural heritage of traditional Dakota and Lakota women's dresses. This program was made possible by the voters of Minnesota through legislative appropriation from The Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund. More About This Resource: Postcards is an award-winning series showcasing the arts, history, and cultural heritage of western Minnesota and beyond. Funding for Postcards comes from the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund. To watch more Postcards, visit the show page or video portal.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Author: PBS Learning Media

Augmented Reality | Media Arts Toolkit

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Kentucky reading teacher Ashley Judd uses augmented reality to get her students excited about learning. The PBS Digital Innovator says she has seen student engagement soar since she started using more technology in her classroom because students are already excited about using iPads and other devices. In this video, students use an augmented reality app to create an interactive memory book.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Oregon Department of Education : State of Oregon Arts Standards

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The State Board Adopted Oregon Arts standards provide a guide to what students should be able to know and do in arts courses at specified grade levels. Oregon adopted new Arts standards in September 2015. Based on the National Core Arts Standards, they contain standards for five discrete disciplines, a glossary for each discipline and supporting materials for the standards.

Material Type: Assessment

Remix

Primary Physical Education Creative Dance Unit

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This unit is presented as a progression of tasks that allow students to explore movement through a variety of creative tasks. Students will move in personal and general space, while exploring elements of shape, size, speed, force, flow, and time. To promote student confidence and willingness in dance, teachers should isolate the dance elements before asking students to apply these elements using imagery or partner/group tasks.The National Standards and Grade-Level Outcomes in this unit are referenced from the "National Standards & Grade Level Outcomes for K-12 Physical Education."SHAPE America Outcomes:KindergartenPerforms locomotor skills in response to teacher-led creative dance. (S1.E5.K)Maintains momentary stillness on different bases of support. (S1.E7.Ka)Forms wide, narrow, curled and twisted body shapes. (S1.E7.Kb)Contrasts the actions of curling and stretching. (S1.E10.K)Travels in general space with different speeds. (S2.E3.K)Recognizes that when you move fast, your heart beats faster and you breathe faster.3 (S3.E3.K)Follows directions in group settings (e.g., safe behaviors, following rules, taking turns). (S4.E1.K)Identifies physical activities that are enjoyable. (S5.E3.Ka)Grade OneCombines locomotor and nonlocomotor skills in a teacher- designed dance. (S1.E5.1)Maintains stillness on different bases of support with different body shapes. (S1.E7.1)Demonstrates twisting, curling, bending and stretching actions. (S1.E10.1)Differentiates between fast and slow speeds. (S2.E3.1a)Differentiates between strong and light force. (S2.E3.1b)Identifies the heart as a muscle that grows stronger with exercise, play and physical activity. (S3.E3.1)Accepts personal responsibility by using equipment and space appropriately. (S4.E1.1)Describes positive feelings that result from participating in physical activities. (S5.E3.1a)Grade TwoPerforms a teacher- and/or student- designed rhythmic activity with correct response to simple rhythms. (S1.E5.2)Balances on different bases of support, combining levels and shapes. (S1.E7.2a)Differentiates among twisting, curling, bending and stretching actions. (S1.E10.2)Combines balances and transfers into athree-part sequence (i.e., dance, gymnastics). (S1.E11.2)Varies time and force with gradual increases and decreases. (S2.E3.2)Identifies physical activities that contribute to fitness. (S3.E3.2b)Practices skills with minimal teacher prompting. (S4.E1.2)Identifies physical activities that provide self-expression (e.g. dance, gymnastics routines, practice tasks in games environments). (S5.E3.2)Photo Attribution: KCBalletMedia (Photography: Brett Pruitt & East Market Studios)References:Graham, G., Holt/Hale, S. A., & Parker, M. (2013). Children moving: A reflective approach to teaching physical education. 9th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill.Joyce, M. (1994). First steps in teaching creative dance to children. California: Mayfield Publishing.

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Author: Dorann Avey

Poetry Lesson

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This resource was created by Kate Steffen, in collaboration with Lynn Bowder, as part of ESU2's Mastering the Arts project. This project is a four year initiative focused on integrating arts into the core curriculum through teacher education and experiential learning.

Material Type: Lesson

Author: Arts ESU2

Chicana Dance Crew Blends Tap and Mexican Footwork | If Cities Could Dance

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La Mezcla is an all-female San Francisco dance company rooted in Latinx traditions, Chicano culture and social justice. Founder Vanessa Sanchez and the other dancers blend tap dance and zapateado or traditional footwork from Veracruz, Mexico, to create a style they call “zapatap.” Watch as they perform dynamic choreography in front of iconic Mission District murals and landmarks, then bring us back to the 1940s West Coast Zoot Suit era (popularized by Bay Area playwright Luis Valdez) when young Mexican-Americans or “pachucas” proudly repped Chicana identity and resistance, while defying cultural and style taboos. Rocking big hair and flashy zoot suits, the women of La Mezcla reclaim this early history, combining tap with son Jarocho Zapateado. If Cities Could Dance is a Webby Award-winning video series featuring dancers from cities across the United States. Step into the shoes of dancers from across the country who dare to imagine what it would look like if their city could dance.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Author: PBS Learning Media

Zydeco in Houston: Black Cowboys, Trail Rides & Creole Roots | If Cities Could Dance

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Houston’s zydeco dance scene brings joy and a driving rhythm to partner dancing, and in this episode, we explore the dance’s deep roots in Creole culture and music. What was called La-la in Southeastern Louisiana Creole communities became known as zydeco in Houston with the influence of R & B and the ‘King of Zydeco’, Clifton Chenier. Houston is where zydeco is thriving, evolving and reaching a broader audience, around trail-riding clubs who dance together after their rides to the accordion-driven sounds of zydeco bands with a touch of hip-hop. As infectious as zydeco is, it’s grown popular worldwide, but what hasn't changed is how zydeco brings community together in Houston. If Cities Could Dance is a Webby Award-winning video series featuring dancers from cities across the United States. Step into the shoes of dancers from across the country who dare to imagine what it would look like if their city could dance.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Author: PBS Learning Media

How Go-Go Music Inspires the Beat Ya Feet Dance Movement | If Cities Could Dance

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John “Crazy Legz” Pearson, founder of the Who Got Moves Battle League, is breathing life back into Beat Ya Feet -- the bouncy, fast-moving dance found in the streets, backyards and go-go clubs of Black D.C. At the heart of the dance style is the music: go-go, a blend of funk, call-and-response and Afro-Latin rhythms, ubiquitous in D.C.'s Black neighborhoods.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Author: PBS Learning Media

Dancing Shapes | All About Me

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Watch the clip, Bomba or Baseball, from Alma's Way to spark conversations about dancing and not getting things right on the first try. Then, introduce the activity to help students practice developing their coordination skills and work to strengthen their large muscles. NOTE: The PDF document assets and Support Materials are also available in Spanish.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Author: PBS Learning Media

The Art and Ancient Tradition of Storytelling (Advanced Level)

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Students will analyze scenes from the Trojan War that are visually depicted in an ancient object and an 18th-century painting. They will research an epic poem inspired by the Trojan War and write a literary response analyzing how themes and values in the poem reflect the historical context in which they were made. Finally, they will work in teams to reframe a tale from the Trojan War in a contemporary context -- visually and in poetry -- and recite the tale in a poetry slam.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Lesson Plan

Pairing Fiction With Poetry and Performance

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Make connections across genres and across cultures to engage students in the study of literary voice and themes. Comprehension skills and vocabulary also come into play, especially for English language learners, as students read a novel and related poems, then write and perform original poems related to the novel.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Unit of Study

Emotional Monologue | Social & Emotional Learning: The Arts for Every Classroom

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In this activity from Commonwealth Theatre Center in Louisville, Kentucky, students can write and perform a monologue addressed to a selected emotion describing their experiences with the emotion and why they would like to spend more or less time together. Students will better understand their relationship with their emotions and communicate complex ideas.

Material Type: Activity/Lab