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Introduction to Computer Science I
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CC BY
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This course will introduce students to the field of computer science and the fundamentals of computer programming. No prior programming experience is required. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Demonstrate an understanding of the history of computing as well as fundamental hardware and software concepts; Demonstrate an understanding of the programming life cycle; Explain how the JVM translates Java code into executable code; Demonstrate an understanding of Object-Oriented Programming concepts; Demonstrate an understanding of basic Java concepts by writing simple programs; Demonstrate an understanding of logical and relational operators as well as control structures; Demonstrate proficiency in basic Java I/O techniques by writing small programs. (Computer Science 101; See also: Mathematics 302)

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/16/2011
Computation and Visualization in the Earth Sciences
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CC BY-NC-SA
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In EARTH 801, you will develop skills in a programming language designed for visual arts and visualization while exploring Earth science topics. Specifically, you'll learn and practice digital graphics capabilities in order to render Earth science concepts that are otherwise difficult to visualize due to complicated space and time scales. Here, you will interact with large, open, freely-available data sets by collecting, plotting, and analyzing them using a variety of computational methods. You'll be ready to teach secondary school students a range of Next Generation Science Standard skills involving data collecting, manipulation, analysis, and plotting. You'll also read and discuss current research regarding the teaching, learning, and evaluation of visualization skills, as well as multiple external representations of science concepts.

Subject:
Computer Science
Environmental Science
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State College of Earth and Mineral Sciences
Author:
Eliza Richardson
Date Added:
10/07/2019
Computer Science K-12 Learning Standards
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Effective and relevant computer science education is essential to achieving our vision that “every student is ready for college, career, and life.” While attention to computer science education has increased in recent years, a lack of awareness about its content and potential impact is widespread. The Washington State Computer Science K–12 Learning Standards are designed to enhance teacher understanding and improve student learning so that students are better equipped for college, career, and life.

Washington is committed to implementing high-quality computer science instruction to:

* Increase the opportunity for all students to gain knowledge of computer science.
* Introduce the fundamental concepts and applications of computer science to all students, beginning at the elementary school level.
* Make computer science at the secondary level accessible, worthy of a computer science credit, and/or equivalent to math and science courses as a required graduation credit (see Level 3B of computer science standards).
* Offer additional secondary-level computer science instruction that allows interested students to study facets of computer science in depth and prepare them for entry into a career or college.

Learning standards describe what students need to know and be able to do. Standards are worded broadly to allow flexibility at the district, building, and classroom levels.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction
Date Added:
01/07/2019
Introduction to Computer Science II
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This course is a continuation of the first-semester course titled Introduction to Computer Science I. It will introduce the student to a number of more advanced Computer Science topics, laying a strong foundation for future academic study in the discipline. The student will begin with a comparison between Java--the programming language utilized last semester--and C++, another popular, industry-standard programming language. The student will then discuss the fundamental building blocks of Object-Oriented Programming, reviewing what they have learned learned last semester and familiarizing themselves with some more advanced programming concepts. The remaining course units will be devoted to various advanced topics, including the Standard Template Library, Exceptions, Recursion, Searching and Sorting, and Template Classes. By the end of the class, the student will have a solid understanding of Java and C++ programming, as well as a familiarity with the major issues that programmers routinely address in a professional setting. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Demonstrate an understanding of the concepts of Java and C++ and how they are used in Object-Oriented Programming; Demonstrate an understanding of the history and development of Object-Oriented Programming; Explain the importance of the C++ Standard Template Library and how basic components are used; Demonstrate a basic understanding of the importance of run-time analysis in programming; Demonstrate an understanding of important sorting and search routines in programming; Demonstrate an understanding of the generic usage of templates in programming for C++ and Java; Compare and contrast the features of Java and C++. (Computer Science 102; See also: Mathematics 303)

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/16/2011
Computer Science Midterm Paper
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CC BY
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The midterm represents the final week of working in Word. You will be asked to complete documents that demonstrate that you understand basic rules and best practices to ensure your online research is reliable as well as demonstrate skill in the proper use of Word features covered during the first 5 weeks of the course.

Skills & Knowledge Attained:
*Time management – You were asked to think about your midterm topic in week 1 and declare it in a post in week 2 and given several weeks to prepare and do the necessary research. Research document should demonstrate the time provided was used to spread out the work so that it was not done in a rush and/or at the last minute.
*Best practices on how to check a website for accuracy and truth as well as appropriateness as research source.
*Proper application of MLA requirements using Microsoft Word Reference features, such as adding footnotes, citations, and generating a bibliography from correctly added citations as well as placement and content of appropriate header and footer.
*The paper should be an original piece of writing based on properly cited online research, that demonstrates understanding of the topic researched and should explain in your own words, using proper spelling and grammar, what you have learned about your chosen topic.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Module
Author:
Maria Julia Sorrentino
Date Added:
03/28/2022
Lecture 1: Probability and Statistics for Computer Science
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Lecture for the course "CS 217 – Probability and Statistics for Computer Science" delivered at the City College of New York in Spring 2019 by Evan Agovino as part of the Tech-in-Residence Corps program.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
City College of New York
Author:
Evan Agovino
Nyc Tech-in-residence Corps
Date Added:
05/06/2020
Hands-On AI Projects for the Classroom: A Guide for Computer Science Teachers
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CC BY-NC-SA
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The projects in this guide use a student-driven approach to learning. Instead of simply learning about AI through videos or lectures, the students completing these projects are active participants in their AI exploration. In the process, students work directly with innovative AI technologies, participate in “unplugged” activities that further their understanding of how AI technologies work, and create various authentic products—from machine learning models to video games—to demonstrate their learning.

Project 1: Programming with Machine Learning
Project 2: AI-Powered Players in Video Games
Project 3: Using AI for Robotic Motion Planning
Project 4: Machine Learning as a Service

Visit the ISTE website with all the free practical guides for engaging students in AI creation: https://www.iste.org/areas-of-focus/AI-in-education

Subject:
Computer Science
Educational Technology
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Module
Unit of Study
Author:
General Motors
International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE)
Date Added:
07/24/2023
Foundations of Computation
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Foundations of Computation is a free textbook for a one-semester course in theoretical computer science. It has been used for several years in a course at Hobart and William Smith Colleges. The course has no prerequisites other than introductory computer programming. The first half of the course covers material on logic, sets, and functions that would often be taught in a course in discrete mathematics. The second part covers material on automata, formal languages, and grammar that would ordinarily be encountered in an upper level course in theoretical computer science.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Hobart and William Smith Colleges
Author:
Carol Critchlow, David Eck
Date Added:
02/18/2015
Homework: Probability and Statistics for Computer Science - Week #10
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Homework for the course "CS 217 – Probability and Statistics for Computer Science" delivered at the City College of New York in Spring 2019 by Evan Agovino as part of the Tech-in-Residence Corps program.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
City College of New York
Author:
Evan Agovino
Nyc Tech-in-residence Corps
Date Added:
05/06/2020
Homework: Probability and Statistics for Computer Science - Week #11
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Homework for the course "CS 217 – Probability and Statistics for Computer Science" delivered at the City College of New York in Spring 2019 by Evan Agovino as part of the Tech-in-Residence Corps program.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
City College of New York
Author:
Evan Agovino
Nyc Tech-in-residence Corps
Date Added:
05/06/2020
Homework: Probability and Statistics for Computer Science - Week #8
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Homework for the course "CS 217 – Probability and Statistics for Computer Science" delivered at the City College of New York in Spring 2019 by Evan Agovino as part of the Tech-in-Residence Corps program.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
City College of New York
Author:
Evan Agovino
Nyc Tech-in-residence Corps
Date Added:
05/06/2020
Homework: Probability and Statistics for Computer Science - Week #2
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Homework for the course "CS 217 – Probability and Statistics for Computer Science" delivered at the City College of New York in Spring 2019 by Evan Agovino as part of the Tech-in-Residence Corps program.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
City College of New York
Author:
Evan Agovino
Nyc Tech-in-residence Corps
Date Added:
05/06/2020
Homework: Probability and Statistics for Computer Science - Week #5
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Lecture for the course "CS 217 – Probability and Statistics for Computer Science" delivered at the City College of New York in Spring 2019 by Evan Agovino as part of the Tech-in-Residence Corps program.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
City College of New York
Author:
Evan Agovino
Nyc Tech-in-residence Corps
Date Added:
05/06/2020
Lecture 11: Probability and Statistics for Computer Science - "Linear Regression"
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Lecture for the course "CS 217 – Probability and Statistics for Computer Science" delivered at the City College of New York in Spring 2019 by Evan Agovino as part of the Tech-in-Residence Corps program.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
City College of New York
Author:
Evan Agovino
Nyc Tech-in-residence Corps
Date Added:
05/06/2020
Exam: Probability and Statistics for Computer Science - "Midterm Exam Review"
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Midterm Exam Review for the course "CS 217 – Probability and Statistics for Computer Science" delivered at the City College of New York in Spring 2019 by Evan Agovino as part of the Tech-in-Residence Corps program.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
City College of New York
Author:
Evan Agovino
Nyc Tech-in-residence Corps
Date Added:
05/06/2020
Computer Architecture
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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0.0 stars

The purpose of this course is to cultivate an understanding of modern computing technology through an in-depth study of the interface between hardware and software. The student will study the history of modern computing technology before learning about modern computer architecture, then the recent switch from sequential processing to parallel processing. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: identify important advances that have taken place in the history of modern computing and discuss some of the latest trends in computing industry; explain how programs written in high-level programming language, such as C or Java, can be translated into the language of the hardware; describe the interface between hardware and software and explain how software instructs hardware to accomplish desired functions; demonstrate an understanding of the process of carrying out sequential logic design; demonstrate an understanding of computer arithmetic hardware blocks and floating point representation; explain how a hardware programming language is executed on hardware and how hardware and software design affect performance; demonstrate an understanding of the factors that determine the performance of a program; demonstrate an understanding of the techniques that designers use to improve the performance of programs running on hardware; demonstrate an understanding of the importance of memory hierarchy in computer design and explain how memory design impacts overall hardware performance; demonstrate an understanding of storage and I/O devices, their performance measurement, and redundant array of inexpensive disks (more commonly referred to by the acronym RAID) technology; list the reasons for and the consequences of the recent switch from sequential processing to parallel processing in hardware manufacture and explain the basics of parallel programming. (Computer Science 301)

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/16/2011
Lecture 2: Probability and Statistics for Computer Science - "Descriptive Stats"
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Lecture for the course "CS 217 – Probability and Statistics for Computer Science" delivered at the City College of New York in Spring 2019 by Evan Agovino as part of the Tech-in-Residence Corps program.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
City College of New York
Author:
Agovino Evan
Cuny City College
Evan Agovino
Nyc Tech-in-residence Corps
Date Added:
05/06/2020
Exam: Probability and Statistics for Computer Science - "Practice Final Exam"
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Practice Final Exam for the course "CS 217 – Probability and Statistics for Computer Science" delivered at the City College of New York in Spring 2019 by Evan Agovino as part of the Tech-in-Residence Corps program.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
City College of New York
Author:
Evan Agovino
Nyc Tech-in-residence Corps
Date Added:
05/06/2020