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Paleoceanography
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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" This class examines tools, data, and ideas related to past climate changes as seen in marine, ice core, and continental records. The most recent climate changes (mainly the past 500,000 years, ranging up to about 2 million years ago) will be emphasized. Quantitative tools for the examination of paleoceanographic data will be introduced (statistics, factor analysis, time series analysis, simple climatology)."

Subject:
Oceanography
Physical Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Edward Boyle
Date Added:
01/01/2008
Principles of Macroeconomics 2e
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Principles of Macroeconomics 2e covers the scope and sequence of most introductory economics courses. The text includes many current examples, which are handled in a politically equitable way. The outcome is a balanced approach to the theory and application of economics concepts. The second edition has been thoroughly revised to increase clarity, update data and current event impacts, and incorporate the feedback from many reviewers and adopters.Changes made in Principles of Macroeconomics 2e are described in the preface and the transition guide to help instructors transition to the second edition.

Subject:
Economics
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
06/29/2017
Why is the Mediterranean a climate change hotspot?
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"Most climate models tend to agree on the Earth’s future when it comes to temperature: at our current pace of greenhouse gas emissions, it’s going to get hotter everywhere. That makes intuitive sense. What’s less obvious is what’s going to happen to precipitation. Models are generally in much weaker agreement about precipitation changes, but they seem to converge in predicting that certain areas are definitely going to get wetter and others drier. Among these, the Mediterranean stands out. Locally, the region may lose up to 40% of its winter precipitation. For the millions who depend on these seasonal rains, it’s a serious threat to their way of life. But researchers have yet to explain why numerous climate models settle on the same fate. Now, researchers from MIT have discovered two mechanisms that could converge to create this dire scenario: strengthening winds in the upper troposphere, at an altitude of about 10 km, and a diminishing temperature difference between land and sea..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Atmospheric Science
Physical Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
10/23/2020