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Abdominal Cavity and Laparoscopic Surgery
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Educational Use
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For students interested in studying biomechanical engineering, especially in the field of surgery, this lesson serves as an anatomy and physiology primer of the abdominopelvic cavity. Students are introduced to the abdominopelvic cavity—a region of the body that is the focus of laparoscopic surgery—as well as the benefits and drawbacks of laparoscopic surgery. Understanding the abdominopelvic environment and laparoscopic surgery is critical for biomechanical engineers who design laparoscopic surgical tools.

Subject:
Anatomy/Physiology
Applied Science
Engineering
Life Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Benjamin S. Terry
Brandi N. Briggs
Denise W. Carlson
Stephanie Rivale
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Alternative swabs and storage for SARS-CoV-2 detection in a hospital environment
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"Since its appearance in late 2019, COVID-19 has caused well over one million deaths worldwide. Large-scale testing and contact tracing remain critical for controlling viral spread. Complying with the US CDC and WHO protocols for sample collection requires a ready supply of inexpensive swabs and collection reagents. Unfortunately, CDC-approved clinical-grade sampling supplies are expensive, and additionally, current methods prevent further analysis of the microbiome due to the presence of antibiotics in viral transport media. Researchers sought out new testing supplies in a recent study comparing five consumer-grade swabs and one clinical-grade swab. They found that using 95% ethanol instead of viral transfer media reduced RNase activity, preserving samples for microbiome analysis, and extracting directly from the swab head instead of the surrounding liquid resulted in 2-4x higher RNA recovery than the clinical standard..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
02/25/2021
Arabic Level 2, Activity 08: "زِيَارَة المُسْتَشْفَى / Visiting the Hospital" (Face-to-Face/Online)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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In this activity, students will be given a task to practice a conversation on what to say if they were either a doctor or patient, along with using hospital vocabulary and the لـ، مع، عند grammar.Can-Do Statements:I can identify and describe parts of the body.I can describe my condition to the doctor.I can listen to and understand doctors' prescriptions.I can explain in simple words to help others understand the solution(s) I’m giving.

Subject:
Language Education (ESL)
Languages
World Cultures
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Blake Simmerman
Amber Hoye
Sara Bakari
Sara Bakari
Date Added:
11/06/2020
Arabic Level 3, Activity 05 "Places/الأماكن" (Face-to-Face/Online)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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In this activity, students will practice talking and asking questions with a partner about different middle eastern places. students will also practice asking for directions.Can-Do Statements:I can talk about different places with a friend/classmate.I can ask about different places with someone.I can ask for directions when I need to go somewhere.

Subject:
Language Education (ESL)
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Languages
World Cultures
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Sara Bakari
Amber Hoye
Date Added:
04/06/2023
Associations between SARS-CoV-2 and bacteria in the hospital environment
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"SARS-CoV-2 is the notorious virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. Like other viruses, it coexists with a multitude of other microorganisms that could influence our susceptibility to infection. Thus, identifying associations between bacteria and SARS-CoV-2 could lend critical insight for the development of strategies for COVID-19 prevention and treatment. To meet this need, researchers recently characterized the microbial communities associated with COVID-19 patients, health care providers, and indoor surfaces in the hospital environment using 16S rRNA sequencing. They found SARS-CoV-2 RNA on 16% of the surfaces in COVID-19 patient rooms, with the highest prevalence in floor samples and lower prevalence on bed rails. SARS-CoV-2-positive samples had higher bacterial diversity than SARS-CoV-2-negative samples. Interestingly, bacteria in the genus Rothia were commonly found in the samples containing SARS-CoV-2, suggesting the existence of an association between these microorganisms..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
10/13/2021
Bacterial density is an underreported metric in clinical gut microbiome research
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
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This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"In ecology research, population density is an important metric for community analysis studies. Yet even though microbiomes are small ecosystems, microbiome studies rarely report the bacterial density. To evaluate the significance of bacterial density in gut microbiome research, a recent retrospective study examined rectal swabs from hospitalized patients. The authors found that bacterial density had important methodologic significance, as it predicted vulnerability to sequencing contamination. Specifically, low-bacterial-density specimens had higher levels of sequencing contamination. Clinical factors like age, exposure to antibiotics, and comorbidities also varied with bacterial density. Older patients and those with multiple co-morbidities had high bacterial density, while antibiotic exposure correlated with low density. Lastly, bacterial density showed potential as a prognostic indicator, as the density at time of admission correlated with subsequent infection..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
05/17/2022
Challenges of Laparoscopic Surgery
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Educational Use
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Students teams use a laparoscopic surgical trainer to perform simple laparoscopic surgery tasks (dissections, sutures) using laparoscopic tools. Just like in the operating room, where the purpose is to perform surgery carefully and quickly to minimize patient trauma, students' surgery time and mistakes are observed and recorded to quantify their performances. They learn about the engineering component of surgery.

Subject:
Anatomy/Physiology
Applied Science
Education
Engineering
Life Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Benjamin S. Terry
Brandi N. Briggs
Denise W. Carlson
Stephanie Rivale
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Designing a Robotic Surgical Device
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Educational Use
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Student teams create laparoscopic surgical robots designed to reduce the invasiveness of diagnosing endometriosis and investigate how the disease forms and spreads. Using a synthetic abdominal cavity simulator, students test and iterate their remotely controlled, camera-toting prototype devices, which must fit through small incisions, inspect the organs and tissue for disease, obtain biopsies, and monitor via ongoing wireless image-taking. Note: This activity is the core design project for a semester-long, three-credit high school engineering course. Refer to the associated curricular unit for preparatory lessons and activities.

Subject:
Applied Science
Engineering
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Benjamin S. Terry
Brandi N. Briggs
Denise W. Carlson
Stephanie Rivale
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Dramatic Play- Doctor's Office/ Hospital
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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This resources provides information about setting up a doctor's office/ hospital dramatic play center. Resources, question prompts, literature recommendations, picture examples, and downloadable resources are included.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Date Added:
08/04/2018
The Hospital of the Future: Engineering through Robotics and Automated Patient Care
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Educational Use
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Students further their understanding of the engineering design process while combining mechanical engineering and bioengineering to create an automated medical device. During the activity, students are given a fictional client statement and are required to follow the steps of the design process to create medical devices that help reduce the workload for hospital workers and increase the quality of patient care.

Subject:
Applied Science
Engineering
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Jared R. Quinn
Jeanne Hubelbank
Kristen Billiar
Terri Camesano
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Rolling Blackouts & Environmental Impact: What Are Our Electricity Options?
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Educational Use
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Through this activity, students come to understand the environmental design considerations required when generating electricity. The electric power that we use every day at home and work is usually generated by a variety of power plants. Power plants are engineered to utilize the conversion of one form of energy to another. The main components of a power plant are an input source of energy that is used to turn large turbines, and a method to convert the turbine rotation into electricity. The input sources of energy include fossil fuels (coal, natural gas and oil), wind, water, nuclear materials and refuse. This activity focuses on how much energy can be converted to electricity from many of these input sources. It also considers the impact of the by-products associated with using these natural resources, and looks at electricity requirements. To do this, students research and evaluate the electricity needs of their community, the available local resources for generating electricity, and the impact of using those resources.

Subject:
Applied Science
Engineering
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Self-sampling may be a viable sample collection method for SARS‑CoV‑2 testing
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"The recent outbreak of SARS-CoV-2 infections has strained healthcare systems worldwide and diagnostic testing is a critical part of any pandemic management plan. PCR tests on clinical samples collected by health care professionals (HCPs) is currently the gold standard, but patient self-sampling may facilitate increased testing without adding strain or risk of exposure for HCPs. A recent study tested the sensitivity, feasibility, and acceptance of self-collected oropharyngeal samples. Hospitalized SARS-CoV-2-infected patients collected two self-administered samples and filled out a questionnaire. Researchers also collected HCP-administered samples for comparison. While the HCP-collected samples had the highest estimated sensitivity compared to each of the self-collected samples, at 88%, 78%, and 77% respectively, using both self-collected sample results together increased their estimated sensitivity to 88%, which is comparable to the HCP-collected samples..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Applied Science
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
10/14/2021
A mouse model of subclinical colonization and outgrowth of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"Antibiotic-resistant bacteria like carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) pose a serious threat to human health. Some resistant pathogens can exist alongside our commensal microbiota at undetectable levels. Antibiotic use can lead to outgrowth of these subclinically colonized bacteria. A recent study sought to better understand the interaction between the gut microbiota and CRE during subclinical colonization and outgrowth. First, researchers exposed wild-type mice to the CRE _K. pneumoniae_. While the levels of _K. pneumoniae_ were not detectable after exposure, the post-exposure microbiome was disrupted. Then, administration of an antibiotic cocktail, ampicillin, vancomycin, or azithromycin induced _K. pneumoniae_ outgrowth while reducing overall microbial diversity. Vancomycin only induced outgrowth in a subset of mice. The researchers found these outgrowth-susceptible mice had differences in mRNA stability pathways and xylose abundance..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
05/18/2022