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Recognition of Microorganisms
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CC BY-NC-ND
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The innate immune system recognises components of pathogens which are intrinsically foreign (i.e. not present on normal mammalian cells), such as Lipolysaccharides, Peptidoglycans and D-isoform amino acids.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
WikiVet
Provider Set:
Blood
Date Added:
02/11/2015
Recruiting mosquito gut microbes to fight disease
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CC BY
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This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"Microbes are widely known to spread disease, but could they also help prevent it? A look inside in the mosquito gut reveals a community of microbes fit for the job. Mosquitoes are well-known vectors of disease, transmitting West Nile and Zika virus and the pathogens that cause malaria and dengue fever. Unfortunately, traditional control methods have led to insecticide resistance and negative impacts on other organisms, but mosquitoes, like other animals, also host non-disease-causing microbes in their gut. These benign microorganisms can directly interact with the deadly pathogens harbored by these insects. They can also affect mosquito traits influencing pathogen transmission, such as their population density, development, biting rate, and survival. For example, certain bacterial strains can reduce female fertility and the egg-hatching rate, while others can protect mosquitoes from environmental stress..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
10/14/2021
Rhamnolipid, a naturally produced oil dispersant, may improve oil spill remediation
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CC BY
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This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"Oil spills have devastating effects on the environment, and thousands, of varying size, occur each year. Spilled oil can be removed from the environment in numerous ways, such as with the use of dispersants to break up oil slicks on the water surface. But while oil spills themselves pose well-known threats to marine life, the methods used for oil cleanup can also have unintended consequences. To examine these effects, researchers recently investigated how treatment of oil with dispersants produced synthetically (Finasol) and by bacteria (rhamnolipid) impact microbial communities and their ability to break down oil from the subarctic Atlantic Ocean. They found that cold-loving bacteria initially dominated the bacterial communities when both dispersants were used, but some key species of bacteria that specialize in breaking down aromatic hydrocarbons, which are the major and most toxic components of crude oil, became abundant over time in only the presence of rhamnolipid..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
10/13/2021
Save a Life, Clean Some Water!
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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Student teams practice water quality analysis through turbidity measurement and coliform bacteria counts. They use information about water treatment processes to design prototype small-scale water treatment systems and test the influent (incoming) and effluent (outgoing) water to assess how well their prototypes produce safe water to prevent water-borne illnesses.

Subject:
Applied Science
Engineering
Hydrology
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Christie Chatterley
Denise W. Carlson
Janet Yowell
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Soil-derived bacteria help the Camellia weevil tolerate toxins produced by its host plant
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CC BY
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This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"Plants frequently produce toxic chemicals to defend themselves against hungry insects, meaning that insects must often counteract these defenses if they want to obtain a meal. The Camellia weevil is one such insect that enlists the help of microorganisms living in its gut to neutralize toxins in the tea-oil camellia plant. Given the unique life cycle of this weevil, researchers were interested in finding out how its specialized gut microbiome is acquired. The team used genetic sequencing techniques to identify the microbes in samples taken from weevil guts, tea-oil camellia fruits, and the surrounding soil. They found that bacteria from the soil were primarily responsible for the toxin-degrading activity of the weevil gut microbiome. In particular, Acinetobacter sp. strain AS23 can migrate into the weevil gut and degrade the toxin saponin, thereby allowing the weevils to inhabit and feed on the tea-oil camellia fruits..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
04/14/2023
Water Treatment Plant Operation Processes I
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CC BY
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Presents the basic operating principles and techniques of the conventional surface water treatment processes of coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation, and filtration, plus those of disinfection processes.

Subject:
Applied Science
Career and Technical Education
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Vincent Titiriga
Date Added:
03/20/2020