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.00001 The Value of A Unit With Four Cyphers Going Before It
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Public Domain
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A satire on dissension and political intrigue within Andrew Jackson's administration, surrounding the Spring 1831 resignations of several members of his Cabinet. In the center Jackson sits in a collapsing chair, labeled "The Hickory Chair is coming to pieces at last." Seated on the arm of his chair is a rat with the head of Postmaster General William T. Barry. On the floor before him is a pile of resignations with a broken clay pipe, and a brazier. He sweeps with a broom at a number of rats scurrying at his feet, and in the act knocks over the "Altar of Reform" toppling a winged ass also holding a broom. The rats have heads of (from left to right) Secretary of State Martin Van Buren, Secretary of War John H.Eaton, "D. I. O."(?), Navy Secretary John Branch, and Treasury Secretary Samuel D. Ingham. John Calhoun is a terrier which menaces the Van Buren rat. Van Buren, threatened by an eagle while attempting to climb the "Ladder of Political Preferment" whose rungs are labeled with the names of the states, says, "If I could only humbug that Eagle and climb up this ladder." Calhoun: "You don't get up if I can help it." Eaton: "I'm off to the Indians." Branch: "This from the greatest and best of men." Ingham: "Is this the reward of my Patriotic disinterestedness." In a doorway marked "Skool of Reform" appears a man in a visored cap and fur-trimmed coat saying, "There's Clay, and this is all Clays doings." Daniel Webster and Henry Clay (with raised arms) look in through a window. Webster: "That Terrier has nullified the whole Concern." Clay: "Famine! War! Pestilence!"|Cock of the Walk fecit. (Edward Williams Clay).|Entered . . . 1831 by E.W. Clay.|Publd by E.W. Clay, S.E. corner of Walnut and 4th St. Philada.|The print appears to have been derived from William James Hubbard's portrait of Jackson, or from Albert Newsam's 1830 lithograph reproducing the painting. A pencil sketch believed by Davison to be Clay's sketch for the print is in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington. The Library's impression of ".0001" was deposited for copyright on May 5, 1831. Davison also lists a second edition of the print. Two anonymous versions of the print, possibly derived from ".00001," were published under the title "The Rats leaving a falling house." (See 1831-2).|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Davison, no. 32 (sketch), 56 and 57.|Murrell, p. 109-110.|Weitenkampf, p. 24.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1831-1.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
01: How the Monuments Came Down Series and Curriculum Guide introduction
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CC BY
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BEGIN HERE: How the Monuments Came Down Series and Curriculum Guide introduction: Introductory information about the series and curriculum guides, along with a linked list of the episodes in order.Note: This item and the collection it belongs to was imported with permission from #GoOpenVA. While the content is the same, the original location can be found here.  

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
#GoOpenVA Administrator
Date Added:
10/06/2021
02: The New South | How the Monuments Came Down
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CC BY-NC
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Learn how enslaved African Americans in Richmond, Virginia, established what a historian in this clip calls “quasi-free communities, where they etched out lives for themselves, that paved the way forward.”  This resource is part of the How the Monuments Came Down collection, created by Virginia Public Media.

Subject:
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Trish Reed
Date Added:
02/01/2023
03: Decoration Day | How the Monuments Came Down
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CC BY-NC
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Discover the differing approaches to memorialization among African Americans and white southerners, in Richmond, Virginia, in the years immediately after the Civil War.  This resource is part of the How the Monuments Came Down collection.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Author:
Trish Reed
Date Added:
10/06/2021
04: The Right to Vote | How the Monuments Came Down
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CC BY-NC
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Discover how African American political organizing in Richmond, Virginia, in the first decades after the Civil War, secured a measure of power amid ongoing fights against injustice.   

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Primary Source
Author:
Trish Reed
Date Added:
10/06/2021
05: Lee Memorialization | How the Monuments Came Down
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CC BY-NC
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Discover how white southerners in Richmond, Virginia, honored General Robert E. Lee through a monument of his likeness unveiled in the former Confederate capital in 1890. 

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Primary Source
Author:
Trish Reed
Date Added:
10/06/2021
06: John Mitchell, Jr. and Maggie L. Walker | How the Monuments Came Down
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CC BY-NC
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Discover John Mitchell, Jr. and Maggie L Walker, two African American leaders in Richmond, Virginia, whom a historian in this clip refers to as “the vanguard” of Black resistance to white supremacy there. 

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Primary Source
Author:
Trish Reed
Date Added:
10/06/2021
07: Lost Cause Narrative and Building Monument Avenue | How the Monuments Came Down
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CC BY-NC
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Learn why white city leaders in Richmond, Virginia, in the early 20th century, embraced the nationwide “City Beautiful” movement through the construction of Monument Avenue, a grand boulevard lined with statues to Confederates. 

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Primary Source
Author:
Trish Reed
Date Added:
10/06/2021
08: Caricatures of African Americans | How the Monuments Came Down
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CC BY-NC
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Learn why blackface minstrelsy in the early 20th century sought to “parody and caricature Black ambition and achievement,” as explained by historians in this clip. Note to Teachers: The video clip, Caricatures of African Americans, includes depictions of blackface; in an effort to provide authentic and transparent resources about the historical experiences of Black Americans, these moments were not censored. 

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Trish Reed
Date Added:
10/06/2021
09: Interstate 95 and the Destruction of Jackson Ward | How the Monuments Came Down
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CC BY-NC
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Learn about Jackson Ward, a historic African American neighborhood in Richmond, Virginia, and why white city leaders supported the construction of an interstate highway through its center in the 1950s. 

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Trish Reed
Date Added:
10/06/2021
10,000,000 Members by Christmas On Christmas Eve, a Candle in Every Window and Red Cross Members in Every Home.
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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Poster showing a holly-decked candle in a window, with the Red Cross symbol in its glow. Forms part of: Willard and Dorothy Straight Collection.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - World War I Posters
Date Added:
06/18/2013
100 Years of Women's Suffrage
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
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Learn how brave women fought for the right to vote and won 100 years ago.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
Laura Town
Williamstown Communications
Karen Hoffman
Date Added:
08/18/2022
10: Crusade for Voters | How the Monuments Came Down
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CC BY-NC
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Discover the motivations, strategies, and success of the Crusade for Voters, a pathbreaking initiative that made possible the election of the first majority-Black city council in Richmond, Virginia, in 1977. 

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Trish Reed
Date Added:
10/06/2021
11: First Majority-Black City Council | How the Monuments Came Down
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CC BY-NC
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Learn why the first majority-Black city council in Richmond, Virginia, in the late 1970s, avoided discussion of the city’s Confederate monuments while attending to urgent crises of housing and education.  

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Trish Reed
Date Added:
10/06/2021
124 Cartridges for 15/6 and Your Money Back with Interest
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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Poster is text only. Published by the National War Savings Committee, 18 & 19, Abingdon Street, Westminster, S.W. Poster no. 18. 20m. Wt. 5213/331. (7940). Title from item.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - World War I Posters
Date Added:
06/18/2013
12: Arthur Ashe | How the Monuments Came Down
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CC BY-NC
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Learn about tennis champion Arthur Ashe, whose death spurred residents of his hometown of Richmond, Virginia, to honor him with a statue along a grand boulevard that had previously only featured statues of Confederates

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Trish Reed
Date Added:
10/06/2021
13: African American Monuments | How the Monuments Came Down
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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Learn how activists in Richmond, Virginia, are working to honor the lives of free and enslaved African Americans, in a city where the most prominent monuments had long celebrated Confederates. 

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Trish Reed
Date Added:
10/06/2021
140th Flag Day, 1777-1917 the Birthday of the Stars and Stripes, June 14th, 1917.
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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Poster showing a man raising the American flag, with a minuteman cheering and an eagle flying above. Text continues: 'Tis the Star Spangled Banner, oh, long may it wave, o'er the land of the free and the home of the brave! Monogram unidentified. Forms part of: Willard and Dorothy Straight Collection.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - World War I Posters
Date Added:
06/18/2013
1492: An Ongoing Voyage
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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The exhibition 1492: AN ONGOING VOYAGE describes both pre- and post-contact America, as well as the Mediterranean world at the same time. Compelling questions are raised, such as: Who lived in the Americas before 1492? Who followed in the wake of Columbus? What was the effect of 1492 for Americans throughout the Western Hemisphere? The Library of Congress' Quincentenary exhibition addresses these questions, as well as other related themes, including fifteenth century European navigation, the myths and facts surrounding the figure of Columbus, and the differences and similarities between European and American world views at the time of contact.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Library of Congress
Date Added:
07/13/2000