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Star Library: Regression - Residuals - Why?
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As teachers of statistics, we know that residual plots and other diagnostics are important to deciding whether or not linear regression is appropriate for a set of data. Despite talking with our students about this, many students might believe that if the correlation coefficient is strong enough, these diagnostic checks are not important. The data set included in this activity was created to lure students into a situation that looks on the surface to be appropriate for the use of linear regression but is instead based (loosely) on a quadratic function.

Subject:
Mathematics
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Consortium for the Advancement of Undergraduate Statistics Education
Provider Set:
Causeweb.org
Author:
Jacqueline B. Miller
Miller, Jacqueline B.
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Star Library: Regression on the Rebound
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This activity is an advanced version of the “Keep your eyes on the ball” activity by Bereska, et al. (1999). Students should gain experience with differentiating between independent and dependent variables, using linear regression to describe the relationship between these variables, and drawing inference about the parameters of the population regression line. Each group of students collects data on the rebound heights of a ball dropped multiple times from each of several different heights. By plotting the data, students quickly recognize the linear relationship. After obtaining the least squares estimate of the population regression line, students can set confidence intervals or test hypotheses on the parameters. Predictions of rebound length can be made for new values of the drop height as well. Data from different groups can be used to test for equality of the intercepts and slopes. By focusing on a particular drop height and multiple types of balls, one can also introduce the concept of analysis of variance.

Subject:
Mathematics
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Consortium for the Advancement of Undergraduate Statistics Education
Provider Set:
Causeweb.org
Author:
Trent D. Buskirk and Linda J. Young, University of Nebraska-Lincoln and University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Star Library: What is the Shelf Life?
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CC BY-NC-SA
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The Food and Drug Administration requires pharmaceutical companies to establish a shelf life for all new drug products through a stability analysis. This is done to ensure the quality of the drug taken by an individual is within established levels. The purpose of this out-of-class project or in-class example is to determine the shelf life of a new drug. This is done through using simple linear regression models and correctly interpreting confidence and prediction intervals. An Excel spreadsheet and SAS program are given to help perform the analysis.

Subject:
Mathematics
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Consortium for the Advancement of Undergraduate Statistics Education
Provider Set:
Causeweb.org
Author:
Bilder, Christopher R.
Christopher R. Bilder
Date Added:
02/16/2011
When Should I Drink My Hot Chocolate?
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Educational Use
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Students act as food science engineers as they explore and apply their understanding of cooling rate and specific heat capacity by completing two separate, but interconnected, tasks. In Part 1, student groups conduct an experiment to explore the cooling rate of a cup of hot chocolate. They collect and graph data to create a mathematical model that represents the cooling rate, and use an exponential decay regression to determine how long a person should wait to drink the cup of hot chocolate at an optimal temperature. In Part 2, students investigate the specific heat capacity of the hot chocolate. They determine how much energy is needed to heat the hot chocolate to an optimal temperature after it has cooled to room temperature. Two activity-guiding worksheets are included.

Subject:
Algebra
Chemistry
Mathematics
Physical Science
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Brian Palacios
Date Added:
02/17/2017