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  • MCCRS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.7 - Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, vi...
American Citizens! We Appeal To You In All Calmness. Is It Not Time To Pause? . . . A Paper Entitled The American Patriot
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Public Domain
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An advertisement announcing publication of the "American Citizen," a short-lived nativist newspaper. The broadside is illustrated with an elaborate and venomous anti-Catholic scene. At left a temple of Liberty stands on a mound labeled "Constitution and Laws." At the foot of the hill is a gathering of native Americans, including sailors, farmers, soldiers, and a Revolutionary War veteran. They hold banners emblazoned with such mottoes as "The Bible The Cornerstone of Liberty," "Beware of Foreign Influence," "None But Americans Shall Rule America," and "Education, Morality, and Religion." Other banners bear the names of sites of great revolutionary battles. In the background are a harbor with ships and the skyline of a city. In contrast, an unruly contingent of foreigners, mostly Irish, alight from a newly landed ship at right. The ship, "from Cork," bears the papal coat of arms. The foreigners carry banners reading, "We Are Bound to Carry Out the Pious Intentions of His Holiness the Pope," "Americans Shant Rule Us!!" and "Fradom of Spache and Action!" Among them are several clerics, a drunken mother with several children, and a few unkempt ruffians. One of the newcomers (lower right) beats a man with a club. In the distance, across the ocean, the basilica of St. Peter's in Rome is visible. From it issues a giant basilisk wearing the pope's crown, which is seized by a large hand from above. A commentary is provided in the lengthy continuation of the title: "Already the enemies of our dearest institutions, like the foreign spies in the Trojan horse of old, are within our gates. They are disgorging themselves upon us, at the rate of Hundreds of Thousands Every Year! They aim at nothing short of conquest and supremacy over us." Below the illustration the text states that the "American Patriot" favors "protection of American Mechanics Against Foreign Pauper Labor. Foreigners having a residence in the country of 21 years before voting, Our present Free School System, and Carrying out the laws of the State, as regards sending back Foreign Paupers and Criminals." The paper opposes "Papal Agression & Roman Catholicism, Foreigners holding office, Raising Foreign Military Companies in the United States, Nunneries and Jesuits, To being taxed for the support of Foreign paupers millions of dollars yearly To secret Foreign Orders in the U.S." |The Patriot is published by J.E. Farwell & Co., 32 Congress St., Boston, and for sale at the Periodical Depots in this place.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Purchase; Caroline and Erwin Swann Memorial Fund.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1852-3.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
The American Flag, A New National Lyric
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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A patriotic, Unionist sheet music illustration. Liberty stands on a pedestal, wearing a Phrygian cap, a white tunic over a long gown emblazoned with stars, and a red sash. She holds a sword in her right hand and a staff with American flag in her left.|Entered according to Act of Congress by Charles S. Stoddard.|Gilmour & Dean, Litho.|The Library's copy of the music sheet was deposited for copyright by Charles S. Stoddard on April 18, 1862.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1862-4.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
American Imperialism: The Spanish-American War
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This collection uses primary sources to explore the Spanish-American War. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Albert Robertson
Date Added:
10/20/2015
American Indian Boarding Schools
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CC BY
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This collection uses primary sources to explore American Indian boarding schools. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
Ethnic Studies
History
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Hillary Brady
Date Added:
10/20/2015
The American Indian Movement, 1968-1978
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This collection uses primary sources to explore the American Indian Movement between 1968 and 1978. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
Ethnic Studies
History
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Franky Abbott
Date Added:
04/11/2016
American Liberty
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

An illustrated sheet music cover for a patriotic song by Freeman Scott. The title appears on a striped shield with laurel and oak branches below and a flag, liberty pole and cap, spears, and bundled fasces (symbolic of unity) behind.|Entered . . . 1850 by M. Keller & J. Neff . . . Eastern District of Philadelphia.|Philadelphia Mathias Keller & J. Neff . . . Baltimore W. C. Peters.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1850-3.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
The American Marseillaise, Or Voice of The People
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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An illustrated sheet music cover for a Whig campaign song, "The American Marseillaise," composed by Benjamin Cahill to mark the July 4, 1844, Boston Clay rally. In keeping with the title and the occasion of the piece the artist evokes the memory of the Revolution, and draws a parallel between George Washington and Whig presidential candidate Henry Clay. Oval medallion portraits of Washington (left) and Clay (right) are suspended by ribbons decorated with wreaths or leaf clusters. From each oval hang the tendrils of a vine. The ribbons are held by an eagle (center) and are labeled "Pater et Fili" (i.e., father and son), referring to Washington and Clay respectively. Below the eagle is a view of Boston and its harbor with the Bunker Hill Monument obelisk (its size considerably exaggerated) surrounded by crowds of troops and people.|Entered . . . 1844 by B. Cahill.|The Library's copy of the cover was deposited for copyright on July 3, 1844.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1844-11.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
The American Ram
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

On the cover of a patriotic song dedicated to Lincoln's secretary of the navy Gideon Welles Uncle Sam rides a "ram," or ironclad steam vessel, down the Mississippi River. The Library's copy of the music cover was deposited for copyright on August 22, 1863, soon after two decisive Union victories on the Mississippi: Vicksburg (July 4) and Port Hudson (July 9). Welles was responsible for ushering the Union navy into the age of ironclad steamers. Several lines of verse on the cover praise the ironclad rams as "shaking the world with rampant dismay! Iron-harnessed, steam-driven, t sweeps o'er the sea, Our American Rampart, the shield of the free!" |Entered . . . 1863 by H. Tolman & Co. . . . Mass.|Published by Henry Tolman & Co. 291 Washington St.|Signed: Green, eng. (Probably Henry F. Green or Greene).|Title appeas as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1863-11.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
American Sympathy and Irish Backguardism
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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A critical look at Irish Repeal movement leader Daniel O'Connell's condemnation of slavery in the United States. Clay portrays O'Connell's agitation against slavery as an affront to American friends of repeal, who contributed sizable amounts of money for "rent" to support the insurgent movement in Ireland. Conversely, Clay also portrays English-supported American abolitionists as inimical to repeal. In the cartoon is an effeminately dressed Robert Tyler, son and personal secretary to John Tyler, as well as a published poet and repeal advocate. Armed with his "Epitaph on Robert Emmet" (an earlier Irish patriot) and "Ahaseurus" (his religious poem, published in 1842) young Tyler presents O'Connell to his father. Robert Tyler proclaims, "Mr. O'Connell this is my Father, he is a great friend to repeal and when he is re elected he will give you his "mite." I am his Son and though I've got no money I've a great deal of Poetry in me--I have begun Robert Emmet's epitaph-from the sale of which I have no doubt I shall be able to send a large Army to Ireland." President Tyler, rising from his chair, says, "Welcome Mr. O'Connell! I'm just what Bobby says I am--I am all for repeal no halfway man but go the whole figure you jolly old Beggar." O'Connell wears knee-breeches and a hat decorated with a republican cockade and a clay pipe. He holds a club marked "Agitation" and a sack "Repale Rint" (i.e., "repeal rent"), and retorts, "Arrah! give up your Slaves I'd rather shake hands wid a pick-pocket than wid a Slave Holder, and if we ge our repale we'll set em all free before you can say Pathernoster--I dont want any of your blood-stained money!" An abolitionist resembling William Lloyd Garrison, with a document "Petition to Tyler to emancipate his slaves" under his arm, touches O'Connell's shoulder. He reassures the Irishman, "Friend Daniel, we will join you in all your views. your cause and ours is one only we dont want to meddle with Irish repeal for fear we may lose our English friends." On the left a black house slave standing beside Tyler's chair adds "By jolly I wish Massa Harry Clay [Kentucky senator Henry Clay] was here--Dis dam low Irishman not dare talk to him dat way!"|Entered . . . 1843 by H.R. Robinson.|H.R. Robinson 142 Nassau St. New York, Lithy in all its branches.|Signed with monogram: EWC (Edward Williams Clay).|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 71.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1843-2.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
Analyzing and Critical Thinking
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Students will analyze photos for specific details that reveal the owner of a specific room.Then the analysis will include literature but will focus on literary devices and connotations.Also, students will have the opportunity to summarize text and then use evidence to support specific connotations.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Interactive
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Shannon Paxton
Date Added:
07/07/2021
Animal Magnetism
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

A swipe at President Van Buren's independent treasury system and his continuation of the monetary policies of predecessor Andrew Jackson. The artist, clearly in sympathy with the Whigs, links corruption in the federal customs and postal systems with the sub-treasury system, whereby federal funds were to be retained by the revenue-collecting agencies and other designated repositories, instead of private banks. The artist forecasts Van Buren's defeat in the 1840 elections. Van Buren, hypnotized by Jackson, is on a couch with a royal crown and scepter on one side and sword and purse on the other. Jackson, his toes touching Van Buren's, sits in a chair to the left with his white plug hat and cane next to him. On the right Treasury Secretary Levi Woodbury (arms crossed), Postmaster General Amos Kendall, and "Globe" editor Francis Preston Blair (far right) observe. Jackson: "Are you asleep? Do you hear me? Tell me what you see?" Van Buren: "I am asleep. I hear nobody but you.--I see a great pole, and a crowd of people. They are cheering an elderly man; whom they hail as President of the United States. On their banners are inscribed Whig Principles!!! I see a little man tumbling down a precipice; on his back is a mill stone inscribed Sub-treasury! oh! lord, oh! lord! Why it is myself!" Woodbury: "Ask him Dr. Jackson, if he sees any thing of "Price" or Swartwout?" (See "Price Current" and "Sub Treasurers Meeting in England," nos. 1838-21 and -20.) Kendall: "Ask him at what rate the Express Mail for North is going now?" Blair: "This will make a good paragraph for the Globe!"|Entered . . . 1839 by John Childs.|New York. Published & sold by J. Childs, Lithographer. 119, Fulton-Street.|Signed with monogram: EWC (Edward Williams Clay).|The Library's impression of the print was deposited for copyright on February 22, 1839.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Davison, no. 122.|Weitenkampf, p. 58.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1839-2.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
Anti Annexation Procession
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

A cynical look at the opposition to American annexation of Texas during the 1844 campaign. At the head of a motley procession is Whig candidate and professed anti-annexationist Henry Clay, riding a raccoon (which looks more like a fox). He is followed by three groups of men. The first (right) are the "Hartford Convention Blue-Lights," who shout, "God save the King!" and "Millions for Tribute! not a cent for defence Go it Strong!" Next (center) is a line of "Sunday Mail Petitioners," led by Clay's strongly religious running-mate Theodore Frelinghuysen, riding a donkey and dressed in clerical robes. They represent the proponents of eliminating postal service on Sundays in the United States, whose campaign was criticized by many as a threat to the separation of church and state. One of them remarks, "I go for the Good old times! wholesome, Fine and Imprisonment!" Prominent antislavery advocate William Lloyd Garrison leads the third group. He displays the banner of "Non Resistance, No Government No Laws--Except the 15 Gallon Law!" His folllowers are the "Abolition Martyrs" (far left), who have been tarred-and-feathered for their activism.|Entered . . . 1844 by J. Baillie.|Lith. & pubd. by James Baillie 118 Nassau St. N.Y.|Signed: H. Bucholzer.|The Library's impression was deposited for copyright on August 26, 1844.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 77.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1844-43.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
Antimasonic Convention In Valdimor [on The] Corner-Stone March
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

An illustrated sheet music cover for a march dedicated to the Masons. According to the text the march was performed "at the Ceremony of laying the Corner Stone of the Masonic Temple, Boston." The illustration parodies the national convention of the Antimasonic party, held in September 1831 in Baltimore ("Valdimor"). The convention nominated William Wirt for President and Amos Ellmaker for Vice President. The attendees are pictured as asses, geese, goats, and other animals gathered at a table presided over by a donkey wearing spectacles (center). A horse at left says, "Mr. President I should like to know what course we are to pursue with regard to the Presidency. I hope no candidate will be entered who is not a "full blooded" Antimason. rather than vote for any other I will "run" for the office myself." A cat in the background says, "No secret societies." A pig at right: "...I agree with my friend opposite. To save my own "Bacon" I would not vote for any man who would not go the "Whole Hog" for Antimasonry. A dog: "...I'm not used to many words. I never spin out a long yarn without getting into a "snarl." I've only to say, that since I have em"barked" in this business I am resolved to go the hull figure." On the wall in the background a clock reads five minutes to midnight.|Boston. Published by C. Bradlee 164 Washington St.|Drawn by David Claypool Johnston.|Entered . . . 1832 by C. Bradlee.|The print appears to have been drawn by David Claypool Johnston. Malcolm Johnson records a sketch for the illustration in the collection of the American Antiquarian Society. D. C. Johnston's "Much Ado about Nothing" (see 1832-3), published in Boston slightly later, is akin in style, lettering, and in the nature of the scene. Both prints include the motif of a clock on the background wall.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Johnson, no. 141.|Weitenkampf, p. 27.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1832-1.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
The Apotheosis
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

The print is a fragment of a larger lithograph entitled "Invasion of Cuba," composed of two panels, applauding American "filibustering" expeditions to liberate Cuba from Spain. (See also "The Great Naval Blockade of Round Island" and "Genl Lopez the Cuban Patriot Getting His Cash," nos. 1849-5 and 1850-10.) "Invasion of Cuba" evidently appeared in the wake of Lopez's second failed invasion of Cuba in August 1851. The left panel, "The Expedition," expresses sympathy with American intervention there in defiance of Great Britain. Our panel criticizes the Fillmore administration's conciliatory attitude toward Cuba, and alignment of the island's Spanish rule with the Catholic Church and other conservative powers in Europe. Spanish governor Jose Gutierez de la Concha sits on a throne in the center of a crowded scene, his left foot on the face of the recumbent female figure of Cuba, as he decorates American consul A. F. Owen, who kneels at left. In the right foreground American Secretary of State Daniel Webster holds a "Secret Treaty with Spain" in one hand and behind his back clasps hands with Britain, represented by a lion in sailor's costume. Nearby stands a fox in uniform, probably representing France. To the right of the throne stand various prelates, bishops, and the pope, along with several beasts wearing crowns. On the left of the throne are ministers with star-shaped heads, in a state of agitation. In the left foreground Brother Jonathan, smoking a cigar and waving a saber, carries off a Cuban flag. Above Gutierez's throne are several smaller scenes of Spanish atrocities. On the left is the execution by a Cuban firing squad of American volunteers under W. H. Crittenden in Havana, August 16, 1851. The captive Americans are bound and kneeling. In the center, expedition commander Narciso Lopez is garroted by a black man, as he sits in a chair decorated with a small cross (an anti-Catholic reference). The scene on the right shows two ships, one American and one Cuban, and has the date August 13. It may represent the capture of Crittenden's retreating forces on the high seas. Below the print is the caustic commentary: "Our Consul at Havana decorated by Don Quixote with the Order of the Golden Fleeze for his Neutrality in the Cuba Question under the Applause of the Absolute Powers! The Stars in Consternation. Jonathan runs off swearing: 'Cuba must be smoked' anyhow!"|Signed with monogram: AW.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Murrell, p. 188-189 (reproduces the complete print).|Weitenkampf, p. 104.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1851-4.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
Are You One of The Bhoys Wot Went To The Weddin? / I Ai'nt Nothin Else
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

Title appears as it is written on the item.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
Argument of The Chivalry
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

A dramatic portrayal, clearly biased toward the northern point of view, of an incident in Congress which inflamed sectional passions in 1856. The artist recreates the May 22 attack and severe beating of Massachusetts senator Charles Sumner by Representative Preston S. Brooks of South Carolina. Brooks's actions were provoked by Sumner's insulting public remarks against his cousin, Senator Andrew Pickens Butler, and against Illinois senator Stephen A. Douglas, delivered in the Senate two days earlier. The print shows an enraged Brooks (right) standing over the seated Sumner in the Senate chamber, about to land on him a heavy blow of his cane. The unsuspecting Sumner sits writing at his desk. At left is another group. Brooks's fellow South Carolinian Representative Lawrence M. Keitt stands in the center, raising his own cane menacingly to stay possible intervention by the other legislators present. Clearly no help for Sumner is forthcoming. Behind Keitt's back, concealed in his left hand, Keitt holds a pistol. In the foreground are Georgia senator Robert Toombs (far left) and Illinois senator Stephen A. Douglas (hands in pockets) looking vindicated by the event. Behind them elderly Kentucky senator John J. Crittenden is restrained by a fifth, unidentified man. Above the scene is a quote from Henry Ward Beecher's May 31 speech at a Sumner rally in New York, where he proclaimed, "The symbol of the North is the pen; the symbol of the South is the bludgeon." David Tatham attributes the print to the Bufford shop, and suggests that the Library's copy of the print, the only known example, may have been a trial impression, and that the print may not actually have been released. The attribution to Homer was first made by Milton Kaplan.|Probably printed by John H. Bufford, Boston.|Signed with monogram: WH (Winslow Homer).|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Tatham, "Pictorial Responses to the Caning of Senator Sumner," p. 15-16.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1856-1.|Exhibited: American Treasures of the Library of Congress.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
Arms of Ye Confederacie
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

A small card bearing a vitriolic indictment of the Confederacy. The artist particularly attacks the the institution of slavery, the foundation of Southern economy. A large shield is flanked by two figures: a planter (left) and a slave. The planter wears spurs and a broad-brimmed hat and smokes a cigar. The slave is clad only in breeches, and his hands are manacled. Above the shield are two crossed flags, the Confederate flag and one bearing a skull and crossbones and the number 290. Between the flags are a rooster and a streamer with the motto "servitudo esto perpetua." On the shield are images associated with the South: a mint julep, a bottle of "Old Rye," a pistol and dagger, a whip and manacles, cotton, tobacco, and sugar plants, and slaves hoeing. In the background left, dominated by the palmetto tree of South Carolina, three planters, one holding a whip, play cards at a table. Beyond, two men duel with pistols. On the right, a female slave is auctioned as two slave children stand by and a black woman watches from a cabin doorway.|G.H. Heap Inv. [i.e., published].|H.H. Tilley Del. et Sc.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1862-13.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
"As Yet, I Have Found No Difficulty In Standing Upon My Own Platform"
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

A puzzling caricature, probably dealing with Reconstruction under Andrew Johnson's administration. The work is quite crudely drawn. An acrobat, with mustache and sideburns and wearing a jester's cap, holds in each hand a mask, one grinning and one frowning. His legs stretch from the head of Pennsylvania congressman Thaddeus Stevens, who holds a paper labeled "Committee of 15" and is seated on a black man, who crawls on all fours, to the head of an unidentified man (probably Johnson) who holds the U.S. Constitution. The latter's back is turned to the viewer and several geese, some alive and some dead, appear at his feet. Stevens, an abolitionist, was one of the most prominent members of the Joint Committee on Reconstruction, composed of fifteen members of Congress. The fool remarks, "As yet, I have found no difficulty in standing upon my own platform."|Entered according to Act of Congress June 8th 1866.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 153.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1866-3.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
The Assassination of The Sage of Ashland
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

The artist conveys some of the profound disappointment and anger among Henry Clay's many supporters at the nomination of Zachary Taylor at the June 1848 Whig convention in Philadelphia. The convention's act was seen as a betrayal of the elder Whig statesman. In a scene based on act 3, scene 1 of Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar," the artist portrays Clay's opponents as treacherous conspirators stalking the unsuspecting statesman. Clay is pictured seated in the library of his estate at Ashland in Kentucky, reading the New York "Tribune," whose editor Horace Greeley was a Clay stalwart. Ten men with raised daggers prepare to attack him from behind. These include various Whig powers Daniel Webster, editor James Watson Webb, former New York mayor William V. Brady, Pennsylvania congressman David Wilmot, Kentucky senator and former Clay ally John J. Crittenden, and New York state party boss Thurlow Weed. Webster: "How many times shall Caesar bleed in sport" Webb: "Liberty! Freedom! Tyranny is dead!!!" Wilmot: "Go to the Pulpit Brutus" Brady: "And you too Cassius" Crittenden: "Stand fast together, lest some friend of Caesar's Should Chance" Weed: "By the necessity of my Nature, Your Enemy".|Drawn by "W.J.C."|Entered . . . 1848 by H.R. Robinson.|Published by H.R. Robinson 31 Park Row, (Opposite the Park Fountain) N. York.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Lorant, p. 188.|Weitenkampf, p. 93.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1848-22.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013