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  • WA.SS.H2.6-8.2 - (WA) Explain and analyze how individuals and movements have shaped Was...
Advocacy in Action
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This unit begins by inviting students to tell the story of their community using artifacts from Washington's history. This allows them to reflect on shared values as well as how people have organized to advocate for those values. Then, students explore how rights are established in their community by analyzing the Washington State Constitution, the Puyallup Tribe Constitution, and the Treaty of Medicine Creek. Next, students investigate four different historic examples of how people have advocated for their rights and values in their community and choose one to research in further depth. In the final phase of the unit, student teams develop an advocacy campaign for a right that is currently being challenged. They conduct research on an issue of their choice, create and execute an action plan, and participate in an advocacy fair to campaign for change in their community. Finally, students draw on what they've learned to answer the unit driving question: "Why do people advocate for issues in their community?"

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Module
Student Guide
Unit of Study
Author:
Educurious .
Date Added:
05/23/2024
Analyzing Historical Documents over Time: Fishing Rights 1854-Present
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CC BY-NC-ND
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This inquiry provides students the opportunity to analyze the attitudes and beliefs of different time periods using Treaties made between the Territory of Washington and Native American tribes. Students will investigate the intentions behind the treaties of 1854-1855 to determine if the ideals were met or not.  Then they will look into how Native Americans used the treaties in 1960-70’s to establish themselves as different from Washington State citizens and as a way to remain “Indian.”  This inquiry is meant to challenge students to analyze the intentions of documents and to predict how they could be seen or used in the future. Students will need to have a solid background on native American cultures and traditions as well as an understanding of manifest destiny to accurately comprehend the results of the treaties recommendations are written below on how this might be done and focusses. The unit will come to a close when students write an argumentative essay using evidence and counterargument to address how documents can be used differently throughout time. 

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Elizabeth Allen
Date Added:
06/29/2020
Cultivating Washington: The History of Our State's Food, Land, and People
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CC BY
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The Cultivating Washington curriculum is intended to be a go-to resource for Washington state middle school educators seeking student-centered instructional materials that make learning about the history of the Pacific Northwest more relevant and meaningful for students.In addition, it is a resource for agricultural education teachers, parents, and community members interested in helping students discover the history and development of agriculture in the state of Washington.

Subject:
Agriculture
Career and Technical Education
Cultural Geography
Economics
Political Science
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Module
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Author:
Barbara Soots
Washington OSPI OER Project
Jerry Price
Date Added:
09/02/2020
Decisions That Define Us
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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Students learn about the controversial history of a mural in Anacortes, WA, and consider what it would take to create a more inclusive and accurate mural in Anacortes today. Then students learn about the tribes, immigrants, and settlers in the region where they live and how their stories are represented in local murals in public spaces. Students draw on what they have learned to respond to the unit driving question: What decisions and whose stories define Washington state? Then, drawing on local resources such as tribal members, historical societies, and museums, students work in teams to propose a new mural that tells an inclusive story of the people and place where they live.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Module
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Author:
Educurious .
Educurious .
Date Added:
12/14/2021
Drumbeats in Time: How do local tribes contribute to the identity of the Kittitas Valley, both past and present?
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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Drumbeats in Time is a collaborative effort between the Thorp School District and members of the Kittitas Band of the Yakama Nation. These units are designed to integrate local Native American oral history and interview skills into the social studies curriculum to help students gain understanding of the life and times of various members of the Kittitas Valley.The sixth grade unit focuses on accounts of modern life and past life in order to develop an understanding of cultural awarness in the future.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Primary Source
Author:
Casceila Miller
Carlee Stueckle
Alexander Ahlgren
Barbara Soots
Washington OSPI OER Project
Date Added:
06/14/2021
Legacy Washington: Ahead of the Curve
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Public Domain
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Washington has been Ahead of the Curve since it first granted women the right to vote in 1883. In 1910 our state became the fifth to include women's suffrage in its constitution — a decade ahead of the nation. And Washington women keep blazing trails in fields from science to bridge building. This video, online exhibit, lesson plan, and poster set from Legacy Washington at the Washington Office of Secretary of State highlights some of these extraordinary women.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Barbara Soots
Washington OSPI OER Project
Date Added:
03/07/2023
Territory and Treaty Making: A study of Tribes, Westward Expansion, and Conflict
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CC BY
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This unit is focused on the examination of a single topic, in this case, the Native Americans of the inland Northwest and conflict that arose when other non-native people started to settle in the northwest, and to specifically address the native populations that lived in the inland northwest. The materials were created to be one coherent arc of instruction focused on one topic. The module was designed to include teaching notes that signal the kind of planning and thinking such instruction requires: close reading with complex text, and specific instructional strategies or protocols are described that support students’ reading and writing with evidence are described in enough detail to make it very clear what is required of students and how to support students in doing this rigorous work. Materials include summative assessment of content and process, central texts, key resources, and protocols that support and facilitate student learning.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Leslie Heffernan
Date Added:
02/16/2018
Washington's First Women in Government
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CC BY
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In this lesson to accompany an online exhibit, students will:
• Review the different roles of government on the federal, state, tribal, and local level.
• Predict roles women have played in the government of Washington state and at the federal level.
• Analyze the growing impact women have had on Washington state governments.
• Engage in small and large-group discussions that use evidence-based arguments.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Student Guide
Provider:
Washington State Department of Education
Author:
Callie Birklid
Joshua Parker
Legacy Washington
Primarily Washington
Washington Office of Secretary of State
Date Added:
03/08/2023
Women's Suffrage in Washington State
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CC BY
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In this focused inquiry, students investigate the question: Are rights “granted” or “won?”. They will also consider: How did women rally support for the vote when they couldn’t vote themselves? What methods were used to gain the right to vote in Washington?
Students will engage in deep reading, develop summaries of information, conduct independent research, and engage in small and large group discussions and write an argument with a well-formed claim, clear evidence, and reasoning.

Photo of Washington Equal Suffrage Association posting signs to promote woman suffrage, Seattle by Curtis Asahel | Washington State Digital Archives. This image is made available for use in research, teaching, and private study.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Washington State Department of Education
Author:
Leslie Heffernan
Primarily Washington
Washington Office of Secretary of State
Washington State Library
Date Added:
03/08/2023