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Overview:
Having experienced the profound racial disparities in the rural South firsthand, writer and education reformer Booker T. Washington (1856-1915) dreamed of a school-building project for Black communities that could help begin to lift them out of poverty. In this history lesson, students examine Washington’s collaboration with philanthropist Julius Rosenwald (1862-1932), and learn how Washington’s hopeful dream slowly became the reality of nearly 5,000 new schools. Built in large part by the communities they served, Rosenwald schools were a ray of hope in the face of poverty and racial discrimination.The Woodson Center's Black History and Excellence curriculum is based on the Woodson Principles and tells the stories of Black Americans whose tenacity and resilience enabled them to overcome adversity and make invaluable contributions to our country. It also teaches character and decision-making skills that equip students to take charge of their futures. These lessons in Black American excellence are free and publicly available for all.
Subject:
U.S. History, Ethnic Studies
Level:
High School
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Provider:
Woodson Center
Date Added:
06/24/2024
License:
Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives
Language:
English, Armenian
Media Format:
Downloadable docs

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