Author:
Tracy Pitzer
Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
High School
Grade:
9, 10, 11, 12
Tags:
  • Civics
  • Sovereign State
  • Sovereignty
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike
    Language:
    English

    The Sovereign State - iCivics

    Overview

    Teacher's Guide: The Sovereign State by iCivics

    Time Needed: Two class periods

    Materials Needed:

    • Student Worksheets
    • Power Point w/projector (optional)
    • Colored pencils (optional)

    Copy Instructions:

    • Anticipation & Closing Activities (half pages back to back; class set)
    • Guided notes organizer (1 page; class set)
    • Create a State Worksheets (2 pages; class set)

    Learning Objectives. Students will be able to:

    • Identify and describe the four features of a state.
    • Differentiate between a sovereign state and the “states” in the United States by deciding whether the four features of a state apply to each.
    • List the four roles of government.
    • Apply the features and roles of a state by creating a profile of a new, fictional sovereign state and deciding on its priorities.

    Features of a State

    Population: a body of people,

    Territory: living in a defined space,

    Sovereignty: with the power to make and enforce laws without having to check with any higher authority,

    Government: and with an organization to do this.

    Features of a State

    Four Roles of Government

    For each example have students tell where it should go in the Graphic Organizer.

    Please each of the following terms in the appropriate sector of the graphic organizer:

    • Army
    • Kids under 14 can't work
    • Sheriff
    • People have freedom of speech
    • Highway Patrol
    • Veterans' hospital
    • Navy
    • The voting age is 18
    • Air Force
    • Schools
    • F.B.I.
    • Marines
    • Retirement benefits
    • Jobs must pay minimum wage
    • Highway system
    • Police

     

    Is that a State?

    States in the context of the United States as distinguished from a state -- in the context described above.

    Is that a State?

    Mini Quiz

    Ask your class the following T/F questions:

    • A state can’t have less than 30,000 people.

    • The boundaries of a territory can change.

    • Sovereignty means that you have to check with someone above you.

    • Government only exists to keep order and provide security.

    • The 50 states that make up the USA are not considered independent “states.”

    Mini Quiz

    Ask your class the following T/F questions:

    • A state can’t have less than 30,000 people.

    • The boundaries of a territory can change.

    • Sovereignty means that you have to check with someone above you.

    • Government only exists to keep order and provide security.

    • The 50 states that make up the USA are not considered independent “states.”

    Mini Quiz

    Ask your class the following T/F questions:

    • A state can’t have less than 30,000 people.

    • The boundaries of a territory can change.

    • Sovereignty means that you have to check with someone above you.

    • Government only exists to keep order and provide security.

    • The 50 states that make up the USA are not considered independent “states.”

    Mini Quiz

    Ask your class the following T/F questions:

    • A state can’t have less than 30,000 people.

    • The boundaries of a territory can change.

    • Sovereignty means that you have to check with someone above you.

    • Government only exists to keep order and provide security.

    • The 50 states that make up the USA are not considered independent “states.”

    Mini Quiz

    Ask your class the following T/F questions:

    • A state can’t have less than 30,000 people.

    • The boundaries of a territory can change.

    • Sovereignty means that you have to check with someone above you.

    • Government only exists to keep order and provide security.

    • The 50 states that make up the USA are not considered independent “states.”