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The American Indian Movement, 1968-1978
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CC BY
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This collection uses primary sources to explore the American Indian Movement between 1968 and 1978. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
Ethnic Studies
History
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Franky Abbott
Date Added:
04/11/2016
Civics
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Civics is the study of our national government, constitution, and the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. Topics include democracy and other forms of government; legislative, executive, and judicial functions; the political process; and foreign and domestic policies. It also includes a summary of Washington State History and local native sovereignty.

Subject:
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Date Added:
10/23/2017
Civics, Foundations of Government
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Social Studies Targets:Forms of governmentNature/Purposes of governmentIdeologies of governmentComparative governmentEconomic systems and governmentLearning Targets:Understand how the world is organized politically and nations interact (civics)Identify the differences in philosophy, structure, and the nature of different types of government (civics)Understand the role of sovereignty in the development of different governments and within governments (civics)Compare and contrast democracies with other forms of government.(civics)Understand individual rights and their accompanying responsibilities including problem solving and decision making at the local, state, and international level. (civics)Understand how cultural forces and factors influenced and were influenced by changes in government (Cultural Geography)Identify ways that power can be distributed geographically within a state (Physical Geography)Identify the different types of economic systems (Economics)Understand how different government and economic systems influence one another (Economics)Students will recognize and analyze the ideologies inherent in different economic systems. (Economics)

Subject:
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Civics, Foundations of Government, The Sovereign State - iCivics
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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Teacher's Guide: The Sovereign State by iCivicsTime Needed: Two class periodsMaterials Needed:Student WorksheetsPower Point w/projector (optional)Colored pencils (optional)Copy Instructions:Anticipation & Closing Activities (half pages back to back; class set)Guided notes organizer (1 page; class set)Create a State Worksheets (2 pages; class set)Learning Objectives. Students will be able to:Identify and describe the four features of a state.Differentiate between a sovereign state and the “states” in the United States by deciding whether the four features of a state apply to each.List the four roles of government.Apply the features and roles of a state by creating a profile of a new, fictional sovereign state and deciding on its priorities.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Tracy Pitzer
Date Added:
10/23/2017
Ethnicity and Race in World Politics, Fall 2005
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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Ethnic and racial conflict appear to be the hallmark of the new world order. What accounts for the rise of ethnic/racial and nationalist sentiments and movements? What is the basis of ethnic and racial identity? What are the political claims and goals of such movements and is conflict inevitable? Introduces students to dominant theoretical approaches to race, ethnicity, and nationalism, and considers them in light of current events in Africa, Europe, and the Americas. Discerning the ethnic and racial dimensions of politics is considered by some indispensable to understanding contemporary world politics. This course seeks to answer fundamental questions about racial and ethnic politics. To begin, what are the bases of ethnic and racial identities? What accounts for political mobilization based upon such identities? What are the political claims and goals of such mobilization and is conflict between groups and/or with government forces inevitable? How do ethnic and racial identities intersect with other identities, such as gender and class, which are themselves the sources of social, political, and economic cleavages? Finally, how are domestic ethnic/racial politics connected to international human rights? To answer these questions, the course begins with an introduction to dominant theoretical approaches to racial and ethnic identity. The course then considers these approaches in light of current events in Africa, Asia, Latin America, Europe, and the United States.

Subject:
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Nobles, Melissa
Date Added:
01/01/2005
The Fish Wars: What Kinds of Actions Can Lead to Justice
Read the Fine Print
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This online lesson provides perspectives from Native American community members and their supporters, images, news footage, an interactive timeline, and other sources about an important campaign to secure the treaty rights and sovereignty of Native Nations of the Pacific Northwest. Scroll to begin an exploration of the actions Native Nations took to address injustices.

Subject:
Cultural Geography
History
Physical Geography
Physical Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Module
Provider:
Smithsonian Institution
Author:
Native Knowledge 360
Date Added:
08/08/2018
Illegal Logging: Multi-Billion Dollar Transactions Hiding in Plain Sight
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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There is no common agreed definition of illegal logging. Below are three perspectives of what constitutes illegal logging: firstly, that of The Royal Institute of International Affairs (RIIA), an international policy analysis institute, secondly, from Global Witness, an international Rights NGO, and thirdly, from the Indigenous Network on Economies and Trade (INET), a Canadian Aboriginal NGO.

Subject:
Applied Science
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Case Study
Provider:
University of British Columbia
Provider Set:
Open Case Studies
Date Added:
12/07/2016
Introduction to Comparative Politics
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Comparative politics is the systematic study and comparison of the world's political systems. The course begins by discussing the factors and categories of analysis that political scientists and important international institutions like the World Bank, NATO, and the United Nations use regularly; it ends by comparing and contrasting governments from five different regions of the world: the Americas, Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Define the chief characteristics of a nation state; Identify and explain various comparative methodologies used to compare various political systems; Distinguish between unitary, federal, and confederal governmental models; Compare and contrast political cultures in selected countries; Compare and contrast political socialization in selected countries; Describe and explain patterns of representation and participation in selected countries; Compare and contrast the roles and functions of political parties in selected countries; Compare and contrast the role of interest groups in selected countries; Identify and explain governance and policy-making in selected countries; Compare and contrast the role of the executive in selected countries; Compare and contrast the role of the judicial branch in selected countries; Compare and contrast the role of the bureaucracy and the policy process in selected countries; Describe and explain the political economy and development in selected countries; Identify and explain political challenges and changing agendas in selected countries. (Political Science 221)

Subject:
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
Introduction to Western Political Thought
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Political thought, otherwise known as political theory or philosophy, is the study of questions concerning power, justice, rights, law, and other issues pertaining to governance. This course examines major texts in the history of political thought and asks how different views on human nature inform the design of government. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: summarize the passage of political thought through the classical, Renaissance, and Enlightenment periods and based on the works of Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Tocqueville, and Marx; compare and contrast the differences between Plato and Aristotle with regard to their understandings of the nature of the person, ethics, society, citizenship, and governance; explain the historical and intellectual context in which the political thought that helped to develop the modern state came to be; compare and contrast the concepts of justice, freedom, equality, citizenship, and sovereignty in the works of Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau; explain the different versions of, and importance of, 'the state of nature' to political thought; identify the influences of Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau on the development of the United States Constitution; summarize the thoughts of Alexis de Tocqueville on the American political landscape, particularly with regard to religion and equality, and why this has importance beyond the American context; explain Karl Marx's world view, with particular regard to his critique of democracy and the modern, politically liberal, state; how it came to be; and its fundamental link to capitalism. (Political Science 201)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
Latin American Revolutionaries
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This collection uses primary sources to explore leaders of Latin American revolutions. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Albert Robertson
Date Added:
04/11/2016
Native Hawaiian Sovereignty Movement
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
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This lesson provides an overview of Hawaiʻi’s history as a kingdom, the development of the plantation economy in the 19th century, and the shift to statehood in the 20th century. Since the overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy in 1893, Native Hawaiians have been seeking sovereignty from the United States. And with the gradual influx of Asian immigrants to the island as laborers to work on sugar plantations, Native Hawaiians have seen their island’s population change, and with it, a shift in the economic and political dynamics between the indigenous people and Asian Americans.

2021 Social Science Standards Integrated with Ethnic Studies:
Civics and Government: 6.4, 7.5, HS.7, HS.9, HS.10, HS.11
Economics: 7.8, 8.14, HS.17
Historical Knowledge: 6.20, 8,25, HS.53, HS.60, HS.61, HS.63, HS.64, HS.65
Historical Thinking: 6.23, 7.25, 8.31, 8.32
Social Science Analysis: 6.24, 6.27, 6.28, 7.27, 7.29, 7.30, 8.36, HS.71, HS.72, HS.74, HS.78

Subject:
English Language Arts
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
The Asian American Education Project
Date Added:
02/01/2023
Science: Food Sovereignty and Environmental Sustainability
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
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Students will learn about the concept of food sovereignty and will explore features of the traditional food systems of Native Americans in Oregon and compare them to current food cultivation and consumption practices. Optionally, they can then research and prepare case studies of tribal and intertribal food sovereignty projects in Oregon and analyze the lessons those studies can provide for reducing the impact of human activities on natural systems.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Life Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Author:
Aujalee Moore
April Campbell
Date Added:
07/28/2023