Author:
Dorann Avey
Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Lower Primary
Grade:
K, 1, 2
Tags:
  • Cooperation
  • Grade 3
  • Grade 4
  • Grade 5
  • NE PE
  • Nebraska Department of Education
  • Physical Education
  • SHAPE America Standards
  • ne-pe
  • wa-hpe
  • License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike
    Language:
    English

    Education Standards

    Elementary Physical Education Cooperation Unit

    Elementary Physical Education Cooperation Unit

    Overview

    Overview:

    This unit is presented as a series of cooperation, team buidling, and problem solving learning tasks. Learning tasks should begin as partner to partner, and progress to small group, large group, and finally, whole class. Standards 4 and Standards 5 are addessed in this unit. Teachers are encouraged to select the learning tasks that best fit their teaching style and students’ needs. Learning Tasks can be implemented across grade levels using different extensions and refinements.  Modifications and accomodations specific to your learners are strongly recommended. 

    The National Standards and Grade Level Outcomes in this unit are referenced from the "National Standards & Grade Level outcomes for K-12 Physical Education," book. 

     

    Back to Back (Partner-to-Partner)

    Description:

    Students will find one partner to sit back to back with. Each student must link elbows with their partner. Using communication skills, students must only use their legs to stand up at the same time. Student's elbows must remain linked. Students are encouraged to move quickly and efficiently. Once students have successfully stood up at the same time without losing balance and/or disconnecting their elbows, they will attempt to sit back down together to their starting position.

    Below you will find suggested assessments, critical elements and cues to be used during student performance, as well as, sample exit questions for closure. Teachers are encouraged to modifiy, extend, or adapt suggested assessments to meet the needs of your students and environment. 

    Suggested Assessment Task:

    • Teacher Observation: Teachers will assess student's ability to communicate and problem solve to move and stand together. 

    Sample Exit Question:

    • What are some different challenges you faced while trying to stand at the same time as your partner?

    Student Performance: Critical Elements/Cues 

    • Lean againist each other to feel the weight of your partner.
    • Safety Cue: students should not be pulling, shoving, pushing their partner during the process of standing. 
    • Extension: have students find another group of two to combine to make a small-group of four.

    People to People (Partner-to-Partner)

    Description:

    Students will begin the activity in their own self-space, standing back to back with a partner. Teacher will determine one or more body parts for students to connect. For example, teacher may say 'head to knee,' and students must communication and problem solve how to connect one of their heads to one of their knees. Allow 1-2 minutes for exploration. Then, teacher says "people to people." This will prompt students to move in general space, using a designated locomotor skill, in order to find a new/different partner. The goal would be for each student to have worked together at some point during the activity. Please remind students to find a new partner each time the teacher says "people to people."

    Sample Commands:

    • Nose to Knee
    • Elbow to Hip
    • Hip to Hip
    • Head to Deltoid
    • Hand to Foot
    • Finger to Nose
    • Ear to Elbow
    • Bicep to Bicep
    • Quadricep to Hamstring
    • Tricep to Tricep 

    Below you will find suggested assessments, critical elements and cues to be used during student performance, as well as, sample exit questions for closure. Teachers are encouraged to modifiy, extend, or adapt suggested assessments to meet the needs of your students and environment. 

    Suggested Assessment Task:

    • Self-Assessment: Challenge students to identify all the names they worked with during the learning task. Students may write the names down, share the names, and/or stand next to those they worked with. Teacher may also call out different muscles and body parts that students must identify on their own bodies during closure. Use a teacher checklist to collect your data. 

    Sample Exit Question:

    • What strategies did you use with your partner in order to connect the differerent body parts and/or muscles?

    Student Performance: Critical Elements/Cues 

    • Allow students the oppportunity and time to find a new partner once the teacher prompts "people to people."

    • Students should follow the ettiquette and rules of the learning task to remain safe.

    Evolution (Partner-to-Partner)

    Description:

    Students will work partner-to-partner in order to evolve from an egg, to a chicken, and finally to a dinosaur. Students will be challenged to demonstrate personal responsibility, sportsmanship, and positive interaction skills. Every student starts in their own self-space as an egg. The 'eggs' must walk in a curled position, at a low level, to find another egg in general space. When an egg meets another egg, they must first introduce themselves, and answer a teacher directed question. For example, the teacher decides the question student's must answer is: "What does teamwork mean?" Student A meets student B in their egg positions. Student A introduces himself/herself and then answers the teamwork question. When student B is finished answering the question, they participate in a quick round of 'rock-paper-scissors.' Whichever egg wins 'RPS,' will grow into a chicken. If you did not win RPS, you will remain an egg. The chicken, medium level with chicken wings, goes on to find another chicken. Hopefully this is a different student/partner then before. Whoever wins the RPS battle, will grow into a dinosaur. The student who does not win the RPS battle, will devolve back to an egg. The dinosaur goes on to find another dinosaur. Dinosaurs walk and stand tall with their arms above their heads. Students continue to evolve and devolve. When a dinosaur wins a 'RPS' battle, they become a 'king or queen.' The king or queens will walk the boundary lines until the teacher ends the round and introduces the next question to answer. 

    Below you will find suggested assessments, critical elements and cues to be used during student performance, as well as, sample exit questions for closure. Teachers are encouraged to modifiy, extend, or adapt suggested assessments to meet the needs of your students and environment. 

    Suggested Assessment Task:

    • Teacher-Observation: Teachers may pick 1-2 'look-fors' during participation in this activity. Two look-fors could be, communication skills and sportsmanship. Teacher may use a checklist to determine consistency and proficiecny of each performed 'look-for.'

    Sample Exit Question:

    • What does 'good' sportsmanship look like? What does sportsmanship mean?

    Student Performance: Critical Elements/Cues 

    • Egg: Curled, tuck position. Low level. 

    • Chicken: Squat position. Elbows out, flap like a chicken. Medium level.

    • Dinosaur: Stand tall. Arms extend above your head. Hands make claws at the top. High level. 

    • Egg - chicken - dinosaur- king or queen

    Minefield (Partner-to-Partner)

    Description:

    The objective of this learning task is for students to work efficiently together using appropriate communication skills. By the end of this activity, students will have an increased amount of trust in each other and a general idea of how to communicate effectively with a partner.

    Students will find a partner either by choosing or through a random process (teacher decides). The gymnasium should be set-up prior to students participating.

    Gymnasium Set-Up:

    • Scatter random cones, boxes, ropes, etc. throughout the gym floor.
    • Each piece of equipment acts as an obstacle that students must move around. 
    • Vary the amount of equipment/obstacles based off grade-level. 

    Directions for the Learning Task:

    • Grades 2-5 should use blindfolds. One partner will be given a blindfold and the other partner will be the director. 
      • Kindergarten-First Grade may participate in this activity as a form of "Follow the Leader."
    • The traveler (partner who is blindfolded) must be able to move through the obstacles by following the directors commands. 
    • The director must be able to use his/her communication skills in order for the traveler to understand what direction, pathway, and speed to travel in. 
    • The director may not touch the traveler, the director may only use communication to guide his/her partner.
    • If the traveler touches an obstacle, he/she must go back to the start and begin again!
    • Once the traveler makes it across the gymnasium without hitting an obstacle, the partners will switch roles. 

    Below you will find suggested assessments, critical elements and cues to be used during student performance, as well as, sample exit questions for closure. Teachers are encouraged to modifiy, extend, or adapt suggested assessments to meet the needs of your students and environment. 

    Suggested Assessment Task:

    • Peer Assesment: Design a peer assessment in which students must assess his/her partner's ability to use communication skills effectively in order to direct them through the obstacles. Provide a rubric that allows students to know the difference between proper communication and ineffective communication. 

    Sample Exit Question:

    • What type of communicative commands did your partner use that helped you feel comfortable moving through open space blindfolded?

    Student Performance: Critical Elements/Cues

    • Survey the scene before students are blindfolded. Students should have a general idea of the obstacles placed in general space in order to keep safety a priority.
    • Allow 3-5 minutes of time before beginning, for students to discuss what commands/type of communication will be effective in the learning task. 
    • Do not yell, push, run, or kick any piece of equipment on the ground.
    • Choose positivity & honesty. 

    Through the Hoop (Small-Group)

    Description:

    This learning task will challenge students to work in a small-group of 3-6 people. Each group will need one hula-hoop. The idea of this learning task is to adjust, refine or extend, in order to meet the needs of your students and keep them actively engaged. By the end of this learning task, students should have learned and demonstrated proper communication skills, teamwork, and cooperation. 

    Directions for Learning Task:

    • Students will form a small-group. Teacher has the freedom to choose the shape small-groups must form: straight line, circle, triangle, etc. 
    • Each small-group gets a hula-hoop. The hula-hoop will hand between on teammate and the other.
    • They must all connect hands. Explain to students that the connection of hands symbolizes the unification of their team. 
    • The objective is for students in the team to move their entire body through the hula-hoop without disconnecting their hands. 
    • Once the hula-hoop has passed through each teammates body, they must sit to show the teacher their team has met their goal. 
    • Extension: add more than one hula-hoop and/or change the shape students are standing in.

    Below you will find suggested assessments, critical elements and cues to be used during student performance, as well as, sample exit questions for closure. Teachers are encouraged to modifiy, extend, or adapt suggested assessments to meet the needs of your students and environment. 

    Suggested Assessment Task:

    • Self-Assessment: Challenge students to identify how they contributed to their team in order to meet their goal. This may be completed via: think-pair-share, plickers, or an exit ticket.

    Sample Exit Question:

    • What specific, if any, challenges did your team encounter when passing the hula-hoop(s)?
    • How could the teacher make that specific learning task more difficult?

    Student Performance: Critical Elements/Cues

    • If students hands become disconnected, they must start the hula-hoop back at the beginning.
    • Bend/Twist/Curl your body to allow the hula-hoop to pass through quickly.
    • Communication is key!

     

    Sit-Up Relay (Small-Group)

    Description:

    The objective of this learning task is to combine cooperation skills with movement, muscle fitness, and strategy. This learning task will challenge students to engage their core, move quickly, and to work together efficiently. By the end of this activity, students will have increased core strength and will have been able to identify the importance of accountability and teamwork. 

    Gymnasium Set-Up:

    • There should be 6 or 7 cones spread out on the end-line (one side of the gymnasium). There should be a matching cone on the other side of the gymnasium.
    • At each cone, there should be a ball (foam ball, medicine ball, fleece ball, etc.)
    • Small-groups of 4 or 5 at each cone.

    Directions for Learning Task:

    • Each small group should be at a cone on the end-line.
    • Teammates must line up as follows:
      • The first teammate in line should have his/her head in line with the cone. They should be 'laying' on the floor with their knees bent and their feet flat on the floor. Their arms should extend over their head and should be gripping the ball. 
      • The next teammate in line should be ready to run in front of their teammates feet, and lay down with their head directly in front of their teammates feet (knees bent, feet flat on the ground). 
      • Remaning teammates repeat the same process. 
    • Teammate one begins on the start signal. Teammate completes one sit-up with the ball in their hands. When the teammate has finished his/her sit-up, he/she passes the ball to the next teammate in line. Once the ball is passed, the teammate must get up and run to the front of the line to wait for the ball  to get to him/her again. 
    • The teammate who was handed the ball, completes a sit-up, and passes to the next teammate in line. Then, they get up and run to the front of the line. 
    • The relay is complete once the ball has made it to the other side of the gymnasium. 

    Below you will find suggested assessments, critical elements and cues to be used during student performance, as well as, sample exit questions for closure. Teachers are encouraged to modifiy, extend, or adapt suggested assessments to meet the needs of your students and environment. 

    Suggested Assessment Task:

    • Teacher Observation: Teacher may choose 1-2 elements to assess during this activity such as, "Follows teachers directions without any reminders," or "Exhibits responsible behavior in group situations." Teacher may use a teacher checklist to assess student's performance. 

    Sample Exit Question(s):

    • What are two muscles in your core that you felt were engaged in today's learning task?
    • How did you exhbit / show responsible behavior during the sit-up relay?

    Student Performance: Critical Elements/Cues

    • Sit-Up Position: Knees bent, feet flat on the ground, back flat on the ground, arms extend straight over head.
    • Sit-Up Cues: Enage core and lift your arms up off the ground, over your head, and forward towards the floor. 
    • Pass the ball to your teammates hands that should be directly in front of your feet.
    • Teammates should never throw or roll the ball. 
    • After each teammate completes a sit-up, they must run back to the front of the line until they have reached the end. 
    • Do not use elbows and any other form of assistance to sit-up. 
    • Be strong and safe!

    Inchworm (Small-Group)

    Description:

    Inchworm is a learning task that challenges student's intellecutal ability to strategize and communicate to meet their teams goal. By the end of this learning task, students should be able to identify the most effective strategy to get their team from one side to the other using only the hula-hoops provided. 

    Gymnasium Set-Up:

    • 6 or 7 large cones should be spread out on the endline. Place a matching cone on the other side of the gymansium. 
    • Around each large cone on the endline, place 3 hula-hoops in a pile. Two hula-hoops should be small to medium size and one hula-hoop should be large. 

    Directions for Learning Task:

    • Small groups of 4-6 students should line up at each large cone on the endline. 
    • Teams should be in line, one in front of the other, starting at the cone. 
    • Groups may only use the hula-hoops provided and must make it from one side to the other without touching the gymnasium floor.
    • If a teammate touches the gymnasium floor, the whole entire team must go back to the start and start over.
    • Teammates MAY NOT move the hula-hoop with their feet.
    • Teammates MAY NOT move inside the hula-hoop.
    • Challenge teams to make it down and back using the hula-hoops & without touching the ground. 

    Below you will find suggested assessments, critical elements and cues to be used during student performance, as well as, sample exit questions for closure. Teachers are encouraged to modifiy, extend, or adapt suggested assessments to meet the needs of your students and environment. 

    Suggested Assessment Task:

    • Peer Assessment: Students will rate his/her teammates ability to work together and cooperate in order to move across the gymnasium floor without touching the ground. Provide students with a rubric that 'defines' proper teamwork and cooperation skills. 

    Sample Exit Question:

    • Which strategy worked best for your team? Think-Pair-Share.
    • Identify 1-2 challenges your team faced during "Inchworm." How did your team overcome the challenges?

    Student Performance: Critical Elements/Cues

    • You may step, jump, hop, or leap into the next hula-hoop.
    • You MAY NOT move with the hula-hoop when you are standing inside.
    • You MAY NOT step outside the hula-hoop at any point in time. If any part of your body touches the gymnasium floor outside the hula-hoops, your whole team must go back to the beginning.
    • Choose honesty and hold each other accountable for following the directions and playing by the rules.

     

    Pass the Ball- Body (Small-Group)

    Description:

    Pass the Ball, using body parts, will challenge student's creativity and patience. This learning task will target muscle engagement, balance and control, and teamwork. By the end of this learning task, students should be able to use his/her body or muscles in order to pass the ball around to each teammate. Students will understand what it takes to encourage and motivate teammates to complete the task appropriately. 

    Directions for the Learning Task:

    • Students should be in a small group of 5-7 students. 
    • Each group will get a ball: the type of ball or piece of equipment can change depending on grade-level and students. 
    • Students must be able to pass the ball or piece of equipment using selected body part to every member of the team without it dropping and/or touching the ground. 
    • Examples of body parts to be chosen by teacher or students:
      • Feet
      • Elbows
      • Arms
    • Teacher may also decide the formation groups must be in, when passing the ball using body parts. 
    • Examples of different challenges: no talking, passing the ball using the selected body part all the way across the gymnasium, closing eyes, etc. 

    Below you will find suggested assessments, critical elements and cues to be used during student performance, as well as, sample exit questions for closure. Teachers are encouraged to modifiy, extend, or adapt suggested assessments to meet the needs of your students and environment. 

    Suggested Assessment Task:

    • Affective Self-Assessment: Challenge students to identify different emotions felt when participating in the group 'pass the ball' learning task. Teachers may use emotion magnets or cut-outs for students to place in selected categories, or teachers may use plickers, and exit ticket, or have a class-discussion.

    Sample Exit Question:

    • Which body part chosen was the most challenging to use in order to pass the equipment to every group member? Why was it the most challenging?

    Student Performance: Critical Elements/Cues

    • If the piece of equipment touches the ground, it must go back to the start and the group must start over.
    • There is to be no yelling, screaming, or negative talk to group members.
    • Target and engage your muscles when moving the ball or piece of equipment. 
    • Go for control, not speed.
    • Strategize and communicate with your group members!

    Pass the Ball- Throwing (Small-Group)

    Description:

    Pass the Ball- Throwing, is a very similar learning task to the task above. However, this learning task involves the pre-requisite skill of throwing and catching. In order to complete this learning task, please be aware that students must have previous throwing and catching performance knowledge in order to be proficient in this task. By the end this learning task, students will be able to strategize with an emphasis on speed and control. 

    Directions for the Learning Task:

    • Group students in a small-group of 6 or 7. 
    • Each group should be given a type of ball (teacher choice depending on grade-level / skill)
    • The ball must be passed to every group member by way of throwing and catching. 
    • The ball MAY NOT be passed to the person on either side of you!
    • Students will be challenged to figure out the pattern that allows the ball to be passed to every member in the group without passing it to the members standing next to each other. 

    Below you will find suggested assessments, critical elements and cues to be used during student performance, as well as, sample exit questions for closure. Teachers are encouraged to modifiy, extend, or adapt suggested assessments to meet the needs of your students and environment. 

    Suggested Assessment Task:

    • Teacher Observation: Assess student's ability to strategize. Look for whether or not students are following directions with minimal reminders while demonstrating positive, social, and responsible behavior. Use a teacher checklist or other form of teacher observation assessment. 

    Sample Exit Question:

    • How long did it take your team to find the pattern/shape that worked the best to throw the ball to every group member? 
    • What is one teamwork strategy that your group used the most? Why?

    Student Performance: Critical Elements/Cues

    • No throwing to the member standing next to you (right and left).
    • Use the appropriate amount of force when throwing the ball.
    • Keep your eyes on the ball when catching. Catch using both hands.
    • It is okay if you drop it, pick the ball up and continue the throwing pattern. 

     

    Lava (Large Group)

    Description:

    Lava can be modified and extended in many different ways in order to meet the needs of your class and students. The purpose of Lava is for students to work together in a large group, using equipment provided, to make it across the gym without touching the ground. By the end of this learning task, students should have an understanding of what it takes to work together in a large group to accomplish one common goal. 

    Gymnasium Set-Up:

    • In the center of the gym, lay out different pieces of equipment that students can safely use to step, slide, or jump on. 
    • On either side of the center circle in your gymnasium, lay out one gymnastic mat to serve as the Volcano Mountain. 
    • On each team's endline, provide teams with three poly-spots, two scooters, and one base (can be modified based off equipment your program has).

    Directions for the Learning Task:

    • This learning task is appropriate for grades 3-5.
    • Once the gymnasium is set-up, divide the class into two large groups. 
    • Send one team to the north side of the gym and the other team to the south side of the gym.
    • Teams will have one common goal: make it to the other side without touching the 'lava.'
    • In order to cross the lava without touching it, teams must:
      • Only use the equipment provided on their side to get to the mountains and/or center. 
      • The Volcano Mountain is safe to stand on when crossing. If a member from Team A is standing on the mountain, members from Team B cannot access the mountain at that time. This is a posession rule.
      • The Volcano Mountains do not move. They can't be taken with teams. 
      • The center of the gym houses more pieces of equipment teams can use. Teams may only retrieve one piece of equipment at a time and up to five additional pieces of equipment total.
      • Once they have retrieved their five additional pieces of equipment, they may not take any more. 
      • Teams must strategize to determine which pieces of equipment are the most important to retrieve. 
      • If teams are not possessing their equipment, it is up for grabs. Meaning, someone from the other team may take it for their teams use. 
      • If a team member touches the ground, only that team member must go back to the start. Other members must find a way to get that team member back to where the rest of the team is.
      • Once all team members have crossed the gym without touching the lava, their team has gained a point.
      • Complete best out of 3 rounds. Each round introduce a new rule or challenge. 
      • All rules may be changed or modified to keep students engaged and challenged. 

    Below you will find suggested assessments, critical elements and cues to be used during student performance, as well as, sample exit questions for closure. Teachers are encouraged to modifiy, extend, or adapt suggested assessments to meet the needs of your students and environment. 

    Suggested Assessment Task:

    • Peer Assessment: Have students sit with a partner/teammate. Students will identify one thing they saw their partner do that demonstrated great teamwork. Teammates will share and discuss what they learned from that activity and what the take-aways were for what makes a large group learning task successful. Teacher will walk around and monitor discussions.

    Sample Exit Question:

    • Which pieces of equipment did your team chose to add to your collection and why?
    • What teamwork strategies did your team use to be successful?
    • How did you overcome challenges?

    Student Performance: Critical Elements/Cues

    • If you touch the lava, go back to the beginning until one of your teammates comes to help/assist you. 
    • No screaming or yelling.
    • Do not throw the equipment over student's heads.
    • When using the scooters, do not stand on the scooter while the wheels are down. 
    • No pushing or shoving. 
    • Rock, Paper, Scissors if you get to the same piece of equipment at the same time. Winner determines who gets to keep the equipment. 
    • Be safe and have fun!