Author:
Leslie Heffernan, Jerry Price, Barbara Soots, Kari Tally, Washington OSPI OER Project
Subject:
History, U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Upper Primary
Tags:
  • Civic Action
  • Civics
  • Conflict
  • Cooperation
  • Culture
  • Disease
  • Environment
  • Exploration
  • Inquiry
  • Interaction
  • Native American
  • Population
  • Taking Informed Action
  • Tribal History
  • wa-social-studies
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Downloadable docs

    Education Standards

    The State We're In: Washington - Teacher Guide Chapter 2 - First Contacts Between Native Northwest People and Europeans

    The State We're In: Washington - Teacher Guide Chapter 2 - First Contacts Between Native Northwest People and Europeans

    Overview

    Contact between Native and non-native people forever changed the landscape of North America. European exploration drove many changes to the Northwest, including trade, exploration.

    This is the teacher guide companion to The State We're In: Washington (Grade 3-5 Edition) Chapter 2. The resource is designed to engage students with a launch activity, focused notes, and a focused inquiry.

    Introduction

    In this focused inquiry, students will investigate the impact of disease (focusing on measles, malaria, and smallpox) on Native people in the Pacific Northwest. Students will read maps and text sources about the introduction of diseases due to interactions between Native and non-native populations and make discoveries about how these interactions changed Native people

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    First Contacts Between Native Northwest People and Europeans

    General Overview

    Enduring Understanding

    Contact between Native and non-native people forever changed the landscape of North America. European exploration drove many changes to the Northwest, including trade, exploration

    Supporting Questions

    Students consider these questions - finding and using evidence to support the Enduring Understanding.

    • What drove Europeans to “explore” the Pacific Northwest?
    • What evidence do we have of conflict and cooperation?
    • How did exploration and interaction affect the lives of Native Americans?

    Learning Targets

    Students will be able to…

    • G2.5.4 Describe how environmental and cultural characteristics influence population distribution in specific places or regions.
    • G3.5.1 Describe the impact of European settlements on Native American tribes.
    • H4.4.2 Use evidence to develop a claim about Washing­ton state, and tribal nations and groups.
    • H4.4.4 Generate questions about multiple historical sources and their relationships to particular historical events and developments.
    • SSS4.5.3 Use evidence to develop claims in response to compelling questions.

    Key Vocabulary

    A list of key Tier 2 vocabulary words is included here for your students. Teach these using whatever strategy you find works best for your students. Encourage students to incorporate these vocabulary words as they work through the components of the chapter guide and intentionally use them as appropriate in their final products.

    • Northwest passage, a waterway that crossed all the way through North America (p.19)
    • Doctrine of discovery, the belief that a country could claim ownership of any land they found that was not occupied by Catholics. (p. 19)
    • Fur trade, the exchange of animal pelts/furs for goods and money (p. 21)
    • Smallpox & measles, contagious (easily spread) viruses that killed many Native people who were not immune (p. 24)
    • Stovepipe hats, tall, black hats that were made from beaver pelts (p. 31)

    Task 1: Launch

    Hooking students into the content of the chapter.

    Distribute the Student handout: Launch to students.

    • Guide students in answering the prompts on the handout individually and in partners (or as best to meet the needs of your students).
    • There is no “correct” answer. Encourage the students to explain their thinking with each other. The point of this activity is to spark curiosity.

    Task 2: Focused Notes

    Activating student thinking about the content of the entire chapter.

    Distribute the Student handout: Focused Notes to students.

    • As students read, they will record their understanding, thinking, and questions about the content using the handout. This can be done individually or collaboratively in pairs or small groups.

    Task 3: Focused Inquiry

    A focused inquiry is a one-to-two-day lesson that will have students engaging in the C3 Framework’s Inquiry Arc. The link below includes both teacher and student documents.

    Compelling Question

    How did disease impact Native people in the Pacific Northwest?

    Attribution and License

    Attribution

    This Teacher’s Guide for The State We’re In: Washington - Chapter 2 was developed by Leslie Heffernan, Central Valley School District.

    The downloadable digital version of The State We're In: Washington (Grades 3-5 Edition) by Jill Severn for the League of Women Voters of Washington Education Fund is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. Print copies of The State We’re In: Washington, may be purchased from the League of Women Voters of Washington website.

    License

    CC BY logo
    Except where otherwise noted, Teacher’s Guide Chapter 2 - The State We’re In: Washington, copyright Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, is available under a Creative Commons Attribution License. All logos and trademarks are property of their respective owners. Sections used under fair use doctrine (17 U.S.C. § 107) are marked.